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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Those DNA tests are foolproof, right?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/360341

Paul R - Posted - 01/14/2020:  10:51:24


Uh, not so much. youtube.com/watch?v=Isa5c1p6aC0

Laurence Diehl - Posted - 01/14/2020:  10:53:08


I had mine profiled, then about 300 distant cousins showed up. And they all want money.

Mooooo - Posted - 01/14/2020:  11:51:09


I was always told that I was Hinterwald. You can imagine my surprise when I find out I'm 6% Red Angus and 22% Hereford. Now I wonder if there's any truth to any of it.

Paul R - Posted - 01/14/2020:  16:00:13


Our dog was 100% Angus.



 

Buddur - Posted - 01/14/2020:  17:10:27


Awesome. Just what I needed for court.

Wish me luck.

Brian T - Posted - 01/14/2020:  17:48:16


My parents are not your parents. So for each of us that's 2 sets of 2 different people in the past.

My grand parents are not your grand parents. So in the past for each of us, we probably had two pairs of progenitors.

The implication is that there was a much bigger population of people in the past to account for the few of us now.
No.

So how far back should we need to go to find common ancestry?
The popular DNA mapping technology supports the claims of the genetics people that going back 10-12 generations puts us under one roof as major genetic streams of inheritance.

Example: all of the First Nations people in all of the Americas can be traced back to 4 distinct lineages that came south from Beringia. Labelled A, B, C and D. On the east coast, there is Type E which is scandanavian. This is all dissected now into dozens of closely related variants called haplotypes.

The cohot of North American males, aged 50-70, are particularly prone to post surgical sepsis.
DNA analysis is trying to find "markers" in the genetic code to predict who might be at great risk to need rapid intervention.

I have it on good authority that there are at least 2 such markers and detection is quick.
Gotta love this genetic code stuff.

donc - Posted - 01/14/2020:  19:05:09


I got my Ancestry.Com results a year ago. It didn't account for my Swedish grandfather. It did give me a 19% as Norwegian. Six months later they sent me an update informing me that I was still 19% Norwegian but now 15% Swedish also. The 2 countries are next door neighbours. Due to the growth of their database they changed my report. They were actually able to pinpoint the province of Angermanland which was the correct birthplace of my grandfather. The rest of me is Irish, Scottish, English, and Welsh. Good luck on anything to do with the British Isles. Those people are so thoroughly mixed it would be like trying to define a New Yorker. One thing that I did find interesting is that I have 352,000 genetic connections to Southern Ontario. My Dad's family arrived there in 1831 so I guess there has been a lot of wink- wink nudge- nudge over the past 190 years. None of this has changed my life but it's been fun and fascinating anyhow.

mike gregory - Posted - 01/15/2020:  14:38:05


quote:

Originally posted by Brian T

My parents are not your parents. So for each of us that's 2 sets of 2 different people in the past.



My grand parents are not your grand parents. So in the past for each of us, we probably had two pairs of progenitors.



The implication is that there was a much bigger population of people in the past to account for the few of us now.

No.




So how far back should we need to go to find common ancestry?

The popular DNA mapping technology supports the claims of the genetics people that going back 10-12 generations puts us under one roof as major genetic streams of inheritance.



Example: all of the First Nations people in all of the Americas can be traced back to 4 distinct lineages that came south from Beringia. Labelled A, B, C and D. On the east coast, there is Type E which is scandanavian. This is all dissected now into dozens of closely related variants called haplotypes.



The cohot of North American males, aged 50-70, are particularly prone to post surgical sepsis.

DNA analysis is trying to find "markers" in the genetic code to predict who might be at great risk to need rapid intervention.



I have it on good authority that there are at least 2 such markers and detection is quick.

Gotta love this genetic code stuff.






No further than Toys 'R' Us





 

Brian T - Posted - 01/15/2020:  14:55:10


I bought some suction-cup little toy frogs from that store.
At random times after you stuck them down, they would pop loose with a BACK FLIP.
Next best thing to origami.

These days, I like the toy stores to shop for stuff for my grandsons to help fill up their house.

Owen - Posted - 01/15/2020:  15:10:55


...you sure you spelled it correctly there, Brian?  cheeky

bubbalouie - Posted - 01/15/2020:  15:26:28


Years after my paternal grandfather died I was talking to my uncle about being part Irish . He said we German because he did the test. Just like the commercials we celebrated St.Patricks day & he had all the nick nacks & snuck around to play the Irish sweepstakes! 



Laurance has hit the nail on the head! The family I know is bad enough!



Same with facebook why do I whan to get reaquainted with some dorks I knew in highschool? 





Sorry Mike. No farm animals in my lineage. 


