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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Window Pains


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/379034

mike gregory - Posted - 11/10/2021:  15:08:33


Yes, I know it's a rotten pun.... but I'm a rotten punster.



Anyway, the situation:



Have several double-glazed windows, which have deteriorated to the point where they are fogging up inside, between the panes.



Cost umptypoo dollars to repair, so I'm wondering....



Would it be possible to seal the window edges,, take one of those special bits for drilling glass, make a wee hole down near one corner, and another up near the opposite side, pump in hot, dry air, and seal the holes?



Would, OF COURSE, try it on the smallest window, wait several months, see what's happening.



But if any of you KNOW that it wouldn't work, I can just bite the bullet and hire some window persons to fix it proper, right off the bat.


Edited by - mike gregory on 11/10/2021 15:09:02

Brian T - Posted - 11/10/2021:  15:42:50


I have a sliding balcony door, double glass and the seal is shot. Fogs up a lot in winter which is just too dang cold to mess with. And, the door wheel roller track is plugged and jammed as well. There's every chance that the 45 year old door sill under the track is rotting.

Neighbor had the same and last spring, had the whole business replaced with a glass hinged door.
Bonded plastic coated metal so that would be the end of scraping and painting the wood.
I kept telling myself to make a couple of calls and get it done but never got that far. Next spring.

I don't believe you can blow it dry. Most of those windows were sealed with dry nitrogen.
Call around, you might find a specialty outfit. I doubt that you and I are the only ones with this puzzle. Glass shops can makeup replacement units. I got one done that caught a baseball.

RonR - Posted - 11/10/2021:  17:55:32


It would probably just fog up again. They are filled with argon gas and can be repaired by a window manufacturer. Most new double hung vinyl windows cost around $250 for a new window and take about an hour to install.

bubbalouie - Posted - 11/10/2021:  18:30:26


When I was building windows & doors brand new sealed units would fail. There's no fixing them.



We need to know more about these windows. Do they open & close. Are they stationary. What size are they.



Can you work on them from outside?  

Paul R - Posted - 11/10/2021:  23:01:21


We were at a home show here a few years ago, and some company was saying they'd drill small holes that would allow some air circulation and end the fogging problem.

We had triple glazed windows installed and just beat the deadline for the Ontario rebate which Doug the Slug cancelled. But we couldn't afford to replace the windows in the kitchen/family room.

mike gregory - Posted - 11/11/2021:  07:38:11


I can't help but notice the windows on passenger jets have a breather hole, to prevent fogging.



Turns out it's NOT to prevent fogging.



huffpost.com/entry/the-real-re...b_8557246

dat - Posted - 11/11/2021:  08:58:53


quote:

Originally posted by bubbalouie

When I was building windows & doors brand new sealed units would fail. There's no fixing them.



We need to know more about these windows. Do they open & close. Are they stationary. What size are they.



Can you work on them from outside?  






Whew, way too many questions , working with windows you ought to be able to give a Carnac the Magnificent answer 



wink

mike gregory - Posted - 11/11/2021:  09:31:59


Fuller disclosure:
It's a property I'm in the process of buying, and the estimate was for $4,500.
So the seller, being a fair-minded fellow, offered to drop the price by $2,000!

So I offered to let him drop the price by $4,500.

Owen - Posted - 11/11/2021:  09:37:14


Mike: "Would it be possible to seal the window edges,, take one of those special bits for drilling glass, make a wee hole down near one corner, and another up near the opposite side, pump in hot, dry air, and seal the holes?"



Stuff like that sometimes rattles around in my noggin.  I figure that it should be possible, but under vacuum rather than pressure. Drill inlet/outlet holes in the aluminum (?) frame rather than the glass... suck the old air out and new "air" in.   Cover the whole perimeter [i.e. two drilled holes and other leaks] with something like a butyl strip wide enough to go from glass-to-glass.  Now, the new unit would be slightly bigger than the old one, so my next step would be to get a frame with the same outer dimensions and slightly bigger inner dimensions.   My final step is to leave it up to somebody else.  sad

bubbalouie - Posted - 11/11/2021:  10:42:20


Dat It's right there in the first line. I'm just trying to find out how hard it is t0 replace them.

richard baskowski - Posted - 11/11/2021:  11:08:22


if the sash is made of wood, they sometimes are made to come apart to change the glass. once apart you can get accurate size of glass, including width. for insulation purposes, (outside wall), order them filled with argon gas. the make and model would help figure out how far you have to go. if they are vinyl, you may have to replace the sash.

dat - Posted - 11/11/2021:  11:41:57


quote:

Originally posted by bubbalouie

Dat It's right there in the first line. I'm just trying to find out how hard it is t0 replace them.






I'm just messing with ya since you did that kind of work, 



kinda like when i go somewhere and people ask me car questions cause i used to work on cars,  they think i know all without looking at it


Edited by - dat on 11/11/2021 11:43:19

monstertone - Posted - 11/11/2021:  14:17:25


Without that vent hole in passenger jet windows, the air pressure between the panes would remain constant at 14.7 PSIA sea level. The air pressure at 30K ft being considerably less, those windows would explode were it not for those vent holes. Even though the cabins on passenger jets are pressurized, it is less than sea level pressure & it takes time to stabilize cabin pressure while changing altitude.  

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