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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: The art of communication


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5strings3picks1banjo - Posted - 02/24/2020:  17:26:00


What has happened to the art of communication, texting, emails, sales adverts, letter writing etc.



Far too often I am second guessing what people are saying.

Many times there is no punctuation or short responses, which could be taken as angry or aggressive.



So many people selling things with no explanation of details such as sizes, damaged, missing parts etc.



The way people word things in text does not make sense so I am left guessing have they made an error or predictive text changed their words and they haven't proof read.



I get very frustrated when trying to buy things via text.

Sometimes I just abandoned the conversation and look to buy elsewhere and sometimes I explain to the person that they are unclear and not coming forward with detailed explanations. That makes them angry, but sometimes I feel they need to be told.



Old time letter writing was an art and I miss that in our modern life.



Am I alone here?



Edited after valid input from first comment.


Edited by - 5strings3picks1banjo on 02/24/2020 18:13:01

OldNavyGuy - Posted - 02/24/2020:  17:48:20


quote:

Originally posted by 5strings3picks1banjo

What has happened to the art of communication, texting, emails, sales adverts, letter writing etc.

Far too often I am second guessing what people are saying.

Many times there is no punctuation or short responses, which could be taken as angry or aggressive.

So many people selling things with no explanation of details such as sizes, damaged, missing parts etc.

The way people word things in text does not make sense so I am left guessing have they made an error or predictive text changed their words and they haven't proof read.

I get very frustrated when trying to buy things via text.

Sometimes I just abandoned the conversation and look to buy elsewhere and sometimes I explain to the person that they are unclear and not coming forward with detailed explanations. That makes them angry, but sometimes I feel they need to be told.



Old time letter writing was an art and I miss that in our modern life.



Am I alone here?






Using paragraphs instead of a "wall of text" is helpful for the reader.



 

5strings3picks1banjo - Posted - 02/24/2020:  18:02:26


quote:

Originally posted by OldNavyGuy

quote:

Originally posted by 5strings3picks1banjo

What has happened to the art of communication, texting, emails, sales adverts, letter writing etc.

Far too often I am second guessing what people are saying.

Many times there is no punctuation or short responses, which could be taken as angry or aggressive.

So many people selling things with no explanation of details such as sizes, damaged, missing parts etc.

The way people word things in text does not make sense so I am left guessing have they made an error or predictive text changed their words and they haven't proof read.

I get very frustrated when trying to buy things via text.

Sometimes I just abandoned the conversation and look to buy elsewhere and sometimes I explain to the person that they are unclear and not coming forward with detailed explanations. That makes them angry, but sometimes I feel they need to be told.



Old time letter writing was an art and I miss that in our modern life.



Am I alone here?






Using paragraphs instead of a "wall of text" is helpful for the reader.



 






Ok I will take that. :) 



I was rushing in my lunchtime.



See how easy it is to be frustrating for someone who has to read the comment.

5strings3picks1banjo - Posted - 02/24/2020:  18:03:18


Not saying I have the art, but I try.

bubbalouie - Posted - 02/24/2020:  18:28:10


I used to write letters to friends & relatives. It's always nice to get one back. I used to write to a girl that had a typewriter that had a cursive setting. Hand typed handwriting! 

chuckv97 - Posted - 02/24/2020:  18:32:58


Way before internet and texting we read poems in Mrs. Lindsay’s Grade 12 English class that I absolutely had no clue what they were about. And then, of course, we have Jack Kerouac....

mike gregory - Posted - 02/24/2020:  19:39:02


You are not alone.
I appreciate a well composed message, and try to compose mine as best I can.

But I am old, and you and I may be remnants of a vanishing species.

Paul R - Posted - 02/24/2020:  21:02:54


I have a couple of boxes of correspondence from back in the day. It's pretty much a lost art. There are similarities with e-mail, but lots of people can't even write cursive these days.

chuckv97 - Posted - 02/24/2020:  21:07:41


...if you put 100 typewriters in front of 100 monkeys,,,, sooner or later one of’em will write a best seller.

Mooooo - Posted - 02/25/2020:  00:26:28


Omg, idk, lol.

5B-Ranch - Posted - 02/25/2020:  01:02:37


quote:

Originally posted by chuckv97

...if you put 100 typewriters in front of 100 monkeys,,,, sooner or later one of’em will write a best seller.






