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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: I could care less. Or could I??


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/380572

Doug Knecht - Posted - 01/15/2022:  17:39:53


Is it

“I could care less” or

“I couldn’t care less”. ????

Or could (n’t) anyone even care?

Omeboy - Posted - 01/15/2022:  18:17:17


Can a girl really be "awful pretty?"
(I know for a fact they can be pretty and awful.)

Paul R - Posted - 01/15/2022:  22:13:10


The correct verb is "couldn't".

It's another common misuse, like saying "normalcy" (wrong) for "normality", or "relevancy" (wrong) for "relevance".

Good Buddy - Posted - 01/15/2022:  22:54:21


"I could care less" doesn't make any sense, unless you are trying to say that you care too much. But what you are trying to say is that you really don't care at all, in fact, you couldn't care less.

5B-Ranch - Posted - 01/16/2022:  00:14:45


quote:

Originally posted by Paul R

The correct verb is "couldn't".



It's another common misuse, like saying "normalcy" (wrong) for "normality", or "relevancy" (wrong) for "relevance".






Well now let us look at this in a little more depth. What if you are saying the opposite of 'I could care more'. example: how I feel for  snakes. But instead I'm on the fence about my feelings for such vermin and chose to have less feelings than I do at that moment. So wouldn't  'I could care less' be a acceptable phrase? 

slammer - Posted - 01/16/2022:  04:36:08


Jimmy Crack Corn……….
Slammer!!!

stevebsq - Posted - 01/16/2022:  04:39:57


Newscasters..when I used to watch the news...would say about a missing person. “He went missing.” I do not know if that is grammatically correct..I just don’t like it.

Another non word...irregardless.

jason999 - Posted - 01/16/2022:  04:56:25


quote:

Originally posted by Doug Knecht

Is it



“I could care less” or



“I couldn’t care less”. ????



Or could (n’t) anyone even care?






I think a lot of people miss this one. 



You are on a big trip and your tire goes flat. You look at your wife and say, "well, that's just great!".



Does your wife think you are happy about the flat tire? Should you have actually said, "that's not great"? 



We routinely use sarcasm when we are indignant. 



Someone sees you struggling to change a motorcycle tire by hand. They walk up and say, you need a tire machine!



You come back with, "thank you, that's very helpful". Would the person think you were impressed with their advice? No.



What if someone points out your ex girlfriend, who is with another guy? 



You shrug your shoulders, roll your eyes and say, "I could care less", and then you walk away without giving it another thought. You are expressing complete indifference.  



Obviously, you could have said, "I couldn't care less". Either works.



 



 


Edited by - jason999 on 01/16/2022 04:59:45

DC5 - Posted - 01/16/2022:  05:32:17


Or as Lenny Bruce pointed out, "F You" is said as a curse, but if F is the act of love and procreation, wouldn't the proper curse be "UnF You"?

DC5 - Posted - 01/16/2022:  05:33:35


quote:

Originally posted by jason999

quote:

Originally posted by Doug Knecht

Is it



“I could care less” or



“I couldn’t care less”. ????



Or could (n’t) anyone even care?






I think a lot of people miss this one. 



You are on a big trip and your tire goes flat. You look at your wife and say, "well, that's just great!".



Does your wife think you are happy about the flat tire? Should you have actually said, "that's not great"? 



We routinely use sarcasm when we are indignant. 



Someone sees you struggling to change a motorcycle tire by hand. They walk up and say, you need a tire machine!



You come back with, "thank you, that's very helpful". Would the person think you were impressed with their advice? No.



What if someone points out your ex girlfriend, who is with another guy? 



You shrug your shoulders, roll your eyes and say, "I could care less", and then you walk away without giving it another thought. You are expressing complete indifference.  



Obviously, you could have said, "I couldn't care less". Either works.



 



 






Therefor one needs to hear the inflection in the voice because in text the sarcasm doesn't play, but vocally it does.  Kind of like Steve Martin's "Excuuuuuse Meeeee!"

jason999 - Posted - 01/16/2022:  06:06:04


quote:

Originally posted by DC5

quote:

Originally posted by jason999

quote:

Originally posted by Doug Knecht

Is it



“I could care less” or



“I couldn’t care less”. ????



