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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Will this change life as we know it ? [future predictions]


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/362564

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donc - Posted - 03/28/2020:  21:12:55


In this country people are good about lining up for a cashier or getting on to a bus. I've seen other countries where they fight to get on a subway like they are leaving a burning building. I think it will go one step further in that a lineup will have an unwritten or written law of 4 feet between people. We have local restaurants where they crowd as many tables on the floor as they can. This will also change. Fast food joints usually have a box of knives, forks, straws etc.where people sink in their dirty fingers and touch 8 other utensils that others will be using. That will be gone as soon as they reopen. Cash will likely stay around for awhile but I can see the change going into a wash before it is given out again. Our paper money here is actually more like plastic. It can be washed and dried without damage. I can see the ATM machines cleaning the money as it goes through. People can buy gas at the pumps . I can see a bottle of hand cleaner hanging by the button pad. Riding a bus will be a challenge. When the bus gets busy you will still have that bulky passenger sliding in about 2 feet from your face. New busses will likely have a better design. Some people will be germaphobes for life and others will revert back to their original unsanitary way of life. I think most of us will be giving it a lot of thought from here on in.  The biggest change of all will be people's priority in choosing a government. We won't open that door  here and now but we know it will happen. 


Edited by - donc on 03/28/2020 21:18:59

dflowers - Posted - 03/28/2020:  21:18:55


More consideration towards each other? I think that might be ok.

nakigreengrass - Posted - 03/28/2020:  23:20:31


The current fashion for a certain "type" being easily triggered by micro aggression's is likely to take a hit.......and people without a proper grip on reality will now have a better understanding of what a "low carbon economy " actually looks like.


Edited by - nakigreengrass on 03/28/2020 23:25:10

Mooooo - Posted - 03/29/2020:  01:16:03


I see more people staying at home and plugging into the Matrix.

conic - Posted - 03/29/2020:  02:35:07


quote:

Originally posted by nakigreengrass

The current fashion for a certain "type" being easily triggered by micro aggression's is likely to take a hit.......and people without a proper grip on reality will now have a better understanding of what a "low carbon economy " actually looks like.






I dont get it, what are you really trying to say ?

Texasbanjo - Posted - 03/29/2020:  04:49:58


I'll play devil's advocate here: I think after all this is over and done with a lot of people will go back to exactly how they were and forget there ever was a virus. Those who were intimately affected by the virus will probably the the ones that remember and change.

rinemb - Posted - 03/29/2020:  05:06:12


My first thought is, how did people, communities and societies change following the Spanish/Kansas influenza plague? Hmmmm.
I think covid19 will have to get incredibly worst to have a long term change in USA.
Personally , I may carry forward a bit better hygiene habits,. And our toilet paper consumption may fall dramatically.
As to my personal economy, community economy, national and world economies. We may be already heading down the toilet?
Brad

From Greylock to Bean Blossom - Posted - 03/29/2020:  05:06:25


I'll agree with Sherry but with the exception that people are aware we are not totally in control no matter how much money we or our government have and that we are not bullet proof. How that will show itself, I am not sure.
ken

Tractor1 - Posted - 03/29/2020:  05:17:26


The first thing I noticed when the illegals from the south ,infiltrated ky. When a food truck came on the job, they did not'' form a line'' to pay for the goods. Just went to pointing their money at the attendant and rooting in like baby pigs rooting for a milk fountain. Of course they already jumped the immigration line at the border. If I grew up in their world I would be the same. A shame ,we just  need  about zillion years more to learn to try.