Don’t mean to be a smart ass but the picture is of a great ape  (orangutan)  which have no tails. But the great ape ( gorillas,chimpanzees, orangutans)would probably type out a novel before any monkey. 

dflowers - Posted - 02/25/2020:  02:30:47


I feel very privileged to have learned to write in the cursive style of handwriting. Many a letter I have written and received, mostly while in the Navy and deployed overseas. The visual sensation I would get while reading and writing these letters was so heart warming. I miss it.

Helix - Posted - 02/25/2020:  02:36:12


It would be better to put 100 banjos, because monkeys would eat the ribbon and pee on the paper. A novel by a monkey would start with a picture of a banana. A monkey with a banjo sometimes appears here with a fake arrow through his head. Binobos jam.

m06 - Posted - 02/25/2020:  03:38:24


The ability to communicate is fundamental to being human.



Anything that causes miscommunication or distorted or no communication is a problem in the making.



We have to be able to understand each other and reality and meaning to be able to function appropriately in society and form and maintain healthy relationships. Whether that relationship is with a customer or a loved one. Good communication is the foundation of trust and understanding.


Edited by - m06 on 02/25/2020 03:41:40

Texasbanjo - Posted - 02/25/2020:  04:49:51


I refuse to text. If my kids ... or anyone else.... wants to communicate by phone, they can dial, wait for me to answer and talk to me or e-mail me.

As far as letter writing, with e-mail, people seldom actually write a letter any more. I know I don't. If I did try to compose and write a letter, my handwriting would be so bad as to be almost illegible. I wouldn't ask anyone to try to decipher that!

Thank you notes are almost extinct now. I still have a few friends who actually send them out when receiving a present, but I think thanking someone in person is enough and really, better.

Just my 2 cents worth.

steve davis - Posted - 02/25/2020:  06:50:44


Coherent writing and a more complete understanding of the english language used to be more focused in school,imo.



We've also stopped using slide rules,long division and cash.


Edited by - steve davis on 02/25/2020 06:54:04

BrooksMT - Posted - 02/25/2020:  09:43:43


Steve, you can send me any of your unused cash, I'll put it to good use :-)

I loved slide rules, the only topic in math class (9th grade) where I excelled. Not a fan of arithmetic, I confess I use my calculator. Slide rules were still taught when I got my pilot's license (E6B, a circular slide rule with extra scales for flyers)...but now electronic devices are allowed in the license tests.

Betty Edwards' "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" book has useful tips to improve handwriting...but only in the editions up through 1999. Later editions were dumbed-down for School Boards who wished to hide the fact they no longer taught cursive, Bah. You can find used, pre-2000 editions via Amazon.

There is a good book, for some (like me) that helps with writing clearly: Writing the Natural Way, by G.L.Rico.

My best trick is to use BHO's Preview before posting - I know what I wanted to say, but Preview often shows where I fell short, so I can correct before posting.

m06 - Posted - 02/25/2020:  10:39:26


Economics is the most common driver of mass changes in behaviour.



Emails including attachments (photos, documents etc) cost nothing; we simply type and press send. For a letter a UK first class postage stamp costs 70p and second class stamp 61p. Plus the cost of writing paper and envelope and the time and effort to get the letter in the mailbox.



Is a handwritten letter more intimate? Yes.


Edited by - m06 on 02/25/2020 10:45:01

banjo bill-e - Posted - 02/25/2020:  13:17:32


Economics shows us what we truly value, as opposed to what we say that we value or like to think that we value. Perhaps that is why it is called the dismal science?

And a million monkeys with typewriters will never, ever turn out a best seller and especially not the "complete works of Shakespeare". Never.

Owen - Posted - 02/25/2020:  14:41:23


Dunno, Bill. This site says it's a done deal ... Oct.6, 2011: rss.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/do...1.00533.x

Paul R - Posted - 02/25/2020:  17:44:20


quote:

Originally posted by Mooooo

Omg, idk, lol.






iyho

bubbalouie - Posted - 02/25/2020:  18:05:24


When I was a kid a friend had a list of movie stars addresses.  You could write a letter to your favorites telling them you were a fan & they would send back an autographed picture. 



I had one from Don Knots & Red Skelton among others. 



My younger brother sent off for a Free Joe Weider body building course when he was 6 or 7 & my parents & grandpa thought it was funny when he got regular mail for years addressed to Mr.His Name! 



 

Paul R - Posted - 02/25/2020:  20:46:36


quote:

Originally posted by bubbalouie

When I was a kid a friend had a list of movie stars addresses.  You could write a letter to your favorites telling them you were a fan & they would send back an autographed picture. 



