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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Jazz Soloing: How High The Moon


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/359109

banjola1 - Posted - 12/01/2019:  22:06:35


A jazz guitarist told me many years ago that if I really wanted to learn jazz, I should first learn all my major and minor scales. He also said it wouldn't hurt to learn to read standard music notation. He advised me to transcribe solos of the jazz players I really liked.



He knew I played banjo but he wasn't my instructor. He probably didn't care whether I wanted to hear his advice or not. To him, that was the way to learn. So I took his advice. There were no banjo study books on the matter in 1978, so I used guitar and flute books to form all my scales. I started to transcribe jazz solos with an old Marantz dual speed cassette recorder instead of dragging a needle.



The attached PDFs (HHTM1, HHTM2) are parts 1 and 2 of a transcribed solo of Sonny Stitt for the song "How High The Moon" in standard notation.



The third PDF is a banjo etude study written in both standard notation and tablature. It is not a solo. It is a banjo composition demonstrating one way to connect jazz chord changes melodically. An MP3 file is included.



More cowbell...


MoJoBanjo - Posted - 12/02/2019:  05:54:08


Thanks, Pat! This is great! I have both your books, including the jazz book and they have been invaluable. Highly recommend for the rest of you. I used to play a little jazz on the guitar, and was a little skidish to try on the banjo - but no more. It is a lot of fun. And yes, learn the fundementals...it saves a lot of heartache down the line. And more cow bell. Thanks for sharing!

mikebanjo - Posted - 12/02/2019:  06:54:59


I am taking a ensemble jazz class at the folk music center in Denver, Swallow Hill, and we are currently learning/playing this tune but in Eb. Good to see it written out in G. Pat Cloud is such an inspiration to all of us trying to do more than bluegrass and old timey on the banjo.

MoJoBanjo - Posted - 12/02/2019:  07:24:52


Post a video once you get a handle on the tune. Good luck!

Originally posted by mikebanjo

I am taking a ensemble jazz class at the folk music center in Denver, Swallow Hill, and we are currently learning/playing this tune but in Eb. Good to see it written out in G. Pat Cloud is such an inspiration to all of us trying to do more than bluegrass and old timey on the banjo.






 

pearcemusic - Posted - 12/02/2019:  09:04:55


Yes Thanks so much for ur generosity Pat !!!
Great stuff

mikebanjo - Posted - 12/02/2019:  09:34:54


Thanks for requesting a video of the tune we are playing in Eb. Once on a while someone videos the jazz ensemble for the performance class and if so I can send. But I know not how to video myself solo. Would not want to so anyhow for the mistakes I make. That's the nice thing about ensembles . . mistakes can be covered up by others.

mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 12/02/2019:  12:54:37


Here's the track

youtube.com/watch?v=eYiBwPw9dYM

banjola1 - Posted - 12/02/2019:  16:52:20


Thank you all for the feedback. It is encouraging. I recorded the banjo study to reassure myself that it can be played. I wrote it years ago so I had to relearn it.



I have a few suggested fingering changes:





1.) Slide on Bb7 in 7th measure (Gb to F)

2.) Slide across measures to the D7b9 chord from the 9th to 10th measure (Bb to

3.) A and a slide or hammer C to C# end of 10th measure

4.) Slur or hammer slide 23rd measure E to F

5.) Fingering on 25th measure on the 6th and 7th notes in on the (Bb and C) - tab would be better fretted 3 to 1 on the second and third strings respectively rather than 8 to 5 on the third and fourth strings.



These changes seem to help get the exercise up to speed. After getting familiar with this study, I would urge anyone to rewrite, truncate, elongate and provide yourself with variations. There are so many ways to go. The five-string banjo neck will always tell you what it likes.



My new website will feature lesson packages which would include an online meeting for each lesson.



I thought I'd start with some Django tunes, since it is more in the acoustic vein.



Again, thanks for your comments.



Pat-


Edited by - banjola1 on 12/02/2019 16:54:08


AGACNP - Posted - 12/16/2019:  10:19:33


Wow, how timely! I just purchased the Kindle version of your Jazz for 5 String book, and it seems to be exactly what I've been looking for.


Thanks for your continued sharing of info here, it is appreciated mightily!


 


quote:

Originally posted by banjola1

Thank you all for the feedback. It is encouraging. I recorded the banjo study to reassure myself that it can be played. I wrote it years ago so I had to relearn it.



I have a few suggested fingering changes:





1.) Slide on Bb7 in 7th measure (Gb to F)

2.) Slide across measures to the D7b9 chord from the 9th to 10th measure (Bb to

3.) A and a slide or hammer C to C# end of 10th measure

4.) Slur or hammer slide 23rd measure E to F

5.) Fingering on 25th measure on the 6th and 7th notes in on the (Bb and C) - tab would be better fretted 3 to 1 on the second and third strings respectively rather than 8 to 5 on the third and fourth strings.



These changes seem to help get the exercise up to speed. After getting familiar with this study, I would urge anyone to rewrite, truncate, elongate and provide yourself with variations. There are so many ways to go. The five-string banjo neck will always tell you what it likes.



My new website will feature lesson packages which would include an online meeting for each lesson.



I thought I'd start with some Django tunes, since it is more in the acoustic vein.



Again, thanks for your comments.




 




Pat-






 

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