Edited by - bubbalouie on 01/15/2020 15:29:58

Owen - Posted - 01/15/2020:  15:35:23


...geez, bubba...you knew dorks in hi school??? ...I only hung around with the "in crowd" cheeky

Brian T - Posted - 01/15/2020:  16:50:38


Oragami? Origami? I fold.

bubbalouie - Posted - 01/15/2020:  17:32:14


Image result for somebody disagrees on the internet cartoons

bubbalouie - Posted - 01/15/2020:  17:41:42


mike gregory - Posted - 01/16/2020:  22:18:35


@ Bubbalouie:

"There, their, they're, young man.
You just calm down about people getting words wrong."

mike gregory - Posted - 01/17/2020:  11:39:36


quote:

Originally posted by Brian T

I bought some suction-cup little toy frogs from that store.

At random times after you stuck them down, they would pop loose with a BACK FLIP.


Next best thing to origami.



These days, I like the toy stores to shop for stuff for my grandsons to help fill up their house.






===============================





"She shyly handed him a piece of paper, and as she watched him fold it, to caress it with his strong, manly fingers, she began to feel as if she soon might  have an origami, right then, right there. "



==================================



Ok, seriously:



I have seen little folded paper frogs, and if you press down and release, they will HOP.



Owen - Posted - 01/17/2020:  12:41:37


Thank you, Mike.



 


Edited by - Owen on 01/17/2020 12:48:56

Brian T - Posted - 01/17/2020:  13:06:43


Learn to make these. It's a big deal on long plane flights.
You always take some origami paper to make frogs for the little ratty kids to play with.
Then the happy parents ply you with food and drink.

overhere - Posted - 01/18/2020:  13:57:13


"My old mans a refrigerator repair man, what do you think about that?....he wears a refrigerator repairman’s jacket and a refrigerator repairman’s hat….and every Saturday evening he reads the Saturday evening refrigerator repairman’s news magazine …."

Tom Smothers

donc - Posted - 01/18/2020:  15:29:36


Identity boils down to what a person sees as himself. Nobody else really cares if you are a refrigerator repairman, a lawyer, or a postman. Your friends or family probably don't really care as long as you don't come to them to borrow money. When it comes to my ethnic origin nobody cares about that either. In my case it was me who was curious. I knew that one grandfather was from Sweden and another originates from a Scottish family. I also knew that there could be a few more. Now I know. Being a chronically curious person I found it satisfying to find out. The only danger to having this knowledge is when you run the risk of boring someone to death at your next social gathering.

Owen - Posted - 01/19/2020:  06:54:35


 

Originally posted by donc

<snip> ... When it comes to my ethnic origin nobody cares about that either.  <snip>






Ditto for me;  unfortunately that's not the way all Canadians see it [i.e. both "official" and unofficial].    no


Edited by - Owen on 01/19/2020 06:55:59

DC5 - Posted - 01/19/2020:  07:26:41


Family lore says there is some Penobscot Indian in my lineage, The only way I'll find out for sure is a DNA test. My cousin (not the same line) had one done and unknown relatives came out of the woodwork. I don't like most people all that much, especially ones I'm related to so I'm hesitant to do it.

Owen - Posted - 01/19/2020:  07:48:48


... how did the unknown relatives find out that your cousin had had it done?     


Edited by - Owen on 01/19/2020 07:55:37

DC5 - Posted - 01/19/2020:  10:39:09


Whatever service she used, the unknown relatives also used. Apparently they notify you, and anyone you are related to that uses the service, about each other. The more they build their database, the more people they can connect. She heard from the granddaughter of my fathers brother looking for any information my cousin might have about her father. My uncle died in his 40's, and the last I heard about his son he was in jail. Did not know that he had any children.

It's another reason I don't want to use the service. Not sure if I want to find out that my father might not be my father, or my grandfather might not be my grandfather.

Owen - Posted - 01/19/2020:  11:02:23


quote:

Originally posted by DC5

<snip> Apparently they notify you, and anyone you are related to that uses the service, about each other.  <snip>






Thanks, that's good to know, even though I have no desire to use any of them.  It wouldn't surprise me if it's spelled out [clearly?]  in the "terms and conditions"...  you know,  the ones that very few of "us" read/understand.

donc - Posted - 01/19/2020:  11:42:37


With Ancestry.com you have specific choices. I chose not to share it with other relatives and I also chose not to hear from any of them. 


quote:

Originally posted by DC5

Whatever service she used, the unknown relatives also used. Apparently they notify you, and anyone you are related to that uses the service, about each other. The more they build their database, the more people they can connect. She heard from the granddaughter of my fathers brother looking for any information my cousin might have about her father. My uncle died in his 40's, and the last I heard about his son he was in jail. Did not know that he had any children.



