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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Adding neck scoop


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/368742

Joe the banjo guy - Posted - 09/16/2020:  06:04:15


I have a Mike Ramsey student model banjo. I ordered it originally without a neck scoop thinking I'd rather have the frets, but I like frailing over the neck more now than I did then. Would it be ok to have a luthier (assuming I can find one who would do it) add a scoop to the neck? Or is there some reason I'm not aware of that would make that a bad idea?

RBuddy - Posted - 09/16/2020:  06:39:55


Scoops are added to banjos all the time. They can be an issue if the fingerboard is thin and to get an effective scoop you would have to remove all the fingerboard wood. Especially if the neck has a truss rod installed right beneath the fingerboard.

mike gregory - Posted - 09/16/2020:  07:29:12


IF I wanted to be smartastical about it, I would point out that, in the strictest sense of the process involved, one is actually SUBTRACTING a neck scoop!



Luckily, I am very mellow about such things.



Sure, see a luthier.



Actually, some free advice:



EDIT your topic title to



"Need a banjo luthier near BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA" and that will grab the attention of people who KNOW of any.



I've done it myself, by running a razor blade along the edge of the frets, then  heating the frets, one at a time, with a soldering iron, then prying them out.



Then belt sand GENTLY down to where the fret lines disappear.



Either way, best wishes for a successful modification.

1xsculler - Posted - 09/16/2020:  12:03:11


What's neck scoop?

Joe the banjo guy - Posted - 09/17/2020:  10:19:07


I know some guitar luthiers and some violin luthiers in this area, and some bluegrass banjo luthiers, but nobody for whom this would be a familiar job (except one guy, whose health I've heard is in decline and is no longer taking jobs). I'd be tempted to ship it to someone who'd be more comfortable doing it. I certainly wouldn't be comfortable doing it myself. Biggest "surgery" i've done myself is installing spikes, and that was, uh, let's just say less than pretty.

mike gregory - Posted - 09/17/2020:  11:30:42


quote:

Originally posted by 1xsculler

What's neck scoop?






In the fashion industry, it's a method for getting an uneven tan on the chestal area.





In the banjo world, it's a low spot in the fingerboard, near the banjo body, to allow for playing over the fingerboard rather than over the head.





 



In either case,  it's a  lack  of material between the neck and the body, so it's pretty much the same meaning.



 



Ain't words FUN?!?!??! cheeky

G Edward Porgie - Posted - 09/17/2020:  12:16:13


I have to point out two things in Mike Gregory's comments.



The first is that although "adding a scoop" may, in fact bhe technically incorrect concerning the procedure (removing wood) it is actually correct in that by cutting away wood, one is actually adding a new feature to the neck.



Second, a neck scoop can in fact go down the back, so it is not necessarily a means for "an uneven tan in the chestal area." (Here, I have to indicate that Mike may be a bit of a boob by using the psuedo-word "chestal," which does not appear in my dictionary.)



I must also say that in England, a banjo neck can sometimes be called the "arm." That pretty much throws everything out of whack (defined as a sharp or resounding blow;  a condition: proper working order; the sound made by a sharp blow). I don't recall, offhand. that there is such a clothing feature as an "arm scoop," so the scoops compared by Mr. Gregory might not be the same.



At this point, I'll paraphrase his last sentence:



"Ain't words a PITA ?!?!??!"

Helix - Posted - 09/19/2020:  18:26:20


Tanks for da Mammaries

mike gregory - Posted - 09/19/2020:  18:46:36


quote:

Originally posted by Helix

Tanks for da Mammaries






Is great Soviet tradition!



Mothers defending home and family with any available tool.



Fingernails, rolling pins, T-34 Armored Vehicle, whatever they can get, they will use.



Helix - Posted - 09/20/2020:  05:10:59


Those vixen

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