Edited by - Tractor1 on 03/29/2020 05:18:29

Banjo - Posted - 03/29/2020:  06:22:39


From Greylock to Bean Blossom - Posted - 03/29/2020:  06:39:59


quote:

Originally posted by donc

In this country people are good about lining up for a cashier or getting on to a bus. I've seen other countries where they fight to get on a subway like they are leaving a burning building. I think it will go one step further in that a lineup will have an unwritten or written law of 4 feet between people. We have local restaurants where they crowd as many tables on the floor as they can. This will also change. Fast food joints usually have a box of knives, forks, straws etc.where people sink in their dirty fingers and touch 8 other utensils that others will be using. That will be gone as soon as they reopen. Cash will likely stay around for awhile but I can see the change going into a wash before it is given out again. Our paper money here is actually more like plastic. It can be washed and dried without damage. I can see the ATM machines cleaning the money as it goes through. People can buy gas at the pumps . I can see a bottle of hand cleaner hanging by the button pad. Riding a bus will be a challenge. When the bus gets busy you will still have that bulky passenger sliding in about 2 feet from your face. New busses will likely have a better design. Some people will be germaphobes for life and others will revert back to their original unsanitary way of life. I think most of us will be giving it a lot of thought from here on in.  The biggest change of all will be people's priority in choosing a government. We won't open that door  here and now but we know it will happen. 






The biggest change of all will be people's priority in choosing a government. sadno



---------------------------------------------------



?!



----------------------------------------------------------------

From Greylock to Bean Blossom - Posted - 03/29/2020:  07:03:17


Donc

Sorry to not be clear. In the last few days Lynne had to remove posts for being poltical and Sherry had to shut a 10 page thread down. these are tying times for all. We can't work, can't be near some people, have to shop at weird hours, worry about even touching our face, and search for basics. We come to the hangout for a banjo fix, some relief and to meet good people.

The comment you made referred to a subject and we all know where you are coming from. and if the subject played out here, we all know what would be said because it has been hashed out by experts from each side on the national media. But this is not the place to rant or needle. So please don't throw a punch and then say, but I won't open that door, because you did. I know it is tough times and we all have strong opinions, but we need to follow the rules.

Thanks,

Ken



Ps I tried to delete my previous comment but spent too long in the bathroom. blush


Edited by - From Greylock to Bean Blossom on 03/29/2020 07:04:21

conic - Posted - 03/29/2020:  07:28:40


I also agree with Sherry, a lot of unnecessary great suffering and most people will quickly forget.
I have read it a lot and now really believe most people are suckers and will let their leaders get away with corruption.
They will never know that governments and police are not your friends, they dont care about you. they should be be working for you and spending your tax money to benefit you and your community, if they did we would not be in this mess.
Its funny that in england all of a sudden there is lots of money available and a plan to house all the homeless,

wizofos - Posted - 03/29/2020:  07:34:46


Going back to the original subject: Future predictions. I believe that more people are going to move out of the cities, more remote workers, maybe larger homes and families spending more time together. I can also see more stockpiling some extra food and supplies. Might see a rise in vacation homes large enough for the whole family. Call it an escape place.
9/11 caused some companies to leave downtown New York.

figmo59 - Posted - 03/29/2020:  07:40:58


quote:

Originally posted by Texasbanjo

I'll play devil's advocate here: I think after all this is over and done with a lot of people will go back to exactly how they were and forget there ever was a virus. Those who were intimately affected by the virus will probably the the ones that remember and change.






Complacency..is infectious..n contajuce..



 



Guilty me ..dam'ol self...,

Owen - Posted - 03/29/2020:  07:49:26


 

Originally posted by donc


Some people will be germaphobes for life and others will revert back to their original unsanitary way of life. I think most of us will be giving it a lot of thought from here on in.  The biggest change of all will be people's priority in choosing a government.


Don, do I have to choose one or the other?  If I'm forced to, I suppose I'd pick my former "unsanitary way of life."



I don't see any significant change in peoples' priorities in choosing a government, or most other aspects of life, for that matter... although my experience tells me that there's no end to the questionable [maybe even goofy] policies that "they" can dream up.   Maybe I gotta get out more.... [irony (?) intended]!! 


