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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: 23 Species gone forever


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/378141

DC5 - Posted - 10/04/2021:  08:45:01


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife service is declaring 23 species of birds, mussels, and fish to be off the endangered list and moved to the extinct list. Among these are the Ivory Billed Woodpecker and the Bachman’s warbler. Reasons for these recent extinctions are related to climate change, hunting, loss of habitat, and lack of conservation funding. I know that extinction is inevitable, but all of these 23 could have been avoided, and are directly attributed in one way or another to human activity. We are currently witnessing the 6th major mass extinction in the history of the planet, and the first one that humans are able to observe in real time. The last major extinction happened at the end of the Cretaceous Period of the Mesozoic Era (about 65 million years ago) and was believed to be caused by a meteor/asteroid crash.  It wiped out 75% of life on the planet.



You don't know what you've got 'till it's gone.



fws.gov/news/ShowNews.cfm?_ID=37017


Edited by - DC5 on 10/04/2021 08:45:57

phb - Posted - 10/04/2021:  08:50:45


AFAIK the current mass extinction is happening at a much faster rate than any previous mass extinction including the disappearing of dinosaurs.

DC5 - Posted - 10/04/2021:  09:04:40


quote:

Originally posted by phb

AFAIK the current mass extinction is happening at a much faster rate than any previous mass extinction including the disappearing of dinosaurs.






That's my understanding too, but I don't have a reference to back it up.  The information I gave only lists animal species found in the U.S. or it's territories.  It does not include plant species, nor species from other parts of the world. 

figmo59 - Posted - 10/04/2021:  09:44:54


I hear six billion people are at risk........

5B-Ranch - Posted - 10/04/2021:  10:24:31


The Ivory Bill woodpecker my be on the US Fish and Wildlife list but it’s has been seen and videoed in southeast Arkansas and in Louisiana. Google the hunt for the Ivory Bill. Does the list also include Sasquatch?


Edited by - 5B-Ranch on 10/04/2021 10:25:17

rinemb - Posted - 10/04/2021:  10:47:35


Hmmm, CC topic or extinction topic. This topic may be nearing extinction. ;-) Brad

5B-Ranch - Posted - 10/04/2021:  10:50:49


Not saying the books are cooked BUT as far as the Ivory-Bill it just so happens that earlier this summer I was on my way to our lake house on Toledo Bend lake when this large woodpecker flew across the road I got a good view of it and out of my mouth I said lord what a bird and low and be hold the nickname for the Ivory-Bill is the Good Lord Bird as in Good Lord what a Bird! I knew of the research that has been done near Brinkley Arkansas and watched several documentaries on this subject there is or was can’t find them at the moment links to video on the search. I will post links when I find them. The Ivory-Bill is still being investigated. Remember the Prehistoric fish that was supposed to be extinct? Actually the nickname for the Ivory-Bill is Lord God Bird. But I like the Good Lord what a bird name. 


Edited by - 5B-Ranch on 10/04/2021 11:03:37

Brian T - Posted - 10/04/2021:  10:53:26


Animal and plant populations go up and down. All sorts of different methods to measure the numbers.

To most people, "extinction" means that every last one of them is dead and gone.

You may see some but "extinction" also means that there are too few of them for the birth rate to replace the death rate. That there are so few of them that they can't even find mates any more!

I would expect to find a report quoting the original research in ScienceDaily.com.

rinemb - Posted - 10/04/2021:  10:55:06


I will pose as a question, please. Animals, especially the flying kind ought to be able to head north or head south to find a better climate for their survival and reproductive needs? After all, climate change-however it is occurring, has been somewhat gradual...been plenty of time to figure it out. Even Armadillo's have learned to head north from Texas-they are very common sites in Kansas now. Though they have not figured out that staying off the highways is a good thing.
I miss are old discussions. brad

ChunoTheDog - Posted - 10/04/2021:  11:01:12


I may be wrong, but I think the last mass extinction was at the period of transition between the late Pleistocene and the Holocene. So roughly 60,000 years ago.

Major changes in glacial activity (global cooling, and then global warming) essentially killed off nearly all large mammals + many others

ChunoTheDog - Posted - 10/04/2021:  11:03:07


quote:

Originally posted by rinemb

I will pose as a question, please. Animals, especially the flying kind ought to be able to head north or head south to find a better climate for their survival and reproductive needs? After all, climate change-however it is occurring, has been somewhat gradual...been plenty of time to figure it out. Even Armadillo's have learned to head north from Texas-they are very common sites in Kansas now. Though they have not figured out that staying off the highways is a good thing.