I had one from Don Knots & Red Skelton among others. 



My younger brother sent off for a Free Joe Weider body building course when he was 6 or 7 & my parents & grandpa thought it was funny when he got regular mail for years addressed to Mr.His Name! 






A friend had a cat named Boola Virgin Mary. He sent off to some evangelist in the cat's name, abbreviated. So the cat kept getting mail addressed to "Mr. B.V. Mary". (This friend worked for the assessment department of the Ontario government at the time, and later became a lawyer.)

Owen - Posted - 02/26/2020:  09:49:13


Boola???   urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Boola ????

Paul R - Posted - 02/26/2020:  11:35:40


It was in 1971. I couch surfed at his apartment while I found a new place to "live". (I moved into Rochdale*, where I "lived" while going to teacher's college.)

* if you don't already know, look it up. It was "something completely different". "Unique" can't cover it.

m06 - Posted - 02/27/2020:  01:44:13


quote:

Originally posted by banjo bill-e



>Economics shows us what we truly value, as opposed to what we say that we value or like to think that we value. Perhaps that is why it is called the dismal science?<

 






One way that economic influence drives change is via cost. But to make economics ‘neutral’ is to fail to acknowledge it’s dominant critical effect on choice.



In a modern industrial economy changes in behaviour are not necessarily indicators of an individual person’s core values. More likely they are an indicator of that person’s financial consideration i.e. their ability to afford to continue to behave as they would wish.



As an obvious example many people would prefer to support small local stores and a sense of community and derive a wider human social sense of intimacy and belonging. In this basic scenario we can immediately discern two factors at work:



a) a person’s spending power; their household budget and scope to afford.



b) the effect of scale and competition (facilitated by technology) forcing small businesses to raise prices to survive or specific behaviours e.g. handwritten mail, to become a costly option.



These two basic factors alone (the full picture is more complex) act to drive a wedge between our individual values and our ability to behave in accord with our values. Often to the silent detriment of our health and happiness.



The lower cost option is created by businesses usurping other choices through economic leverage of scale and volume; and thereby making previous more intimate choices more expensive by comparison. The apparent simplistic financial ‘gain’ - cheaper goods and services - is a form of commercial manipulation, that process is blindly driven by the unending capitalist economic imperative to generate ever larger profit completely ignoring non-economic factors (values) that contribute to well-being and happiness.



 


Edited by - m06 on 02/27/2020 01:59:37

mander - Posted - 02/27/2020:  03:33:06


quote:

Originally posted by chuckv97

...if you put 100 typewriters in front of 100 monkeys,,,, sooner or later one of’em will write a best seller.






I keep hoping to be that monkey, but so far, it hasn't happened.

mander - Posted - 02/27/2020:  03:34:04


quote:

Originally posted by Mooooo

Omg, idk, lol.






Wydn!

mander - Posted - 02/27/2020:  03:43:32


quote:

Originally posted by 5strings3picks1banjo

What has happened to the art of communication, texting, emails, sales adverts, letter writing etc.






Nothing "happened" to it. The idea that people were at one time well educated, well spoken, well mannered back in the "old days," is a fairy tale we tell ourselves so we can sleep at night. My mom is the family historian, and letters have always been rare and those that exist are filled with grammatical errors. A family friend once said, "The internet has not improved communication, it merely allows us to mis-communicate faster than ever before!" 

m06 - Posted - 02/27/2020:  04:53:17


quote:

Originally posted by mander

quote:

Originally posted by 5strings3picks1banjo

What has happened to the art of communication, texting, emails, sales adverts, letter writing etc.






>Nothing "happened" to it.<






Are you serious?



We are globally all living through and subject to a communication revolution. Of unprecedented magnitude and consequence. And that has massive direct effect on our processes, systems and relationships at every level.



I’m genuinely bewildered how enormous and impactful something has to be for you to register it? An asteroid strike on Oregon?



Our online communication here is one tiny example of that revolution in human communication dynamics.


Edited by - m06 on 02/27/2020 05:00:10

mander - Posted - 02/27/2020:  05:18:18


quote:

Originally posted by m06

quote:

Originally posted by mander

quote:

Originally posted by 5strings3picks1banjo

What has happened to the art of communication, texting, emails, sales adverts, letter writing etc.






>Nothing "happened" to it.<






Are you serious?



