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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: best tenor banjo book


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/361038

PTOEguy - Posted - 02/09/2020:  16:04:20


I'm looking online and I see both a Mel Bay and Hal Leonard books - which one should I choose or should I be doing something else to learn. I want to play dixieland/ragtime type music if that helps

geoB - Posted - 02/09/2020:  16:10:10


Can you seen Mr. Green meat? Or rather Eddy Davis? He has stuff either up here at the banjo hangout or on YouTube. Not only will he play the song and you can hear it. , but a lot of times there's downloadable PDFs... And there's your music book.

geoB - Posted - 02/09/2020:  16:19:23


However, In addition to what I said above. I do have a copy of the Mel Vay Tenor banjo book. Why? Because I wanted to learn how to read tenor banjo music, and it is a pretty straightforward book.

I like the way and Mel progresses you through the cords along with reading scores.

I have seen Leonard application books for different types and styles of instruments and I think Mel Bay is a little bit more comprehensive then Hal Leonard... that is to say - As a source piece of material.

But that's just my opinion.

hobogal - Posted - 02/10/2020:  00:12:15


The Hal Leonard book by Fred Sokolow is new and has downloadable audio. It gets you going with strumming chords and playing a lead melody to dixieland classics. He goes through different keys but some of the tunes are not in the keys that they would normally be played in - it's just to demonstrate playing in different keys - so its not a tune book as such. Towards the end of the book, he explains the chord melody approach and demonstrates with some tunes. There is a vintage book by Harry Reser called Let's Play the Tenor Banjo which uses a similar approach but has a handy chord reference section at the end of the book which I use alot!
Another useful book is the Melbay chord melody method which might be a good follow-on book.
I would check out Eddy Davis as recommended but also the beginner videos by Jack Ray - think about skyoe lessons with Jack Ray or Steve Caddick. I had lessons with Steve Caddick as books only get you so far.

G Edward Porgie - Posted - 02/10/2020:  11:50:12


The best book will depend somewhat on what level you are at. Please advise as to whether you are a beginner, or if you have musical experience even if it's on another instrument.

Ag_econ_man - Posted - 02/10/2020:  17:36:33


The "McNeil chord system for tenor banjo : a complete course" is out of copywrite and freely available on the web. Page 16 is especially useful.

See the first link here at the Univ. of Rochester:
urresearch.rochester.edu/insti...nNumber=1

PTOEguy - Posted - 02/12/2020:  09:09:41


quote:

Originally posted by G Edward Porgie

The best book will depend somewhat on what level you are at. Please advise as to whether you are a beginner, or if you have musical experience even if it's on another instrument.






I'm a beginner on tenor banjo (instrument arriving mid-February) but I've been playing ukulele about 8 years now.  In college I was a serious singer and brass player (classically trained).  

Lorilee - Posted - 02/12/2020:  09:41:10


quote:

Originally posted by PTOEguy

I'm looking online and I see both a Mel Bay and Hal Leonard books - which one should I choose or should I be doing something else to learn. I want to play dixieland/ragtime type music if that helps






Hi Glen, I have a number of Tenor Banjo books that I don't need any more. If you PM me your address, I'll send them to you.

G Edward Porgie - Posted - 02/13/2020:  13:47:51


quote:

Originally posted by PTOEguy

quote:

Originally posted by G Edward Porgie

The best book will depend somewhat on what level you are at. Please advise as to whether you are a beginner, or if you have musical experience even if it's on another instrument.






I'm a beginner on tenor banjo (instrument arriving mid-February) but I've been playing ukulele about 8 years now.  In college I was a serious singer and brass player (classically trained).  






If you are classically trained, you may not need any real theory. Maybe an intermediate course would be best. You certainly won't wish to be bored with multiple pages stressing the relationships between I, IV, and V chords or the mnenomic plague of "Every good boy does fine" for learning the treble clef.



 

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