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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Early 60's RB 250 Wood


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/350574

Retro - Posted - 01/26/2019:  10:01:24


If a Mastertone RB-250 Banjo was built in 1962...How old would the Mahogany have to be that was used ,was it from the 1940's 30s ?


Edited by - Retro on 01/26/2019 10:02:54

BobbyE - Posted - 01/26/2019:  12:39:35


Given the demand for just about any kind of raw materials for use in WWII, I wouldn't think to
heavily toward the wood from a 62 banjo being from the 30s or 40s. I would say anything is possible though, especially with Gibson. I have never heard whether wood could be dated or not. Maybe someone who knows will chime in. Good question.

Bobby

rcc56 - Posted - 01/26/2019:  13:29:05


There is evidence that mahogany was in short supply at the Gibson plant by 1943 because of WWII.

Guitars that ordinarily were made with mahogany often had the following parts substituted: maple necks, solid or laminated maple backes and sides, poplar neck blocks.

It is likely that when Gibson again started making these parts from mahogany, they were using freshly harvested wood.

Ken LeVan - Posted - 01/26/2019:  14:05:53


There has been this same discussion numerous times.  If someone cuts down a mahogany tree today, the tree could be be 350 years old, so looking at the cross section of the trunk, the wood in the center will be 350 years old, halfway out it will be 175 years old, near the bark it might only be 10 years old.



As far as I know, lumber is not graded by what section of the trunk it's cut from, and does it make any difference?

The Old Timer - Posted - 01/26/2019:  17:28:52


Honduras mahogany has been cut pretty well constantly over many decades or even centuries. I guess the Cuban mahogany was pretty well gone by the 40s, but Gibson never claimed to use that.

I imagine all of it is/was "old growth" as already mentioned above. But how long it had been in Gibson's timber yard, or even cut into planks and dried, is probably "relatively shorter" since WWII than it was prior to. I agree, it is doubtful any wood in Gibson's yard from the pre-war years, survived into post war banjos (or guitars).

Again, dry is dry, so once it IS dry, I don't suppose it makes an awful lot of difference how much older it might be than that.

Retro - Posted - 01/27/2019:  07:58:42


How long does wood have to age before its used to Make an Instrument ?This might be a more accurate question.

Ken LeVan - Posted - 01/27/2019:  08:29:00


quote:

Originally posted by Retro

How long does wood have to age before its used to Make an Instrument ?This might be a more accurate question.






for air dry, it's one year per inch, then it ought to be put in the shop for another 6 months to acclimate.

Retro - Posted - 01/27/2019:  09:11:43


quote:

Originally posted by Ken LeVan

quote:

Originally posted by Retro

How long does wood have to age before its used to Make an Instrument ?This might be a more accurate question.






for air dry, it's one year per inch, then it ought to be put in the shop for another 6 months to acclimate.






  Wood is wood, but is this the same time frame Gibson would have used...... 1 year  of drying?

rcc56 - Posted - 01/27/2019:  15:32:13


quote:

Originally posted by Retro

quote:



 






for air dry, it's one year per inch, then it ought to be put in the shop for another 6 months to acclimate.






  Wood is wood, but is this the same time frame Gibson would have used...... 1 year  of drying?






Maybe sometimes.  Anything could have happened [and did] in the seventies and early eighties.



1962 was during a period of relative stability; but they were already starting to mess up their flat-top guitar designs by then.



Has there ever been general agreement about when the first multi-ply rims started to appear?


Edited by - rcc56 on 01/27/2019 15:38:33

desert rose - Posted - 01/27/2019:  19:22:15


Gibson was and is a MANUFACTURER not a craft shop with old bearded dudes whittling instruments.

Prewar banjos were made from wood harvested and dried commercially likely used within a year or so of felling. Same goes today. One of Saga Musical Insteruments claims to fame during the eightys with Gold Star banjos and Kentucky mandolins was Richard bought wood from the same supplier to Gibson during the prewar days. Cut and kiln dried just like then

The war effort used all available stock of materials for ALL companies making anything

Scott

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