Edited by - Owen on 03/29/2020 07:50:34

Richard Hauser - Posted - 03/29/2020:  08:16:00


Humans have a short memory span. Politicians are saying the current Caronavirus situation will be memorized forever. I wonder just how many would bet their careers on the accuracy of that statement.

I think more people can and should work at home. But unfortunately the personal "druthers" of top management dictate policy, not rank and file. Unless tax advantages are given to organizations that do this, things will not change.

Taxes probably caused more business to leave New York State than the Twin Towers disaster. In fact, the Wall Street Journal almost left there. The tax situation in some northern parts of the U.S. caused companies to move their operations to states with more favorable tax rates and business practices.

I don't want to be a pessimist. But I do try to visualize things as they really area. I am also an older person, and realize that history tends to repeat itself. It has been said that if you remain unaware of your past mistakes, you will end up repeating these same mistakes.



I don't think the average family can afford vacation homes. I would not want to be a middle class family paying college tuition for their children. Property taxes are also very high in many areas. How about $10,000 a year - I am not joking.

Many city dwellers grew up with and expect the conveniences of city living. At the present time the number of people in rural areas is decreasing not increasing. And, they are moving to areas where there is more employment. Unless more employment opportunities are available in rural areas, large scale population alignment will not change. Last week I met at individual from a community not far from where I was raised. He remarked the population of the town he lived in had reduced by about 50%.

Texasbanjo - Posted - 03/29/2020:  08:34:36


Okay, politics got one of the virus threads locked. Looks like we're trying to get this one locked, too.

This is an interesting topic, please do not ruin it by talking politics.

donc - Posted - 03/29/2020:  08:50:15


quote:

Originally posted by From Greylock to Bean Blossom

Donc

Sorry to not be clear. In the last few days Lynne had to remove posts for being poltical and Sherry had to shut a 10 page thread down. these are tying times for all. We can't work, can't be near some people, have to shop at weird hours, worry about even touching our face, and search for basics. We come to the hangout for a banjo fix, some relief and to meet good people.

The comment you made referred to a subject and we all know where you are coming from. and if the subject played out here, we all know what would be said because it has been hashed out by experts from each side on the national media. But this is not the place to rant or needle. So please don't throw a punch and then say, but I won't open that door, because you did. I know it is tough times and we all have strong opinions, but we need to follow the rules.

Thanks,

Ken



Ps I tried to delete my previous comment but spent too long in the bathroom. blush




 



Dear Mr.. Beanblossom..   There is an elephant in this big room that isn't going to leave. We can surely avoid the topic where it is forbidden here but to call it a punch would only be to admit you don't see the feasibility of massive change. All governments and all political parties are aware [including mine] and so is your's.  I'm sorry you feel personally offended. 


Edited by - donc on 03/29/2020 08:54:27

From Greylock to Bean Blossom - Posted - 03/29/2020:  09:31:46


quote:

Originally posted by donc

quote:

Originally posted by From Greylock to Bean Blossom

Donc

Sorry to not be clear. In the last few days Lynne had to remove posts for being poltical and Sherry had to shut a 10 page thread down. these are tying times for all. We can't work, can't be near some people, have to shop at weird hours, worry about even touching our face, and search for basics. We come to the hangout for a banjo fix, some relief and to meet good people.

The comment you made referred to a subject and we all know where you are coming from. and if the subject played out here, we all know what would be said because it has been hashed out by experts from each side on the national media. But this is not the place to rant or needle. So please don't throw a punch and then say, but I won't open that door, because you did. I know it is tough times and we all have strong opinions, but we need to follow the rules.

Thanks,

Ken



Ps I tried to delete my previous comment but spent too long in the bathroom. blush




 



Dear Mr.. Beanblossom..   There is an elephant in this big room that isn't going to leave. We can surely avoid the topic where it is forbidden here but to call it a punch would only be to admit you don't see the feasibility of massive change. All governments and all political parties are aware [including mine] and so is your's.  I'm sorry you feel personally offended. 