We are all living through and subject to a communication revolution. Of unprecedented magnitude and consequence.



I’m genuinely bewildered how enormous and impactful something has to be for you to register it? An asteroid strike on Oregon?



Our online communication here is one tiny example of that revolution in human communication dynamics.






I am serious.



That the internet has increased the quantity of communication, it has done nothing to improve the quality of it, nor the way people ingest information. Look at the news. People repeat and repeat and repeat the same message, for months, because listeners don't "get" it the first ten times it is said. It was that way when I was a kid, it is that way now, it will be that way in the future.



I have nieces and nephews and neighbors who will text people who are sitting in the same room, rather that make eye contact and speak to them. One could argue that is a de-evolution.  



Man's cruelty to Man has not improved, merely because we have "better, bigger" words to use in our language. 



As to asteroids, I'm not sure what you hope to again by being rude to me, but it has missed the mark if you intent was to bully me into agreement.



 

banjo bill-e - Posted - 02/27/2020:  06:44:24


Mike, I disagree with ---" our ability to behave in accord with our values---" in that people still have the ability they just do not wish to pay the cost of their values. The difference in cost between purchasing hardware from the local guy or the big box store is not prohibitive. It is simply an extra cost that most consumers do not wish to pay, and the values of supporting the local community, or even the value of friendly knowledgeable advice, is not deemed worth the extra expense.
We have perhaps become corrupted by the notion of "getting the best deal", income levels (beyond abject poverty)* do not seem to matter, as I saw this dynamic play out here among the wealthiest consumers; the regulars of the local book store, where one could see visiting authors and commune with the local literary crowd, oh everyone loved their local bookstore, yet allowed amazon to destroy almost all of them in city after city, all to save 20% by affluent consumers to which these amounts are less than trivial.
*the truly poor must pinch every penny, I agree, but they are not the determinants of market success or failure of most businesses. That lies with the middle class, who are not at all "poor" despite the current fad of thinking so.

m06 - Posted - 02/27/2020:  10:12:08


quote:

Originally posted by banjo bill-e

>Mike, I disagree with ---" our ability to behave in accord with our values---" in that people still have the ability they just do not wish to pay the cost of their values. The difference in cost between purchasing hardware from the local guy or the big box store is not prohibitive<






Households on tight budgets - and many are - do not have the option to afford what is in accord with their preferences and values. That is why diet in the poorest homes typically consists of the cheapest options and now is often supplemented from food banks. People who are environmentally aware often cannot afford the green option.



And the economic erosion of the customer base of more expensive small local stores means they go out of business - simply disappear from our communities. This is a direct result of the rise of scale and volume and it’s ability to undercut a more intimate relationship and reframing those that experience as ‘competitors’. The CEOs and boardroom of Walmart’ et al now dictate our environments and the nature of our retail experience. For their financial benefit, with no care for the quality of community.



Communities need to ask what creates a healthy experience and well-being.  The  effect of large scale chain stores destroys human-scale interaction and diminishes a sense of community. That is also an example of how behaviour change has had a negative effect on communication. 



As with handwriting, as with retail.


Edited by - m06 on 02/27/2020 10:20:20

m06 - Posted - 02/27/2020:  10:28:14


quote:

Originally posted by mander

quote:

Originally posted by m06

quote:

Originally posted by mander

quote:

Originally posted by 5strings3picks1banjo

What has happened to the art of communication, texting, emails, sales adverts, letter writing etc.






>Nothing "happened" to it.<






Are you serious?



We are all living through and subject to a communication revolution. Of unprecedented magnitude and consequence.



I’m genuinely bewildered how enormous and impactful something has to be for you to register it? An asteroid strike on Oregon?



Our online communication here is one tiny example of that revolution in human communication dynamics.




 



>As to asteroids, I'm not sure what you hope to again by being rude to me, but it has missed the mark if you intent was to bully me into agreement<



 






Your misreading of intent and meaning is itself highly ironic given your position that in regard to communication ‘nothing has changed’.



My reference to an asteroid strike is neither rude or bullying. It is simply a comparison emphasising the concept of impact.



Something that you would’ve readily understood were we not communicating remotely online. Most 90% of communication is tone of voice, facial expression and body language. All absent in our revolutionary new communication world.

banjo bill-e - Posted - 02/27/2020:  11:54:27


Mike posted---"The CEOs and boardroom of Walmart’ et al now dictate our environments and the nature of our retail experience.--"



Again, I disagree with the notion that they "dictate". What they do is "offer". Dictate implies that there is no choice and that their decisions are backed by law. But that can only be done by government power, which is the usual alternative to market choice.

