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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Making Viking Block and Peg Rims out of wood from a building torn down in 1


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/375130

GlennM - Posted - 05/19/2021:  09:34:12


I do not sell these so please dont e-mail me ect about buying.



Making Viking Block and Peg Rims out of wood from a building torn down in 1870.



 



johnahunter - Posted - 05/19/2021:  13:22:36


Great how you've found a way to get maximum use out of a scarce and valuable resource. Impressive craft as well.

Don Smith1959 - Posted - 05/19/2021:  16:50:55


that is some nice wood, if it is from 1880 I would think it would already be plenty seasoned though I cant figure out why you would have to season it anymore makes no sense since it has seasoned for over 100 years already.

Owen - Posted - 05/19/2021:  17:09:01


Thanks Glenn.... a clear straightforward video  yes .   You mention "Southern Banjo Co."    Do they make the whole banjo, or specialize in  cutting/fitting rims to rings and flanges and pass them on to other makers? I am unable to find a website for them.... do they have one?


Edited by - Owen on 05/19/2021 17:10:45

GlennM - Posted - 05/19/2021:  17:15:34


quote:

Originally posted by Don Smith1959

that is some nice wood, if it is from 1880 I would think it would already be plenty seasoned though I cant figure out why you would have to season it anymore makes no sense since it has seasoned for over 100 years already.






Hi Don



Most of the truck loads of wood I got first had been covered by tarps and rained on for a few years. So there are big chunks of rot in parts of  the 18 footer wet wood i save first. Truck loads more are in a warehouse and is dry so there is no hurry on bending it. Also I soak the wood before I bend it so if its wet it dont mater if it perfectly dry, but when making blocks it has to be as dry as the room.



 


Edited by - GlennM on 05/19/2021 17:17:13

GlennM - Posted - 05/19/2021:  17:19:22


quote:

Originally posted by Owen

Thanks Glenn.... a clear straightforward video  yes .   You mention "Southern Banjo Co."    Do they make the whole banjo, or specialize in  cutting/fitting rims to rings and flanges and pass them on to other makers? I am unable to find a website for them.... do they have one?






Sorry about that. Its the Sullivan Banjo Company.Is Sliver Hill Alabama.  I work for Eric Sullivan. Its all his wood . Even the soft maple I bend is all his wood. He makes great banjos and sells parts and stuff. RE:



RE: Do they make the whole banjo, or specialize in  cutting/fitting rims to rings and flanges and pass them on to other makers? I am unable to find a website for them.... do they have one?



Yes to all that.  He makes stuff for many many makers as well as his own brand. Look up Sullivan Banjo on Banjo Hangout any you will be amazed at the info here.



 


Edited by - GlennM on 05/19/2021 17:22:57

Owen - Posted - 05/19/2021:  17:35:45


Thanks, Glenn...... dunno whether I can pin it on your "southern" speech, or are my "northern" ears to blame? wink Now that you spell it out for me, I can hear it, and I note you did mention Sullivan in the opening.  All's well that ends well.

GlennM - Posted - 05/19/2021:  17:49:54


quote:

Originally posted by GlennM

quote:

Originally posted by Don Smith1959

that is some nice wood, if it is from 1880 I would think it would already be plenty seasoned though I cant figure out why you would have to season it anymore makes no sense since it has seasoned for over 100 years already.






Hi Don




There were trailer loads of 18 footers and truck loads of four footers on pallet that had been in the rain for years. They were not stickered thus tons of rot and moisture. I try to save all this wood first. Truck loads more are in a warehouse and is dry so there is no hurry on bending it. Also I soak the wood before I bend so if its wet it dont mater,  but when making blocks it has to be as dry as the room.




 


Don Smith1959 - Posted - 05/19/2021:  18:54:41


quote:

Originally posted by GlennM

quote:

Originally posted by Don Smith1959

that is some nice wood, if it is from 1880 I would think it would already be plenty seasoned though I cant figure out why you would have to season it anymore makes no sense since it has seasoned for over 100 years already.






Hi Don



Most of the truck loads of wood I got first had been covered by tarps and rained on for a few years. So there are big chunks of rot in parts of  the 18 footer wet wood i save first. Truck loads more are in a warehouse and is dry so there is no hurry on bending it. Also I soak the wood before I bend it so if its wet it dont mater if it perfectly dry, but when making blocks it has to be as dry as the room.



 






that makes sense now thank you for clearing that up



My wife and I purchased a house in Ohio back in 2009 that was built in 1889 all original wood through out 10 inch base boards and trim around the windows i completely re finished it, when I took all the base boards off and window trim it was all Tiger maple through out the house covered in what I found out was pigs blood mixed with something else it took me four years to strip everything including the floors which were solid oak on true 2x14 beams all the base boards and window trim, i stripped down to bare wood and refinished in clear it was beautiful when i finished, then my wife got to missing her kids and grand kids we ended up selling it and moving back to Arizona to an off grid property 


Edited by - Don Smith1959 on 05/19/2021 18:55:49

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