Mr. Donc, I am not offended, but thank you for apologizing.  But it seems like you continue. You say I can't see the feasibility of what you introduced and you can't explain it without being in more open violation. Yet you mentioned it as "The biggest change of all" in your inaugural post on your thread. and then in reply you bring up "All government and political parties" and this is after being warned by Sherry. Man, I was trying to steer clear and let most of your interesting stuff be talked about. But I will unsubscribe from this although the non political stuff would be an interesting.



Good luck.



ken

From Greylock to Bean Blossom - Posted - 03/29/2020:  09:34:34


quote:

Originally posted by Texasbanjo

Okay, politics got one of the virus threads locked. Looks like we're trying to get this one locked, too.



This is an interesting topic, please do not ruin it by talking politics.






Sherry, If I was part of this know that I am off this thread so my take on it will not be a factor in the future.



Ken

banjo bill-e - Posted - 03/29/2020:  10:34:08


The reactions to this pandemic will change "money" as many of us know it, it that all spending restraints have been removed and the future of the US Dollar is now in uncharted territory. That is economics, not politics, and it won't matter who is in charge as whoever is making decisions will be facing new as yet unknown constraints even as they are freed from traditional ones. But I do not believe that we will be returning to the old normal and I fear that there is going to be some distress as we discover the new normal.

Texasbanjo - Posted - 03/29/2020:  10:50:34


quote:

Originally posted by banjo bill-e

The reactions to this pandemic will change "money" as many of us know it, it that all spending restraints have been removed and the future of the US Dollar is now in uncharted territory. That is economics, not politics, and it won't matter who is in charge as whoever is making decisions will be facing new as yet unknown constraints even as they are freed from traditional ones. But I do not believe that we will be returning to the old normal and I fear that there is going to be some distress as we discover the new normal.






It will change in the fact that it will take our children and grandchildren many years to repay.   Other than that, I don't see much changing in our spending habits or anything else.  People will continue to do as they have "before coronovirus".  Just my humble opinion based on years of just that happening without a pandemic. 

BanjoLink - Posted - 03/29/2020:  11:13:43


I do think things will go back to like they were ..... they always do. We change with the times and things will change, but they would have changed anyway. Younger generations are just different. They are not as interested in owning things and have different priorities, but that has nothing to do with the virus. I disagree with Brad (I rarely do) about the economies going down the toilet. The US economy will come back strong ..... like it always do.

Having known and having dealt with many bankers, as others here have as well, I often laugh at how conservative they become when our economy is bad, won't lend money to anyone (I know I'm exaggerating) and then when things turn back around they will lend money like it is going out of style. My best friend, formerly a banker, is still wondering what happened to the helicopter his bank lent money for to one of their clients. They finally wrote it off! Bankers have short memories and I think we will too.

banjo bill-e - Posted - 03/29/2020:  11:14:38


Sherry, I am not sure the current, and near-future (we are NOT done spending!) debt is repayable in the conventional sense.

conic - Posted - 03/29/2020:  11:24:44


quote:

Originally posted by m06

quote:

Originally posted by conic



>I have read it a lot and now really believe most people are suckers<

 






Uhh, except your theory fails to factor that the rest of us ‘suckers’ can read too. And consequently falls spectacularly over it’s own shoelaces before your ‘analysis’ even gets it’s tracksuit off, let alone stumbles up to a hurdle. 



The unintentional comedy while in this current lock-down is good though. laughlaughlaugh






Err, you are the comedy and Im not locked down.kissdevilcryingenlightened

Brian T - Posted - 03/29/2020:  11:33:13


We've had an economy which fed the financially obese.
As long as their appetite continues to control the feed,
my guess is that we will go back to the script of the past.

It's been suggested for a long time that humans retain little memory of pain.
I can't see this being any different.

chuckv97 - Posted - 03/29/2020:  11:56:00


quote:

Originally posted by Brian T

We've had an economy which fed the financially obese.