Please do not confuse these facts. So after years of purchasing from small local stores a new mega-seller arrives in the local market with lower prices and these consumers are now somehow *forced* to buy there? Their choices are now "dictated"? No, they are simply making new purchasing decisions which reveal what they truly value, which was my original premise. You don't like what this reveals so you attempt to explain it away as being somehow beyond their control and that their lives are ordered by board rooms. But choices remain, and choices reveal values.



AND! Choices are freedom.  Thank goodness that we still have choices, instead of some official deciding what is the best choice for all of us!


Edited by - banjo bill-e on 02/27/2020 11:56:11

DRH - Posted - 02/27/2020:  11:54:51


quote:

Originally posted by m06



Communities need to ask what creates a healthy experience and well-being.  The  effect of large scale chain stores destroys human-scale interaction and diminishes a sense of community.






I lived in small communities for most of my career.  Getting bilked $60 for a $15 pair of shoes, ignored in shops where I was not recognized, having three insurance companies refuse to sell me car insurance (perfect driving record, in case you were wondering), realtors trying to rent me a $300 house for $1200 - all of this is how I view local vendors.



Local industrial suppliers are even worse.  Half wanted to bilk me like a New Jersey tourist.  The other half simply refused my business.



Most of these local businesses are owned by local power brokers, the richest members of the community.  They don't support the community, they own it.



Let them close the doors.  Walmart sucks but at least they will sell me anything in the store without having to prove local bloodline going back four generations.



About 30% of the retail space in this town is vacant.  The only people that ran these stores out of business were the scoundrels that owned them.  The buildings remain empty because the owners want double or triple rent.  They would rather leave buildings to the rats and snakes than accept reasonable compensation.



Communities run by small groups of racist, xenophobic, bribe-taking, tax-dodging, money-laundering gentlemen of proper breeding are not healthy communities.  They are fiefdoms.

banjo bill-e - Posted - 02/27/2020:  11:59:35


Doug posted---"racist, xenophobic, bribe-taking, tax-dodging, money-laundering ---"

Doug, do you know these people? All of them? Do you know this to be true for a fact? Or is the fact that they are business owners enough for you to hate them? I ask as that does seem to be reason enough for many to hate these days.

figmo59 - Posted - 02/27/2020:  12:00:59


There is another option...

Everybody just...shutup...






Personaly I am not afraid to try...
Even iffin I dewit ..wrong.... ;0)


Btw...
Now just why is it..wrong ..is ..spelled with a ..w...?

steve davis - Posted - 02/27/2020:  12:09:43


The biggest problem with communicating is not taking the time to listen.

Owen - Posted - 02/27/2020:  12:24:21


Bill-e, there's choice and there's realistic choice.  I worked for a decade+ on remote MB reserves.... people living in less than ideal circumstances [to use a euphemism].    In discussing these matters, some people would bring up "choice."   My questioning what "realistic choice" [most] kids raised in those circumstances had seemed to put a damper on the discussion.   The maxim "between a rock and a hard place" isn't without foundation.



Doug, I too have spent considerable time in smallish communities; I don't think I've seen it to the extent you apparently have, but undoubtedly there's merit in what you say.


Edited by - Owen on 02/27/2020 12:26:51

DRH - Posted - 02/27/2020:  12:48:53


quote:

Originally posted by banjo bill-e

Doug posted---"racist, xenophobic, bribe-taking, tax-dodging, money-laundering ---"



Doug, do you know these people? All of them? Do you know this to be true for a fact? Or is the fact that they are business owners enough for you to hate them? I ask as that does seem to be reason enough for many to hate these days.






Yes, I do know them.  



I had to pay "coffee money" to do business in this town for 20 years. 



In another community, some decades ago, I payed about $80K in cash payments over two years, to one person to stay on the approved vendors list.



I contracted as a sales engineer for a business associate for 20 years because local businesses refused to talk to an Arab. 



Tax dodging?  See above about cash payments.



Money laundering?  That is why many local shops stay open that haven't been profitable for 10-20 years. 



Do I have some kind of envious hatred for business owners?  I was a business owner.   I started my business in 1991 and made a good living.  I don't have a problem with business owners that run legitimate businesses.  I've given them millions (mostly other people's money) over the years.  I have a problem with people who cause community stagnation and 30% unemployment while pretending to be good people.