Or could (n’t) anyone even care?






I think a lot of people miss this one. 



You are on a big trip and your tire goes flat. You look at your wife and say, "well, that's just great!".



Does your wife think you are happy about the flat tire? Should you have actually said, "that's not great"? 



We routinely use sarcasm when we are indignant. 



Someone sees you struggling to change a motorcycle tire by hand. They walk up and say, you need a tire machine!



You come back with, "thank you, that's very helpful". Would the person think you were impressed with their advice? No.



What if someone points out your ex girlfriend, who is with another guy? 



You shrug your shoulders, roll your eyes and say, "I could care less", and then you walk away without giving it another thought. You are expressing complete indifference.  



Obviously, you could have said, "I couldn't care less". Either works.



 



 






Therefor one needs to hear the inflection in the voice because in text the sarcasm doesn't play, but vocally it does.  Kind of like Steve Martin's "Excuuuuuse Meeeee!"






I know but this one is a little tricky. You want inflection or emotion to indicate sarcasm,  but pure indifference is deadpan and shows no emotion. I guess it comes down to looking at context.



After more thought, "I could care less" may be incorrect if the person is trying to speak literally. 



So, I guess the best answer to the original question is that it depends if the person is trying to be sarcastic or not.

gottasmilealot - Posted - 01/16/2022:  07:53:54


People that say "I don't think..." instead of "I think..." when telling you what they want to say.



It causes me to say "If that's not what you think, why are you telling me?"


Edited by - gottasmilealot on 01/16/2022 07:55:42

jason999 - Posted - 01/16/2022:  08:45:51


quote:

Originally posted by gottasmilealot

People that say "I don't think..." instead of "I think..." when telling you what they want to say.



It causes me to say "If that's not what you think, why are you telling me?"






I DON'T THINK ive heard that one. Maybe it's regional? Use it in a sentance.

ipik5 - Posted - 01/16/2022:  09:02:27


Sounds like a conversation between people that have been stuck on a deserted island together for way to long! Lol

5B-Ranch - Posted - 01/16/2022:  09:11:53


quote:

Originally posted by ipik5

Sounds like a conversation between people that have been stuck on a deserted island together for way to long! Lol






Ginger or Mary Ann..



I think maybe people are conflating the phrase "I don't think" with "I don't know". Even though think and know are associated within the brain,least I think it is but I don't know. 

Or.. a new idea/problem arises and the individual has not have time to ponder the situation formulating a acceptable conclusion therefore exposing the term I don't think. 


Edited by - 5B-Ranch on 01/16/2022 09:17:11

Owen - Posted - 01/16/2022:  09:25:32


Mr. Ranch: "I think maybe people are conflating the phrase "I don't think" with "I don't know".



I think, or don't think, as the case may be, that it has something to do with the placement of the negative..... but it's too far in the past and I'm too lazy to "look it up."    i.e. the diff between I don't think we should go in there,"  and "I think we shouldn't go in there." ???  



We encounter/perpetuate similar stuff w.r.t expectations for kid's behavio(u)r..... instead of telling 'em "Don't do such-and-such," apparently it's more productive to tell them what to do.

Owen - Posted - 01/16/2022:  09:30:03


Ooops.... that "double post thingy" has reared it's head again..... edited out the duplicate, and offer up a Canadian [not Canada] "sorry."


Edited by - Owen on 01/16/2022 09:32:40

bubbalouie - Posted - 01/16/2022:  09:48:13


Ive been hearing gotten a lot lately. It sounded wrong to me but apparently it's American English.

donc - Posted - 01/16/2022:  18:12:37


Thanks to the arrival of television during the 1950's Canadian kids learned how to speak American.

Paul R - Posted - 01/16/2022:  18:46:37


quote:

Originally posted by jason999

quote:

Originally posted by gottasmilealot

People that say "I don't think..." instead of "I think..." when telling you what they want to say.



It causes me to say "If that's not what you think, why are you telling me?"






I DON'T THINK ive heard that one. Maybe it's regional? Use it in a sentence.






I think, therefore I think I am.

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