As long as their appetite continues to control the feed,

my guess is that we will go back to the script of the past.



It's been suggested for a long time that humans retain little memory of pain.

I can't see this being any different.






But, but...I've been told the financially obese are the ones that create jobs.

J.Albert - Posted - 03/29/2020:  11:59:45


I agree with Sherry's comment above about "going back to where we once belonged".



Some things that were done because of "the virus" may remain, however.

I'm thinking those plastic "barriers" at supermarkets and drug stores may just stay up.



We might even see some retail places mandate the use of gloves for cashiers, etc.

DC5 - Posted - 03/29/2020:  12:25:49


It is not possible to foresee, or prepare for all contingencies. I remember once when I was in software development that at a meeting one of the execs asked, "What unforeseen things haven't you thought of that could delay this?" He did not appreciate my saying that an asteroid could hit the building, or a Godzilla like monster could destroy the town and infrastructure. Just like the events of 9/11 could not be predicted, neither could this pandemic. All the recent pandemics were quickly resolved, and might have been devastating to small regions, (think Ebola), by the time they went global we had a good handle on them. We have dealt with influenza pandemics for many years, and with the exception of the 1918 flu, none have been this overwhelming. This years flu has killed many more people than COVID-19, but it did not totally overwhelm the medical system, nor did it infect as many people as quickly. So how do you prepare? There is a cry for masks and ventilators, and they are critical, but prior to this outbreak there was a sufficient supply of both. Do we stockpile 1,000 times what is normal, just in case? And what if we do? Rubber seals and elastic bands dry out and are no longer useful. This is what they found with many of the masks that have been donated by construction firms, the elastic is worn and the masks can't be worn. How do we prepare for that? Do we build hermetically sealed storage sheds and either vacuum out the air or fill them with nitrogen to prevent ozone from deteriorating the rubber components? If we build all the ventilators that are needed, what do we do with them after the pandemic subsides?
I think some steps that should be taken. All individuals should always have supplies in case of emergency. FEMA suggests 72 hours, I suggest 2 weeks. But even this is not possible for everyone. If you have a small apartment, storing 2 weeks of emergency rations, water and medical supplies is very difficult. Not to mention toilet paper. All countries should make sure they are not totally reliant on another country for all their supplies. Single points of failure will always bring down a system. The whole world right now is dependent on China. This may be fine for luxuries, but should not be OK for necessities. If Apple wants to put all their eggs in the China basket, fine, but we should not be dependent on China for medical equipment, safety equipment, and other emergency supplies. This is the major hope that I have going forward. Whether it takes subsidies, or tariffs, local manufacturing of necessities must be preserved.
What I believe will happen, is that in less than 5 years we will be right back where we were in October of 2019.

donc - Posted - 03/29/2020:  12:32:45


Major things like wars, depressions, and natural disasters permanently change policies. In my humble observation I would classify this as a major event. If I lived in Baffin Island, Antarctica, or Mayberry I would probably not be so concerned. As it is I live in a city where 12 people have recently died from an infection originating at a retirement home 2 blocks from here. Living around any North American city would be a cause for concern. There will always be a few who have a very limited concept of sanitation. Fortunately most of them don't influence public policy.

nakigreengrass - Posted - 03/29/2020:  12:46:22


Enthusiasm for globalization will likely take a hit......local manufacturing of essential products will be a good place to invest your money.

steve davis - Posted - 03/29/2020:  12:50:04


I believe a big change will be how we treat our poorest people.

A huge change might be kibutz-style local farms.



Cabins to live in and a school for the kids.Nothing that hasn't been done before.In the past we used  prisoners as with our old Thomaston farm.Seems like the homeless might be more willing workers.



Seems like this could be tweaked to give folks a better life than out on the street.

With a good number of participants no job would be too dificult.

There's nothing healthier than eating local,top shelf produce.


