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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Paid version of Tabledit?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/384545

jchipps_1 - Posted - 07/19/2022:  17:40:00


Can anyone tell me if the Paid version of Tabledit is user friendly, and easy to navigate to make some very basic banjo TABS?

I took a quick look at the DEMO, but it seemed kinda tedious.

Just curious if the paid version is easier and/or if the instructions are clear enough for a novice to make some basic tabs?

Thanks in advance!

dbrooks - Posted - 07/19/2022:  18:04:51


If you got the demo version that lets you create tabs up to 16 measures (not TefView which only allows you to view tabs), I think you have a pretty good idea pf the full version. I started with TabWin, a free program that is no longer supported. TablEdit is supported and gets frequent updates. I have continued to use TabWin because I am so fast with it. I bought TablEdit, but I haven't had the time to learn the program well. TablEdit reads Tabwin files, so I have a conversion path in the future. If I had known I was going to create lots of tabs for my students, my own use in learning new tunes and in response top requests on the Hangout, I would have started with TablEdit. In short, TablEdit is much more powerful, so there is more to learn in using it. TablEdit is the standard by which other tab software is measured.



David

Don Borchelt - Posted - 07/19/2022:  19:02:11


The difference between Tabwin and Tabledit is like the difference between having a shoebox containing a hammer, screwdriver, and a wrench, and a fully equipped workshop, with every power tool and hand tool imaginable. Yes, it's a lot easier to learn to use the three simple tools in the shoebox than it is to master the whole workshop full of wordworking tools. But what you can do with those three tools is a whole lot more limited. Matthew has completely changed the whole concept of what a tab is, and what it is capable of doing. Allow me to give you an example. The attached Tabledit tab is one I prepared for a bluegrass banjo student some years ago. It's J.D. Crowe's instrumental Blackjack. But the tab doesn't just include the banjo, it also has tab tracks for guitar, bass and mandolin. After the first couple of banjo breaks, the mandolin plays the lead, and the banjo tab presents the back-up.  I can't remember, but I may have simplified the back up, and maybe even the lead, based on the student's capabilities.  Anyway, with Tabledit, you can play the tab back via a MIDI playback at any tempo, so it becomes not just a visual transcription of what Crowe plays, but also a visual and audio practice tool, so the student could play along with the tab's MIDI playback function.  I had them start very slow, and as they got comfortable, gradually speed up the tempo, about 5 bpm at a time. You can't do that with Tabwin. I did dozens and dozens of lesson tabs this way, they were very effective learning tools.



Black Jack Tabledit Tab



Black jack MIDI at 120bpm

janolov - Posted - 07/20/2022:  01:44:11


I bought the full TablEdit in 2006 (I think it was USD 50) and I have never regretted it.



One disadvantage  is that TablEdit does not read your mind, and does exactly what you tell it to do. If you have wrong settings, or if you make writing errors the result will also be erroneous. I found it easy to learn those fundamental things when I started. 

Texasbanjo - Posted - 07/20/2022:  04:58:21


There's probably a learning curve to the Tabledit just like there was to learning banjo: it takes practice, practice, practice. Oh, and reading instructions.

jack_beuthin - Posted - 07/20/2022:  08:12:40


I've been using TablEdit for several years, and it is all second nature to me now. I recall some aspects of making a tab fairly intuitive, and some things a bit less so. But, generally whenever I hit a snag, I got my answer from the manual, or from here on the BHO (seasoned users are standing by to help!). Like with any software, once you learn some basic functions, it largely becomes a matter of establishing a procedure for making tabs.

The multi-track feature that Don described really is fantastic. It certainly is beyond "basic" tabbing, but once you learn how to use it, a whole new world opens up. I pretty much figured it out just by using the manual, and then just fooled around with it once I had the basics working for me.

I often will use TablEdit in combination with Transcribe!, which is slow-downer software. I'll just open both and my computer and position them side-by-side on my monitor. As I work through a new tune on Transcribe, I will work on the tab in TablEdit. I can work up a tune pretty quickly doing this.