I miss are old discussions. brad






Yes but not all birds are migratory. Many of them are endemic to certain areas which are changing too fast for them to naturally figure it out.



Like asking the polar bears to just move farther north, doesn't work that way. 

GrahamHawker - Posted - 10/04/2021:  11:20:30


quote:

Originally posted by rinemb

I will pose as a question, please. Animals, especially the flying kind ought to be able to head north or head south to find a better climate for their survival and reproductive needs?






That will work for generalist species that have simple requirements and can adapt quickly to small differences. many species are specialists in terms of habitat and food resources.If you need a specidfic habitat that is not found futher south or north you have nowhere to go. If you live on mountains theres only so far up you can go before there is no more up. If you have camouflage for snow and there's no snow you're in more trouble. And there's no north to move to because there's 100s of miles of ocean in the way.

Texasbanjo - Posted - 10/04/2021:  11:20:59


The only way the animals will survive is to do away with the people. Are you ready for extinction? (and if you don't get the sarcasm, ask someone who does).

DC5 - Posted - 10/04/2021:  11:47:04


quote:

Originally posted by rinemb

I will pose as a question, please. Animals, especially the flying kind ought to be able to head north or head south to find a better climate for their survival and reproductive needs? After all, climate change-however it is occurring, has been somewhat gradual...been plenty of time to figure it out. Even Armadillo's have learned to head north from Texas-they are very common sites in Kansas now. Though they have not figured out that staying off the highways is a good thing.

I miss are old discussions. brad






If their food source does not also move north or south that creates another problem.  There is an issue in Europe where the starlings or swallows, I don't remember which, time their migration to coincide with the spring hatching of insects.  Birds migrate based mostly on light - the position of the sun - where insects hatch by temperature.  Insects are hatching earlier in the spring than the birds are arriving, so there is no food for the birds when they get there.  Plants are migrating both north, and up the sides of mountains, but plants are not motile, so they migrate at a much slower rate. 

ChunoTheDog - Posted - 10/04/2021:  11:49:45


quote:

Originally posted by Texasbanjo

The only way the animals will survive is to do away with the people. Are you ready for extinction? (and if you don't get the sarcasm, ask someone who does).






I honestly pray for the human extinction everyday.



I'm still waiting for that giant meteor to take us all out of this self-built misery. This planet deserves way better than humankind.

J.Albert - Posted - 10/04/2021:  12:01:26


Of "the 23 species", 9 were in Hawaii and 2 on Guam.



Of the remaining 12, 8 were mussels.



Of the remaining 4 in the mainland USA, 2 were bird species.



The last 2 were fishes.



Of the birds and fishes, the "last sightings" were in 1988 (bird) and 1983 (fish).



That was almost 40 years ago.

DC5 - Posted - 10/04/2021:  12:04:16


quote:

Originally posted by ChunoTheDog

I may be wrong, but I think the last mass extinction was at the period of transition between the late Pleistocene and the Holocene. So roughly 60,000 years ago.



Major changes in glacial activity (global cooling, and then global warming) essentially killed off nearly all large mammals + many others






That is the period when the 6th (current) extinction began.  We are still in the Holocene.  It is believed that the major cause of the extinction of the mega-fauna was caused by human hunting and habitat loss.  The extinction of the large mammals, mammoths, mastodons, giant sloths, saber tooth cats, etc. correlates with the migration and expansion in population of humans.  Though 60,000 years ago seems like a long time, it is a blink of an eye in the 4 billion year history of the planet.  The Triasic-Jurasic extinction, for example, happened over a period of 18 million years and wiped out about 1/2 of all living species.

ChunoTheDog - Posted - 10/04/2021:  12:23:46


quote:

Originally posted by DC5

quote:

Originally posted by ChunoTheDog

I may be wrong, but I think the last mass extinction was at the period of transition between the late Pleistocene and the Holocene. So roughly 60,000 years ago.