Edited by - steve davis on 03/29/2020 12:52:09

nakigreengrass - Posted - 03/29/2020:  13:26:11


quote:

Originally posted by conic

quote:

Originally posted by nakigreengrass

The current fashion for a certain "type" being easily triggered by micro aggression's is likely to take a hit.......and people without a proper grip on reality will now have a better understanding of what a "low carbon economy " actually looks like.






I dont get it, what are you really trying to say ?




 



1....Over sensitive young people ( or any age )  that are now being confronted by a grave thread, are likely to ...harden up.



2...Climate alarmists that demand world zero carbon energy reforms are being shown an example of what that actually means in practical terms.







 

banjo bill-e - Posted - 03/29/2020:  15:21:21


Paul posted---".Climate alarmists that demand world zero carbon energy reforms are being shown an example of what that actually means in practical terms.---"

And Paul, do you not think that some of the above are quite happy right now? For those few who see the climate issue as a means to an end, this crippled world economy IS the desired end.

nakigreengrass - Posted - 03/29/2020:  16:31:27


quote:

Originally posted by banjo bill-e

Paul posted---".Climate alarmists that demand world zero carbon energy reforms are being shown an example of what that actually means in practical terms.---"



And Paul, do you not think that some of the above are quite happy right now? For those few who see the climate issue as a means to an end, this crippled world economy IS the desired end.






I suppose it depends on how deluded their world view is.    I recently had the scary experience of pointing out the reality to a climate university lecturer, that, what ever plastic bags you use will not make a blind bit of difference to atmospheric CO2....that person seemed to be completely unaware of the existence of the industrial monster that makes her life so comfortable.   This is a person that is teaching NZs top brains of the future...very worrying.

BanjoLink - Posted - 03/29/2020:  16:40:28


quote:

Originally posted by DC5

It is not possible to foresee, or prepare for all contingencies. I remember once when I was in software development that at a meeting one of the execs asked, "What unforeseen things haven't you thought of that could delay this?" He did not appreciate my saying that an asteroid could hit the building, or a Godzilla like monster could destroy the town and infrastructure. Just like the events of 9/11 could not be predicted, neither could this pandemic. All the recent pandemics were quickly resolved, and might have been devastating to small regions, (think Ebola), by the time they went global we had a good handle on them. We have dealt with influenza pandemics for many years, and with the exception of the 1918 flu, none have been this overwhelming. This years flu has killed many more people than COVID-19, but it did not totally overwhelm the medical system, nor did it infect as many people as quickly. So how do you prepare? There is a cry for masks and ventilators, and they are critical, but prior to this outbreak there was a sufficient supply of both. Do we stockpile 1,000 times what is normal, just in case? And what if we do? Rubber seals and elastic bands dry out and are no longer useful. This is what they found with many of the masks that have been donated by construction firms, the elastic is worn and the masks can't be worn. How do we prepare for that? Do we build hermetically sealed storage sheds and either vacuum out the air or fill them with nitrogen to prevent ozone from deteriorating the rubber components? If we build all the ventilators that are needed, what do we do with them after the pandemic subsides?

I think some steps that should be taken. All individuals should always have supplies in case of emergency. FEMA suggests 72 hours, I suggest 2 weeks. But even this is not possible for everyone. If you have a small apartment, storing 2 weeks of emergency rations, water and medical supplies is very difficult. Not to mention toilet paper. All countries should make sure they are not totally reliant on another country for all their supplies. Single points of failure will always bring down a system. The whole world right now is dependent on China. This may be fine for luxuries, but should not be OK for necessities. If Apple wants to put all their eggs in the China basket, fine, but we should not be dependent on China for medical equipment, safety equipment, and other emergency supplies. This is the major hope that I have going forward. Whether it takes subsidies, or tariffs, local manufacturing of necessities must be preserved.

What I believe will happen, is that in less than 5 years we will be right back where we were in October of 2019.