It's another reason I don't want to use the service. Not sure if I want to find out that my father might not be my father, or my grandfather might not be my grandfather.


m06 - Posted - 01/19/2020:  12:42:14


quote:

Originally posted by donc

 



>The rest of me is Irish, Scottish, English, and Welsh. Good luck on anything to do with the British Isles. Those people are so thoroughly mixed it would be like trying to define a New Yorker.<






What you are likely to find is that if you trace your English ancestors back to their eighteenth century parish of origin there is a strong chance that generations of your family will have resided in that same or near neighbouring parishes. Surviving older grave stones in parish churchyards attest to this with the same relatively few surnames appearing time and again in that location.



The reason is legal settlement. In the period before secular centralised government existed the church was the dominant administrative authority in people's lives. The parish was the local administrative level at which people had entitlement to poor relief and residency by birth paid for from the parish church coffers. To change parish required a settlement certificate from the intended new parish. These were difficult to obtain as the church in that parish generally did not want to increase it’s financial burden by admitting new residents into the parish unless they could prove they were self-supporting. Most ordinary folk did not have the means to be financially independent and therefore stayed in the parish of their birth where they had rights and entitlements to support and, crucially, work.



Sadly there are many shocking tales of single pregnant women being bundled out of a parish so that the child would not have to be paid for and supported by the parish poor relief. Heartless.



 


Edited by - m06 on 01/19/2020 12:50:40

donc - Posted - 01/19/2020:  14:10:46


Mike.... My family were the working poor. If you were willing to come to a desolate place like Canada in 1831 it was because you were likely dirt poor. Their last known addresses were a couple of estates near Duns , Scotland. My sister the genealogist has sent a few enquiries to that area but nothing has turned up. My G-G-G-G grandfather [ a widower] and his son came here to build a house for a rich Scotsman. The rich guy never paid them but he did give them a plot of land in the area where they eventually prospered as woodworkers and farmers. The other curve is that our name Craik appears in old records as Craike, Craick, and of course Craig the most common variant of the same name. Birth and death records were usually kept by a church clerk who would have had only the basic skills of literacy. 


Edited by - donc on 01/19/2020 14:13:21

m06 - Posted - 01/19/2020:  14:28:31


So many English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh working poor departed in search of a life away from injustice and the oppressive and and exploitative system here that was contrived to maintain the status quo for the wealthy.

The great sadness and irony is that injustice and contrivance eventually replicates. You can change geographical location but human weakness travels.

Brian T - Posted - 01/19/2020:  14:34:22


The spelling of my last name was changed by my paternal grandfather when he was in his 20's. No idea if that was ever legally registered or not. Anyway, it gave us a working clue to look for relatives in the UK.

Dad found that part of the family. Flew over to England and made the journey to find them. Originally blacksmiths. No interest in striking up so much as a friendship.

So just for the hell of it, I did the Ancestry.ca nDNA test. Very accurately, it pointed out the broad locations for the various districts of family in the UK.

The next thing is to get my mtDNA tested. This is mitochondrial DNA and it is strictly limited to maternal inheritance. Pretty fuzzy, back 4-5 generations, on Mom's side of the family.

Paul R - Posted - 01/19/2020:  20:08:53


quote:

Originally posted by m06

So many English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh working poor departed in search of a life away from injustice and the oppressive and and exploitative system here that was contrived to maintain the status quo for the wealthy.



The great sadness and irony is that injustice and contrivance eventually replicates. You can change geographical location but human weakness travels.






And there are predators wherecer you go.

Astrobanjo - Posted - 01/19/2020:  21:10:45


I find it baffling that so many people are so willingly giving their DNA to shady corporations with ties to Intelligence and the military. What could go wrong?...right?

I'll leave this video here for those that want to consider this beyond the surface level.

corbettreport.com/episode-118-...your-dna/

donc - Posted - 01/19/2020:  21:51:38


quote:

Originally posted by Astrobanjo

I find it baffling that so many people are so willingly giving their DNA to shady corporations with ties to Intelligence and the military. What could go wrong?...right?



I'll leave this video here for those that want to consider this beyond the surface level.



corbettreport.com/episode-118-...your-dna/



 






I've been asked the same thing.  If you are into conspiracy theories what about medical blood tests ?  We've all had one or two in the last few years. An underpaid lab technician is offered a good sideline. Send one drop of the available blood with the name, birth date, and address. Each name with an enclosed sample results in a dollar or two in the return mail. The blood is turned into a DNA profile which is available to  willing purchasers such as  banks, private employment agencies, health insurers or  life insurance companies......  A blood test could save your life so don't skip a blood test based upon my haunting theory. 


Edited by - donc on 01/19/2020 21:57:38

DC5 - Posted - 01/20/2020:  05:21:31


My wife often suggests that what Orwell missed in 1984 was not that Big Brother would demand these things, but that the people would demand to have them. We freely give up our privacy for rapid search capability, grocery discounts, credit card and other conveniences, and now ancestry records. Data is huge business, and gives great power to those who control it.

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