I'm not at all sure why contempt for gentleman criminals is a bad thing.

Owen - Posted - 02/27/2020:  12:48:59


quote:

Originally posted by steve davis

The biggest problem with communicating is not taking the time to listen.






From a month or so back: "I usually don't have time to read all previous replies, nor care to."    wink


Edited by - Owen on 02/27/2020 12:49:44

5strings3picks1banjo - Posted - 02/27/2020:  12:50:54


quote:




Nothing "happened" to it. The idea that people were at one time well educated, well spoken, well mannered back in the "old days," is a fairy tale we tell ourselves so we can sleep at night. My mom is the family historian, and letters have always been rare and those that exist are filled with grammatical errors. A family friend once said, "The internet has not improved communication, it merely allows us to mis-communicate faster than ever before!" 


Hahaha yes so true




 

DRH - Posted - 02/27/2020:  13:32:52


quote:

Originally posted by Owen



Doug, I too have spent considerable time in smallish communities; I don't think I've seen it to the extent you apparently have, but undoubtedly there's merit in what you say.






Half-awake here.  I didn't mean to characterize all little towns with the same affliction.  They aren't all that way.  I've lived in towns where we were welcomed with open arms.  I suppose it comes down to the degree of community dysfunction, which looks to me like it always starts at the top.



This isn't a deep south thing.  It was worse in upstate NY than it is here.  Older and poorer communities seem to be the worst.  Whether dysfunction makes communities poor or poverty leads to dysfunction, I have no clue.



Now that I am retired I don't even notice the problem.  If the box stores don't sell it I buy online.  I still do design work (for banjo money).  All parts specified in my drawings come from online suppliers.  My clients save money and that is what keeps me in demand.

banjo bill-e - Posted - 02/27/2020:  14:51:30


Owen posted---"Bill-e, there's choice and there's realistic choice.--"

Yes, and I did post that ---"the truly poor must pinch every penny, I agree,"
But people do not like to take responsibility for their actions. They do like to be told that they have no choice in the matter, regardless of the matter in question, and especially if it involves their financial situation. But I find it laughable that anyone above abject poverty would think that the difference between purchasing an item for say, $16 instead of $20, means that their choices are dictated by any corporate boardroom and the consumer has no choice in the matter. They have a choice! And they should treasure that choice while it is still their's to make, as there is no end to those who are lining up to make all choices for them. For their own good, of course.

OldNavyGuy - Posted - 02/27/2020:  14:57:31


quote:

Originally posted by figmo59

There is another option...



Everybody just...shutup...






Off-topic forum post of the month.


Edited by - OldNavyGuy on 02/27/2020 14:58:14

Owen - Posted - 02/27/2020:  15:07:34


Bill-e, I was thinking more along the lines of choices to lead to what is widely considered a good, productive life, not the choices in buying a retail product.   As for "no end to those lining up to make all choices [on behalf of others],"  I guess I gotta get out more.... I don't see any real problem in that regard in my part of the world.    [...otoh, maybe it's willful blindness.  wink  ]



Edit: I guess I'm saying that so long as enough people [not to be confused with sheeple] are informed and engaged, it isn't going to be a "problem."   


Edited by - Owen on 02/27/2020 15:18:51

OldNavyGuy - Posted - 02/27/2020:  15:16:56


quote:

Originally posted by Owen

Bill-e, I was thinking more along the lines of choices to lead to what is widely considered a good, productive life, not the choices in buying a retail product.   As for "no end to those lining up to make all choices [on behalf of others],"  I guess I gotta get out more.... I don't see any real problem in that regard in my part of the world.    [...otoh, maybe it's willful blindness.  wink  ]






What does any of that have to do with the thread topic?



 

steve davis - Posted - 02/27/2020:  15:26:03


quote:

Originally posted by Owen

quote:

Originally posted by steve davis

The biggest problem with communicating is not taking the time to listen.






From a month or so back: "I usually don't have time to read all previous replies, nor care to."    wink






I don't equate listening to reading,Owen.



When I'm present in a conversation as in same day or so I make sure I read enough to stay on topic.If I haven't talked to someone in a few days I don't have the time or desire to read everything that's happened while I was gone...Too much like work and I'm happily retired.

roxygrl - Posted - 02/27/2020:  15:27:56


Do you think as this topic there is a link to increase in global warming?
Silly yo7

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