Outstanding comments Dave ..... and right on point!

banjo bill-e - Posted - 03/29/2020:  16:42:49


---"unaware of the existence of the industrial monster that makes her life so comfortable.--"

She has plenty of company. We tend to not know what we've got until we lose it.

paco0909 - Posted - 03/29/2020:  16:44:56


You guys continue to be tiresome and overtly political. Time to move on and play some banjo.

Cornflake - Posted - 03/29/2020:  20:42:14


Over the years I have heard or read very little about the Spanish flu pandemic that killed 50 million people world wide. That's at a time when there there were a lot fewer people inhabiting this planet. Our school books didn't mention it. My parents never mentioned it (They were born a decade later). It just seems like a footnote in history. But it must have been a huge issue. Maybe it was swept under the rug because it didn't involve armies, sinister powers, and bombs. I tend to agree with Sherry that not a lot will change. I do hope that people will become less hyper-individualistic and more compassionate toward their fellow humans and the environment.

DC5 - Posted - 03/30/2020:  05:02:52


quote:

Originally posted by paco0909

You guys continue to be tiresome and overtly political. Time to move on and play some banjo.






Why are you reading this thread if it bothers you so?

Tobus - Posted - 03/30/2020:  05:46:04


Hopefully, one thing that will change after all of this is that people who are "preppers" won't be considered quite so crazy any more. While some of them do indeed take it a bit far, our society has gotten way too comfortable with modern conveniences and a stable supply chain. The wisdom learned by the generation who survived the Great Depression has been all but lost. Perhaps this pandemic will restore a little bit of it, to the point where people realize that they should not be so dependent.

Specifically, I think some people (not all, and perhaps not even a majority) will go forward with a plan to have some monetary savings, some supplies, and knowledge on how to get by without certain things. The extent of these will vary from person to person, of course. But the longer this crisis drags on, and the more disruption it causes, the more it will permanently change some peoples' habits.

flyingsquirrelinlay - Posted - 03/30/2020:  08:10:37


I don't think any of us can specifically predict what changes will occur any more than my parents could have anticipated the consequences of the Great Depression which significantly altered the relationship between the state and its citizens (what each owed the other to facilitate and ensure the safety/survival of both). I think this should help to unite people along their common nonpolitical self-interests, such as health, the availability of the medical community in times of duress, our need to plan and prepare at some level for that moment whenever it might occur. This is strategic planning and there's no better example of it than our strategic defense policy (though I am a pacifist and oppose militarism and jingoism). Somehow we have to prepare for the worst even as we work to avoid that sorry and tragic conclusion. I'm not religious, but I will say God Bless.


Edited by - flyingsquirrelinlay on 03/30/2020 08:13:06

steve davis - Posted - 03/30/2020:  08:13:31


I'm not on some list of "preppers".Is that supposed to be a term of derision?
I applaud anyone "prepping" for the worst.
I like hiding in the woods because that's where my home is.

Maine's entire population is just a tad over a million.
My St. George peninsula (a couple of towns and many villages) is sparsely populated with most residents very used to living with few resources and a boatload of common sense having to do with fending for ourselves,helping anyone struggling and keeping a level head when things get scary.
Patience (staying home) is not only a virtue...it's a life-saver.

This will last until it's over and nobody can read the future.

steve davis - Posted - 03/30/2020:  08:56:02


I believe this could change the way we depend on currency.
We can only bail things out for so long.
Bartering could show a strong comeback.

banjo bill-e - Posted - 03/30/2020:  09:27:12


When bartering replaces currency then starvation will become the new normal. This world cannot feed itself on a barter economy, just as this modern world cannot function as a medieval village. The great worldwide decreases in famine and extreme poverty over the last four decades is only made possible by a robust world economy. Plunging back into modes of subsistence living would be a death sentence for millions of the most vulnerable. Specialization of labor, and trade, are the engines of our prosperity. One should not be too eager to toss that aside unless a life of hard labor for a meager survival is the goal.

