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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Pappaw or Papaw


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/383916

LNEU - Posted - 06/17/2022:  06:49:58


Being relatively new to Grandfathering, I had to choose a name for my granddaughter to use. I chose to use Pappaw. Which I would pronounce as Pap-paw. Now the hard part, I have people (such as my wife) who insist the word is spelled with one "p" in the middle, not double "p". I would pronounce that Puh-paw. I know this is an age old problem but I don't want to be a Puh-paw. In your infinite wisdom, what say ye? (Hint..my wife is not from the South). Please help....

kd8tzc - Posted - 06/17/2022:  06:53:09


Well, sorry, I can't help much... my Grandbabies call me Papa, but that is morphing into Pop with one of them, another it is Paaapa, and one just makes monkey sounds when he see's me. Could be because I do the same to him and maybe he thinks that's how he is supposed to communicate with me. :)

Owen - Posted - 06/17/2022:  07:41:21


... just stick a bunch of diacritics (?)    merriam-webster.com/words-at-p...0letters.   in there to indicate the desired/proper/??  way.... and keep everybody happy.... or equally befuddled.   cheeky



Edit: But I do think it absolutely requires a schwa sound in at least one syllable.


Edited by - Owen on 06/17/2022 07:46:49

5B-Ranch - Posted - 06/17/2022:  07:44:30


I have a one of a kind name and it came from my granddaughter who at two had a hard time pronouncing her d’s that all came out sounding like g’s instead. She would call me ga gi like daddy but with the g as in Gage. Her dad was a drive by dude. (Don’t get me started on that piece of work). Anyway it morft in to my name Gagi and my wife is Mimi. But you guys can’t have it.



 



let the child name you it's more fun that way.


Edited by - 5B-Ranch on 06/17/2022 07:46:17

Owen - Posted - 06/17/2022:  08:27:09


  "....  more fun that way."



It's off onto a tangent, but I'm reminded of 'way back when I was trying to be a teacher.  A  Jr. High kid [from one of the smaller "feeder" (?)  communities] started the year with "Rawhide" as his nickname.  Mid-way thru the year it had morphed to  "Cowhide" .... by year end it was "Cows___t."     Fwiw, his last name started with C .... sounded as a "K,"  so maybe alliteration was a factor??

steve davis - Posted - 06/17/2022:  08:28:46


I called my Dad's father "Gramp".

Texasbanjo - Posted - 06/17/2022:  08:36:11


Why worry about how it's spelled? Your grandchild has a few years to grow before she needs to know how to spell your name. Either way will work.



Here's what Google/UTube has to saw about it: youtube.com/watch?v=tOJVgKccF3k. They spell it with 2 P's!!   And I don't agree with how they pronounce it.


Edited by - Texasbanjo on 06/17/2022 08:37:09

Old Hickory - Posted - 06/17/2022:  09:01:21


As a retired writer, I have several opinions (not necessarily expert) on this.



First is that one reason we have double consonants in English is to guide pronunciation. So I side entirely with you that Pappaw tells people to pronounce the name: Pap - paw.



I agree with your opinion that the first "a" in "Papaw" would not necessarily be pronounced the same as the first "a" in "Pappaw."   Pap and Pa do not sound the same.



Another opinion is that double consonants are common (if not typical) in names. Especially informal names, diminutive names and nicknames. More to the point, your name seems to be a combination of Pap and Paw. So why not double the "p"?



And my final opinion is that names break conventions of spelling all the time, so people who "insist" it's spelled "Papaw" are wrong.



Real final opinion: I don't think "Pappaw" breaks the conventions of spelling. I think it follows them.

Buddur - Posted - 06/17/2022:  09:11:06


I called my maternal grandfather "Pop Pop".

Thanks! Now you got me wondering if I said it wrong or are spelling it wrong.

5B-Ranch - Posted - 06/17/2022:  10:29:04


Don’t over think this the child will call you paw paw at first because it’s easier to pronounce. Correcting them will only frustrate the little one.

kd8tzc - Posted - 06/17/2022:  10:29:29


quote:

Originally posted by Old Hickory

As a retired writer, I have several opinions (not necessarily expert) on this.



First is that one reason we have double consonants in English is to guide pronunciation. So I side entirely with you that Pappaw tells people to pronounce the name: Pap - paw.



I agree with your opinion that the first "a" in "Papaw" would not necessarily be pronounced the same as the first "a" in "Pappaw."   Pap and Pa do not sound the same.



Another opinion is that double consonants are common (if not typical) in names. Especially informal names, diminutive names and nicknames. More to the point, your name seems to be a combination of Pap and Paw. So why not double the "p"?



And my final opinion is that names break conventions of spelling all the time, so people who "insist" it's spelled "Papaw" are wrong.



Real final opinion: I don't think "Pappaw" breaks the conventions of spelling. I think it follows them.






This is funny as it reminded me of a fellow that I knew back when the singer Prince went by that goofy symbol.  Anyhow, this fellow I know decided that his new name would now be spelled (and forgive me as I don't recall how he spelled it... it was just a bunch of consonants) "Ztrhgvbcsd" and he said it was pronounced "Jim".



As far as names go, I think you summed it up well Old Hickory, spell it however you want it spelled.

Old Hickory - Posted - 06/17/2022:  14:25:54


6+ years ago, our first granddaughter's name for me was a sound like "Dabm." The "a" as in Dad. I babysat her two days a week from 3 months to 15 months. Eventually, she learned to say Grandpa.



Before our grandson (third grandchild) could make the "gr" sound, he called me "Pampa." It may have been close to a year before he started saying Grandpa or Grampa.

donc - Posted - 06/17/2022:  17:03:16


I'm a 6th generation 'Grandpa'. Previous to that my ancestors spoke Scottish Gallic or Swedish so I really don't know the early history.

BanjoLink - Posted - 06/19/2022:  08:50:27


For my wife and I, our grandsons call us Papa and Nana ..... pretty easy for them to say. For the other grandparents it was Grandpa and Granny. They had to have some way to distinguish between the two sets.

stevebsq - Posted - 06/19/2022:  13:47:39


Whilst my daughter was carrying the yet unborn, unnamed boy I would ask “ how is Tater doing?”

I am now “Tot” for calling him Tater.

slammer - Posted - 06/19/2022:  14:43:54


Congrats Grandpa!!! We have 4 grandson’s , 2 are 6 and 2 are 4.
They all call us Grandpa and Gam Gam !!! Doesn’t matter what they call ya, it melts your heart………..until the shi# hits the fan!!!
Slammer!!!

raybob - Posted - 06/19/2022:  16:55:34


My mother's father was the only grandfather I knew. Everyone in the family, including the extended family, simply called him Paw. He immigrated here from Europe in 1910. I think he liked being called Paw by everyone.

Elmo_Smiley - Posted - 06/19/2022:  20:38:12


I called my grandparents on my mom's side, Elmer and Mildred. Um, that was their names. They preferred Grandma and Grandpa, but that never stuck. Didn't really see my dad's side that much.

My ex wife decided the grandkids would call her Mimi. So for fun, I told them to call me Pipi, (P-P). Just a joke, but it stuck.

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