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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Fraud Alert


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/385932

mander - Posted - 09/26/2022:  17:21:52


I get a Fraud Alert call for sixty-one CENTS. I cancel my card. Later, I think, who would charge something for sixty-one cents? I call the fraud place and find out it was to buy a dog purse. For 61 cents? Okay.



I'm thinking I got off lucky, and then I go check my account and find out that there's a $300.00 charge that didn't signal a fraud alert. So, now I'm on hold all over again.



Oh the joys of being robbed.



This is the fourth time in six months I've had to replace my card!


Edited by - mander on 09/26/2022 17:26:21

5B-Ranch - Posted - 09/26/2022:  17:25:44


Did the 61 cents charge happened before the 300 dollar charge ?61 cents was a test to see if your card was valid

mander - Posted - 09/26/2022:  17:30:01


quote:

Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

Did the 61 cents charge happened before the 300 dollar charge ?61 cents was a test to see if your card was valid






Difficult to tell, only shows a date, not a time. Those are my thoughts as well.

mander - Posted - 09/26/2022:  17:47:28


Actually, I learned the 61 cents came after. Because it is the second fraud that triggers the alert, people cancel when they get the alert, often, like me, not checking to see if there is something prior to the alert. Denying the second transaction with no knowledge of the first transaction causes the first transaction to look valid. Now, I have to make a formal complaint and prove I didn't make the transaction.

5B-Ranch - Posted - 09/26/2022:  19:21:13


quote:

Originally posted by mander

Actually, I learned the 61 cents came after. Because it is the second fraud that triggers the alert, people cancel when they get the alert, often, like me, not checking to see if there is something prior to the alert. Denying the second transaction with no knowledge of the first transaction causes the first transaction to look valid. Now, I have to make a formal complaint and prove I didn't make the transaction.






That is so inconvenient. I hope karma puts out an APB on whom ever is responsible. 

OldNavyGuy - Posted - 09/26/2022:  19:50:56


quote:

Originally posted by mander

This is the fourth time in six months I've had to replace my card!






There is a possibility that some place that you frequent, such as a gas station, restaurant, etc. has a card skimmer installed.



 

csrat - Posted - 09/27/2022:  00:47:09


quote:

Originally posted by mander


....




This is the fourth time in six months I've had to replace my card!






You're on someone's list. You need to make changes.



No use of a debit card, ever.



No use of gypsy ATM's. That would be ATM's not sponsored by a bank. The kind you find at gas stations, convenience stores, arenas that host sports and entertainment events, bars even. For you, no ATM that isn't at a bank.



If you must shop online, buy pre-loaded MasterCards and Visas, in smaller increments. When an app on your phone, or any place on the internet, asks if you want to save your card information, the answer is always NO. Secure your home network and don't shop from locations off your network.



Cancel ALL autopay for at least six months, a year would be better. If you decide to restart at a later date, use different cards or accounts.



Zealously monitor your accounts. Let your bank know what's going on. Call your credit card companies, ask what security features are available and ask for their recommendations. Let them know why you are asking and let them know you are becoming proactive in fighting this problem.



Watch out for small purchases that aren't yours. They busted a foreign operation a few years ago that would make $5 charges, $9.95 and such with company names that look like you might use. Folks who frequented convenience stores and fast food places were ideal for their operation.



Pay off your credit cards. Much harder to defraud someone who doesn't carry debt on their cards.



Could be someone local, like the drive-thru clerk at Starbucks, or the waitress who took your card at Applebee's, or the girl that did your hair at the salon. Never let your card out of your sight. Easiest thing for these folks to do is to plug in a small swipe reader on their phones. 



Your diligence is the only way to stop this.


Edited by - csrat on 09/27/2022 00:51:03

1935tb-11 - Posted - 09/27/2022:  05:58:31


had that happen to me a couple of years ago,,had a charge at an oil change place in maryland..problem was i had not been there and it was on a sunday morning a 2:30 am.
so monday off to the bank to cancel card and get new one...pain in A$$ but i got off easy .

