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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Resonator screw replacement(s)?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/350800

fermata2 - Posted - 02/02/2019:  06:59:26


Hello all. I'm a serious bass player who dabbles in banjo occasionally. I have a mid-1990s era Washburn B-9 banjo, and I picked it up recently, only to notice that one of the screws that secures the resonator to the instrument is missing. I cannot find it anywhere.

So, the question...is this a standard part that is the same on all instruments or is this particular screw unique to the Washburn B-9? Any idea where I can find a replacement(s)?

GStump - Posted - 02/02/2019:  08:09:21


Hello fermato - a pic would be good. the part is probably not something terribly hard to find. but that depends! if not too strange, and i can't imagine it would or should be, and you can probably find one at any GOOD music store, or try stewmac.com, fqms.com, or any number of good online musical supply type stores. banjo.com is another. many banjo collectors and/or good luthiers or instrument repair folks also have some odds and ends on hand, or a bunch of "parts" in a box or two, OR they will/might know where to get it.

Old Hickory - Posted - 02/02/2019:  10:06:24


quote:

Originally posted by fermata2

So, the question...is this a standard part that is the same on all instruments or is this particular screw unique to the Washburn B-9? Any idea where I can find a replacement(s)?






It is neither standard to all instruments nor unique to yours.



Banjos built in the US, and probably RK banjos though built in China, tend to use resonator thumb screws with the same thread as used by Gibson for decades. The size and shape of the screws varies a little, but to the extent that Gibson created a standard, they tend to be interchangeable.



Banjos built in Asia, I believe, tend to uses resonator screws with different thread (metric).



In both cases, I say "tend" because there really is no standard. 



eBay might be a source for Asian-made resonator screws.

fermata2 - Posted - 02/02/2019:  10:32:51


Thanks so much for the quick replies. Here are a couple photos of another one of the screws. I suppose I could take it to Home Depot or something like that to figure out whether its metric or American, but if anyone has any better insight, I'd sure appreciate it. St. Patrick's Day is right around the corner and I have gigs on banjo that weekend, so I need to get my chops, as limited as they are, back online soon!




banjonz - Posted - 02/02/2019:  10:44:11


It will be metric. Not sure of the size whether 3mm or 4mm.

heavy5 - Posted - 02/02/2019:  10:52:50


Well it is a course thread whatever it is ?
If you're not esthetically concerned , 3 screws will do fine assuming it requires 4 .

Old Hickory - Posted - 02/02/2019:  12:25:45


quote:

Originally posted by fermata2

I suppose I could take it to Home Depot or something like that to figure out whether its metric or American, but if anyone has any better insight, I'd sure appreciate it.






Several thoughts:



1 -  If your Home Depot is anything like mine, it's the worst place to buy single screws, bolts, nuts or washers. While they do have the display board for determining size and thread count, their bins are awful.  Much better to go to a local Ace, True Value, Trustworthy or independent hardware store that will have an aisle of well organized pull-out bins. And employees who can actually help you find what you're looking for.



Once you determine the size and thread, I suggest looking for a bolt or machine screw in stainless steel.  It's almost a match for chrome or nickel.  The store's not likely to have a thumbscrew, but you could get a couple nuts, run them up to just under the head and accomplish the same thing.  Or a cylindrical nylon spacer or washer. My neighborbood Ace has cylindrical metal spacers in various sizes, but I don't know if any would fit over a screw to imitate the effect of a thumbscrew.



2 - This screw on eBay might work. But there's no real way to tell from a photo.  Suppose you could ask the seller for the size and thread -- assuming he knows.



3 - A resonator will stay on fine with just 2 screws.  On one of my parts banjos, I needed to relocate the wall lugs because the hook spacing on my flange is not Mastertone standard.  It would work with two opposite lugs in use, but not all 4.  I removed two, plugged their holes, and 4 years later haven't got around to reinstalling them.  I'll eventually finish the job, but so far two screws are doing the job just fine.  If you have two, then you're OK for St. Pat's.  (I'm playing St. Pat's, too)

Quickstep192 - Posted - 02/02/2019:  13:29:55


I use stainless steel socket head cap screws to attach my resonator.



An ACE Hardware store should have them in metric or imperial threads.



 

Helix - Posted - 02/02/2019:  18:04:42


Quickstep192 has the correct solution in my opinion. It gives you a way to quickly attach and remove the rez. I haven't seen these in stainless at ACE, only in black, no matter. It's metric. Some of these screws don't even have the flathead nor Phillips head like Gold Tone's.

Also I have had to buy a bag of metric tailpiece socket head cap screws on account. On account that they sometimes are not in the tailpiece kit. Same solution, different parts.

BrooksMT - Posted - 02/03/2019:  13:22:34


Ok, I got in a big argument on another thread, but here goes:

Japanese metric is not the same as European metric in very small sized screws. I know this from my days as a model RR steamer trying to replace lost screws (ran outdoors, screws ended up in the ballast, probably). Pitch is different (.3 and .6 vs .5). Perhaps Japanese metric has changed to European standards since I went looking for screws, I don't know.



I have no idea how Chinese metric compares to European metric. I believe US follows European metric standards, so US hardware stores would stock European metric.



Take a sample screw with you, and carefully compare thread and diameter with whatever the hardware store man suggests out of his stock. Use a loupe, if you have one, for checking threads. It might help to check several different store screws out of the box : they are machine-made, and wear in the machine and iffy quality control might yield screws of different specs.



Hope this helps


Edited by - BrooksMT on 02/03/2019 13:24:41

Old Hickory - Posted - 02/03/2019:  19:12:21


Determining the thread is usually easy. The nuts and bolts aisle will have a display board with threaded sockets in a wide range of threads. This board also has short sections of threaded rod for testing nuts. Both US and metric.



Once you know what size you need, check the bins or pictures and descriptions on the pull-out drawers to find what looks it might work.

BrooksMT - Posted - 02/04/2019:  08:44:27


Old Hickory
That's a cool hardware store you have. I've not seen such a display board at the local stores here. Next time I'm at hardware store, I'll ask them to make one.

mike gregory - Posted - 02/04/2019:  09:30:24


I agree with whomever says to take ONE screw to the ACE or Tru Value store, check it against their bolt-fit device, and get one of those.



And unless you're really FUSSY, don't worry if it's not the same color.

You can't HEAR a difference in the banjo, with different colors of resonator bolts.



If it really bothers you, buy FOUR of them, and they WILL all be the same. wink

Old Hickory - Posted - 02/04/2019:  09:35:35


quote:

Originally posted by BrooksMT

Old Hickory

That's a cool hardware store you have. I've not seen such a display board at the local stores here. Next time I'm at hardware store, I'll ask them to make one.






The store doesn't make it. It's supplied by the manufacturer of the nuts and bolts who provides the pull-out drawers and bins.  Hillman is one of the companies.



Here's a typical one. Sorry I chose a picture so out of focus. The sizes are listed below each socket or rod end. This board has both US and metric.



And this is what the aisle typically looks like.  Note the drawers at the guy's head height.  That's where I usually find the stainless items.



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