Owen - Posted - 03/30/2020:  09:38:57


Much merit in what you say Bill, although I don't see it as an all-or-nothing choice.  I seem to recall having been down this road before??    wink   

johnedallas - Posted - 03/30/2020:  09:59:59


Mike,
Some good points in your post!
I was born and reared in the immediate post-war period in the British part of Ireland, and I well remember my father harvesting carrots, lettuce and potatoes from our allotment garden. I also remember him keeping large areas of grass in check with a scythe - no, not a motor one, a "manual" one. My wife, who grew up in post-war Germany has memories of her grandmother preserving all the fruit from a big garden.
For my wife and myself, these are distant memories of another world. But on the other hand, when we watch how our grandchildren are brought up, and what kinds of toys they have, we realise that we are far ahead of them in what they call "sustainability" - a word we'd never heard of until recently, but which does describe our rather fuddy-duddy lifestyle.

As to changes after Corona - our German Chancellor called it the biggest challenge to society since WWII, and male European leaders have all said things to the effect that we're at war with the virus. And indeed it is an enemy from without, implacably bent on inflicting injury on us; we have deployed our best-trained "troops" - doctors and nurses, backed by the boffins in virology - many of whom have or will become "casualties" of the war. Some day, we may have to borrow Churchill's phrase, "Never was so much owed by so many to so few," when mentioning the medical services.
And post-war is always different from pre-war. With WWI, we saw the monarchies giving way to the republics, and women proving that they could do a man's job. WWII saw the end of the British Empire, and the start of European unification, which is ongoing, despite setbacks. In my generation, you Americans experienced a change of attitude after the Vietnam War.
These things would probably have happened sooner or later anyway, but the exceptional situation forced us to try out the new ideas, and no doubt expedited their adoption.
What will we learn during this "war?"
For one thing, that you don't have to get into your big diesel SUV all by yourself and drive half an hour or more to your work and the same back - you can work from home. The plight of the commuters has always been an impediment to corbon-reduction policies. Maybe we can save the climate after all!
Or perhaps families will learn that, when parents and kids are all home at the same time, you can play games and eat together.

I'm quite sure that some things will change - hopefully for the better!
Cheers,
John

DC5 - Posted - 03/30/2020:  10:17:55


quote:

Originally posted by johnedallas

Mike,

Some good points in your post!



Or perhaps families will learn that, when parents and kids are all home at the same time, you can play games and eat together.



I'm quite sure that some things will change - hopefully for the better!

Cheers,

John






Sure hope this one sticks.  Nothing better than a family sitting around the dinner table with no electronic distractions.  Families playing games together, also very good.



For my son's last Christmas, before moving half way across the country, he requested no gifts, but that we play board games and rent a video.  Was probably one of the nicest Christmases ever. 

BanjoLink - Posted - 03/30/2020:  12:52:58


quote:

Originally posted by DC5

quote:

Originally posted by johnedallas

Mike,

Some good points in your post!



Or perhaps families will learn that, when parents and kids are all home at the same time, you can play games and eat together.



I'm quite sure that some things will change - hopefully for the better!

Cheers,

John






Sure hope this one sticks.  Nothing better than a family sitting around the dinner table with no electronic distractions.  Families playing games together, also very good.



For my son's last Christmas, before moving half way across the country, he requested no gifts, but that we play board games and rent a video.  Was probably one of the nicest Christmases ever. 






Funny Dave, but my son's family (with a 3 and 5 year old boys) has started with more family games during their visits to our house and our visits to theirs.  Many are educational "memory" games, but then some are games like Jenga, which can be a learning experience also.  For my oldest grandson's birthday, my wife gave him word flashcards.  They still have too many toys, but they are making progress.  We are also lucky that the two grandsons love being outside .... especially doing athletic stuff .... baseball, basketball, soccer, and sliding down a grass/mud hill in cardboard boxes.

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