5B-Ranch - Posted - 09/27/2022:  06:13:17


CRAT quote:
“Could be someone local, like the drive-thru clerk at Starbucks, or the waitress who took your card at Applebee's, or the girl that did your hair at the salon. Never let your card out of your sight. Easiest thing for these folks to do is to plug in a small swipe reader on their phones.”
———————————-
This sorta happened in my case. Our waiter gave my card to someone else.
I canceled the card when I got home. We got the card from the waiter when she realized what she had done. The length of time it was not in my possession was enough time to collect the card number and Cvv code . Got a new card the next day. Called to cancel the card when we got home. Good to have off hours bank services.

mander - Posted - 09/28/2022:  02:59:57


quote:

Originally posted by csrat

quote:

Originally posted by mander


....




This is the fourth time in six months I've had to replace my card!






You're on someone's list. You need to make changes.



No use of a debit card, ever.



No use of gypsy ATM's. That would be ATM's not sponsored by a bank. The kind you find at gas stations, convenience stores, arenas that host sports and entertainment events, bars even. For you, no ATM that isn't at a bank.



If you must shop online, buy pre-loaded MasterCards and Visas, in smaller increments. When an app on your phone, or any place on the internet, asks if you want to save your card information, the answer is always NO. Secure your home network and don't shop from locations off your network.



Cancel ALL autopay for at least six months, a year would be better. If you decide to restart at a later date, use different cards or accounts.



Zealously monitor your accounts. Let your bank know what's going on. Call your credit card companies, ask what security features are available and ask for their recommendations. Let them know why you are asking and let them know you are becoming proactive in fighting this problem.



Watch out for small purchases that aren't yours. They busted a foreign operation a few years ago that would make $5 charges, $9.95 and such with company names that look like you might use. Folks who frequented convenience stores and fast food places were ideal for their operation.



Pay off your credit cards. Much harder to defraud someone who doesn't carry debt on their cards.



Could be someone local, like the drive-thru clerk at Starbucks, or the waitress who took your card at Applebee's, or the girl that did your hair at the salon. Never let your card out of your sight. Easiest thing for these folks to do is to plug in a small swipe reader on their phones. 



Your diligence is the only way to stop this.






I believe one of the times occurred when a waitress disappear with my card.  Another, I cancelled it when someone went through my locker at work. One I believe was from buying something on line. And this last time was a Postal Delivery scam. How did they know I was waiting for something parishable? I was avised to have someone check my phone for spyware. Since this last episode, my phone won't hold a charge. 

csrat - Posted - 09/28/2022:  04:10:03


quote:

Originally posted by mander

quote:

Originally posted by csrat

quote:

Originally posted by mander


....




This is the fourth time in six months I've had to replace my card!






You're on someone's list. You need to make changes.



No use of a debit card, ever.



No use of gypsy ATM's. That would be ATM's not sponsored by a bank. The kind you find at gas stations, convenience stores, arenas that host sports and entertainment events, bars even. For you, no ATM that isn't at a bank.



If you must shop online, buy pre-loaded MasterCards and Visas, in smaller increments. When an app on your phone, or any place on the internet, asks if you want to save your card information, the answer is always NO. Secure your home network and don't shop from locations off your network.



Cancel ALL autopay for at least six months, a year would be better. If you decide to restart at a later date, use different cards or accounts.



Zealously monitor your accounts. Let your bank know what's going on. Call your credit card companies, ask what security features are available and ask for their recommendations. Let them know why you are asking and let them know you are becoming proactive in fighting this problem.



Watch out for small purchases that aren't yours. They busted a foreign operation a few years ago that would make $5 charges, $9.95 and such with company names that look like you might use. Folks who frequented convenience stores and fast food places were ideal for their operation.



Pay off your credit cards. Much harder to defraud someone who doesn't carry debt on their cards.



Could be someone local, like the drive-thru clerk at Starbucks, or the waitress who took your card at Applebee's, or the girl that did your hair at the salon. Never let your card out of your sight. Easiest thing for these folks to do is to plug in a small swipe reader on their phones. 



Your diligence is the only way to stop this.






I believe one of the times occurred when a waitress disappear with my card.  Another, I cancelled it when someone went through my locker at work. One I believe was from buying something on line. And this last time was a Postal Delivery scam. How did they know I was waiting for something parishable? I was avised to have someone check my phone for spyware. Since this last episode, my phone won't hold a charge. 






Good advice on the phone. Get it cleaned and if it still won't hold a charge, take it back to factory presets. If, after all that, it won't hold a charge, get a new phone. Don't transfer any information from the old phone. A new phone number would go well with the new phone.

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