Major changes in glacial activity (global cooling, and then global warming) essentially killed off nearly all large mammals + many others






That is the period when the 6th (current) extinction began.  We are still in the Holocene.  It is believed that the major cause of the extinction of the mega-fauna was caused by human hunting and habitat loss.  The extinction of the large mammals, mammoths, mastodons, giant sloths, saber tooth cats, etc. correlates with the migration and expansion in population of humans.  Though 60,000 years ago seems like a long time, it is a blink of an eye in the 4 billion year history of the planet.  The Triasic-Jurasic extinction, for example, happened over a period of 18 million years and wiped out about 1/2 of all living species.






This is a dated explanation as of very recently from my understanding. I'll try and dig up some recent info, seems they've almost ruled that out.



 

Helix - Posted - 10/04/2021:  12:26:16


(. ):)===‘= : :}




kww - Posted - 10/04/2021:  12:38:23


If it's a trade, there are 74,224,319 Americans that I would happily trade for eight mollusks, two birds, and two kinds of fish.

ChunoTheDog - Posted - 10/04/2021:  12:41:41


quote:

Originally posted by kww

If it's a trade, there are 74,224,319 Americans that I would happily trade for eight mollusks, two birds, and two kinds of fish.






finally something we can agree upon, heck I'd trade everyone for 1 mollusk 

5B-Ranch - Posted - 10/04/2021:  12:48:30


I’m glad you two are not in charge death cult much?

rinemb - Posted - 10/04/2021:  13:09:54


quote:

Originally posted by kww

If it's a trade, there are 74,224,319 Americans that I would happily trade for eight mollusks, two birds, and two kinds of fish.






How are things going for you,so far... thanks to those 81,283,098 Americans. 

chuckv97 - Posted - 10/04/2021:  13:26:16


quote:

Originally posted by Paul R

quote:

Originally posted by chuckv97

Yeah, they’re probably cooking the books, just like everything else on the left wing, pinko side…… devil






Where's the sarcasm font when you need it?






.


Edited by - chuckv97 on 10/04/2021 13:26:59



 

Owen - Posted - 10/04/2021:  13:53:19


Re. sarcasm font.... the Cambridge dictionary has this to say: "the use of remarks that clearly mean the opposite of what they say, made in order to hurt someone's feelings or to criticize something in a humorous way."



IF it's the meaning is already "clear," wouldn't the use of a font create confusion?   .... double negative kinda thing? 



[Slow day here in Russell.... conjuring up a device for my wife to clamp wood that I "steal" from the municipal dump so as I can chain-saw it into firewood for camping.   Welded the uprights and now waiting for some glue on the 2X8 "bed" to dry.  ....For some odd-ball reason she doesn't particularly like holding the pieces by just putting her size 9s on 'em.  wink ]


Edited by - Owen on 10/04/2021 13:55:24

Texasbanjo - Posted - 10/04/2021:  14:12:01


I have hidden a political post and one quoting it. Let's leave politics out of our discussion, please.

Texasbanjo - Posted - 10/04/2021:  14:14:32


quote:

Originally posted by ChunoTheDog

quote:

Originally posted by Texasbanjo

The only way the animals will survive is to do away with the people. Are you ready for extinction? (and if you don't get the sarcasm, ask someone who does).






I honestly pray for the human extinction everyday.



I'm still waiting for that giant meteor to take us all out of this self-built misery. This planet deserves way better than humankind.






While I'm not happy with all humankind, I would never wish extinction or death on anyone, even my worst enemy.   



If you want to become extinct, I hope you get  your wish. 



Me?  I prefer to stay here as long as I'm physically and mentally fit.  

csrat - Posted - 10/04/2021:  21:36:48


quote:

Originally posted by 5B-Ranch

I’m glad you two are not in charge death cult much?






Nah. No death cult.



They're indulging in a popular, western culture activity called, "self-loathing". Makes them feel noble or somesuch.

Banjonewguy - Posted - 10/05/2021:  07:44:27


The Ivory Bill isn't extinct. I found one just now. wink





 



 

1935tb-11 - Posted - 10/05/2021:  07:46:01


in the last 20 years,,,, seems all common sense is extinct ! wink

rinemb - Posted - 10/05/2021:  07:52:09


quote:

Originally posted by 1935tb-11

in the last 20 years,,,, seems all common sense is extinct ! wink






Well....perhaps at the least, on the endangered species list, eh.  Brad

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