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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Need help identifying vintage banjo pot


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/352646

banjukebox - Posted - 03/31/2019:  13:20:27


Can anyone give me a guess as to who might have made this pot? The rim is multiple ply maple with what is probably a walnut accent ring. There is intricate marquetry inlay. The tone ring is raised up off the rim with evenly-spaced round-headed brads. And what would be the purpose of the metal bar spanning the heel of the neck and dowel rod. It doesn't seem as if it would add much stability to the construct.
The neck is not original.









 

banjukebox - Posted - 03/31/2019:  13:21:35


It's 11" in diameter.

Andy FitzGibbon - Posted - 03/31/2019:  14:14:46


Looks like a Puntolillo/Majestic product. There are others here with more knowledge of those than me.

S. S. Stewart offered Kuenstler's patent neck truss, which had a turnbuckle and could be used to make minor action adjustments (though it didn't excel at that). Other manufacturers offered an imitation, which didn't have the adjustability. It could be argued, too, that some of them were put in place to compensate for poorly-done neck joints on cheap banjos.

Andy

beezaboy - Posted - 03/31/2019:  14:27:20


I would guess Oscar Schmidt based on the neck stabilizer and the overall New York look (except the neck truss). The OS neck stabilizer is unique in that the dowel is notched on the sides and the stabilizer slides down into the notches.

G Edward Porgie - Posted - 03/31/2019:  15:07:05


I agree with John that this is most likely an Oscar Schmidt, although it's a bit fancier than the Schmidts I've encountered. That is most definitely their design for the neck attachment/stabilizer.

Andy FitzGibbon - Posted - 04/01/2019:  02:52:37


The new neck might also mean a new dowel stick, which might mean that the neck attachment hardware came from another banjo.

Andy

banjukebox - Posted - 04/01/2019:  07:37:29


Thanks to all who have responded. In further research, I have found very similar Marquetry in some of the banjos made by Portolillo. The dowelstick came with the pot and was incorporated into the new neck. I've also found what looks like a faded
"Bruno" stamp on the skin head.

beezaboy - Posted - 04/01/2019:  10:11:15


Look closely at Puntolillo examples.
To best of my knowledge Puntolillo did not use a dowel stick but instead used a rod encased in a nickel plated sleeve.
Further, Puntolillo had his own patented tone ring that is usually stamped 1920 something. Just my own experience but I don't recall having seen a Puntolillo with a tone hoop.

Andy FitzGibbon - Posted - 04/01/2019:  10:46:01


quote:

Originally posted by beezaboy

Look closely at Puntolillo examples.

To best of my knowledge Puntolillo did not use a dowel stick but instead used a rod encased in a nickel plated sleeve.

Further, Puntolillo had his own patented tone ring that is usually stamped 1920 something. Just my own experience but I don't recall having seen a Puntolillo with a tone hoop.






John, I've always assumed Puntolillo made banjos for others, particularly Majestic... any information on that?  Majestics have a wood dowel stick.



As we discussed before, Yosco banjos also look like they might have been made by Puntolillo.



Andy

beezaboy - Posted - 04/01/2019:  11:20:03


Hi Andy -
You got me there. I've never seen a Puntolillo with a dowel stick that I can remember??
I've always seen the single rod hidden by the nice shiny sleeve.
I always thought the Majestic line was Puntolillo's own brand and he also made banjos for others but who I don't know except he got Buegeleisen & Jacobsen's contract to make the Stewart Wondertone line in the early thru mid twenties.
The marquetry on the OP banjo appears to be Puntolillo but where'd the slotted dowel come from and the tone hoop doesn't look like a Puntolillo practice. Very strange.
John


beezaboy - Posted - 04/01/2019:  11:28:15


Here's a little open-back Puntolillo Princess I have.


Billybiltbanjo - Posted - 04/01/2019:  12:07:57


I am guessing a modified Puntolillo based on the rim.. Most of his banjos had a hollow rim spacer, or Rudy type neck adaptation but the solid wood dowel is a little different than most of Puntolillos.. The dowel brace does look like one from Oscar Schmidt

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