There are also several YouTube tutorials, many listed on the TablEdit website, but none are banjo specific that I am aware of. They are still useful though.

I would say this--if you have figured out most of the functionality of the BHO (loading photos, tabs, videos, editing posts, ads, etc) then you will figure out TablEdit, and it will be worth the effort.

mikejboulder - Posted - 07/20/2022:  09:00:15


If you are creating tab, tabledit is the way to go. The software support is amazing and there are a lot of folks who can help you out if you get stuck. It is well worth the $50.

Bill H - Posted - 07/20/2022:  18:54:26


I found it to be a game changer.All of my hand written tabs are scattered around in folders and drawers. The Tabledt tabs are all in digital file that is easy to find or share. It is the best thing ever to write down an arrangement and the play it back so you can fine tune things or develop variations, and not have to hold it all in your head.

jchipps_1 - Posted - 07/22/2022:  17:06:16


Thanks everyone for all the replies ...

So i got the paid version of Tabledit and I was able to muddle my way through and make a fairly decent TAB for my 1st ever. Took me hours though! Lol (definitely not a real user-friendly program)

I do have a couple questions that i hope someone can answer:

1. Is there any way to insert TEXT above the Tab such as the words A Part, B Part etc.?
I couldn't find any option for doing that, but I'm fairly certain I've seen Tabledit Tabs with text such as that.

2. Is there a way to use T, I, M, as the right hand fingering, rather that T, 1, 2, ?
Seems I've seen that, but I couldn't find that option anywhere in Tabledit.

Thanks in advance for any help!

dbrooks - Posted - 07/22/2022:  18:43:04


Congratulations on making the jump. (Remember me - Im the one who bought TablEdit but still using the free program.)  Your investment will yield real dividends if you stick with it. Right away, you'll find that there are quite a few experienced TablEdit users who will be able to help you along the way.



David

FenderFred - Posted - 07/23/2022:  02:59:41


quote:

Originally posted by jchipps_1

Can anyone tell me if the Paid version of Tabledit is user friendly, and easy to navigate to make some very basic banjo TABS?



I took a quick look at the DEMO, but it seemed kinda tedious.



Just curious if the paid version is easier and/or if the instructions are clear enough for a novice to make some basic tabs?



Thanks in advance!






Like any piece of software there is a learning curve. I didn't find the instructions particularly user friendly but with trial and error, advice from other users I muddled through



Worth the investment ? Absolutely 

janolov - Posted - 07/23/2022:  11:22:15


quote:

Originally posted by jchipps_1

Thanks everyone for all the replies ...



So i got the paid version of Tabledit and I was able to muddle my way through and make a fairly decent TAB for my 1st ever. Took me hours though! Lol (definitely not a real user-friendly program)



I do have a couple questions that i hope someone can answer:



1. Is there any way to insert TEXT above the Tab such as the words A Part, B Part etc.?

I couldn't find any option for doing that, but I'm fairly certain I've seen Tabledit Tabs with text such as that.



2. Is there a way to use T, I, M, as the right hand fingering, rather that T, 1, 2, ?

Seems I've seen that, but I couldn't find that option anywhere in Tabledit.



Thanks in advance for any help!






1. There is a text manager. Look for the symbol T in the menu at the top. You can choose to insert text above or below the tablature and the notation.



2. There is a special tool for fingering. Look for the symbol that likes a hand.



You should also download the TablEdit Manual (pdf format). There you can search for "text manager" and "fingering" to read more.

jchipps_1 - Posted - 07/25/2022:  09:28:53


Thanks for the tips!

I’m still a little fuzzy on some things, but I’m starting to get the hang of it!

banjo_brad - Posted - 07/25/2022:  13:46:49


There are, somewhere, on-line tutorials for Tabledit. Join the Tabledit user group and browse around until you find a link or several.

Actually, go to the Tabledit Users page and click on the FAQ/Tutorials link.

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