Banjo Hangout Logo
Banjo Hangout Logo

Premier Sponsors

604
Banjo Lovers Online


Discussion Forum

Want to hide these Google ads? Join the Players Union!

 All Forums
 Other Banjo-Related Topics
 Banjo Building, Setup, and Repair
 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Workshop Humidifier


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/350567

Parker135 - Posted - 01/26/2019:  06:55:16


Any recommendations for a workshop humidifier? My shop is in a small remote structure that once was a horse and buggy stable on the alleyway. We have a whole-house humidifier that keeps things reasonable for my instruments, but the workshop is running around 22-25% humidity this time of year. I'd like to get it to something closer to the house humidity so if I leave something like a mandolin in there it won't be damaged. I also want to be able to glue things up without huge swings in moisture content.

Looking at small humidifiers online, it seems like there is a lot of cheap stuff available with a life expectancy measured in weeks. Any suggestions?

wizofos - Posted - 01/26/2019:  10:47:38


I would consider a console unit. Most of them are adjustable. A console models have larger water reservoirs and don't need to be filled as often. The other thing is that the filters are larger and don't need to be changed or cleaned as often. We go through about 5 gallons a day in a 2000 sq ft house.

Parker135 - Posted - 01/26/2019:  11:09:00


I'll look into that. My searches have just turned up the typical room sized ones that seem to be great for a few weeks and then often crap out. I have less than 200 sq ft to humidify, but the larger size would be nice since I don't have to fill it as often. Now that I know what to look for, I'm turning up some better options. Thanks.

pickin_fool - Posted - 01/26/2019:  11:11:53


how is it heated?..my garage..converted to a motorcycle repair shop went thu 3 heaters or so before i settled on an oil heater..i had a forced air gas heater hanging from the ceiling for a year...that made it so dry in there that if you wore loose sweat pants for example..the static in the air from lack of humidity caused them to cling to my legs...



i tried wood..which seemed better but i didnt like the idea of having to go out to the garage in 40 below weather, fire it up, wait a half hour till things warmed up..yadda yadda...



what i settled on was a forced air unit but oil fed..i picked it up from someone that was scrapping a mobile home..this particular unit had a water line on it that was fed from the household main..i converted a 5 gallon pail, with appropriate fittings etc..prob solved as far as humidity



i have no idea about the % of humidity because to me it didnt matter..my personal comfort did..it wouldnt be hard to adjust tho if an exact percentage was required..another thing i incorporated into my system was a remote switch in my back porch..so no going outside to light a fire..



you dont say how your shop is heated but with a little creativity you could incorporate the humidifier from a regular home furnace..the one in my house consisted of a rectangular container..maybe 6"x12" x6" that had a series of absorbant plates in it and again fed water from the house main...rate was controlled via a drip type valve..it was basically based on evaporation

Parker135 - Posted - 01/26/2019:  11:37:38


I forget the name of the heating/cooling unit, but it's essentially like the wall mounted units in hotel rooms. It has a small heat pump for most heating and then reverts to normal resistance heating when it gets really cold. It works great. Our whole-house humidifier works like the one you describe, but that would be tough to incorporate into this setup.

banjobart - Posted - 01/26/2019:  16:07:33


I use the free hillbilly humidifier. I shovel into the shop a couple shovels full of snow and toss it under machines and shelves (out of the way). Within minutes I can feel the pleasing humid air in the sinuses as the snow melts and evaporates. The wood is happier, too. 25% is not bad during a cold snap of dry Arctic air, like the last two weeks in our area. 30% would be better and certainly enough.

Dan Drabek - Posted - 01/26/2019:  16:55:12


In my town (Santa Cruz) it rarely gets drier than 50% RH. If I ever need to alter the air in my house it is usually with a de-humidifier.

Humidifiers around here can be had for a few dollars at the local Goodwill or Salvation Army stores. I can usually see two or three of them on any given day. But that may be because there is little demand for them in a seaside town. De-humidifiers on the other hand, are a little harder to find but not impossible. Thrift shops are again a good source.

I like Bart's snow trick. But snow is never seen in this area.

DD

Parker135 - Posted - 01/26/2019:  17:36:00


quote:

Originally posted by banjobart

I use the free hillbilly humidifier. I shovel into the shop a couple shovels full of snow and toss it under machines and shelves (out of the way). Within minutes I can feel the pleasing humid air in the sinuses as the snow melts and evaporates. The wood is happier, too. 25% is not bad during a cold snap of dry Arctic air, like the last two weeks in our area. 30% would be better and certainly enough.






Great idea!  Actually, just tonight I took a pizza pan out there with a water soaked towel in it to evaporate overnight.  So 30% is reasonable?  I guess if I'm going to be gluing, it's better to do in when dry instead of doing it in high humidity and then taking it to a drier environment.  I think I remember you posting once about working in batches according to what season works best for the various operations and components.

Parker135 - Posted - 01/26/2019:  17:38:36


quote:

Originally posted by Dan Drabek

Humidifiers around here can be had for a few dollars at the local Goodwill or Salvation Army stores. I can usually see two or three of them on any given day. But that may be because there is little demand for them in a seaside town. De-humidifiers on the other hand, are a little harder to find but not impossible. Thrift shops are again a good source.



DD






I hadn't thought about a thrift shop, but I bet they're sold out at present, at least in this area.  I definitively need a dehumidifier in the summer.  Thankfully, they're a little more robust than what I'm finding in smallish humidifiers.

Dan Drabek - Posted - 01/26/2019:  18:41:37


I picked up a dehumidifier specifically to dry the air when I was varnishing a project. I know that varnish dries by polymerization rather than evaporation, but low humidity is still helpful for getting the varnish to kick off.
DD

banjobart - Posted - 01/26/2019:  19:57:50


I only glue fingerboards on to necks from November 1 to April 1 when the heat is on and the humidity is low - 40% and less. This avoids back bows later on.

banjobart - Posted - 01/26/2019:  20:09:39


To dehumidify in the summer I just keep the air conditioner running. It draws the excess moisture out if the air and deposits it outdoors along with the heat. It keeps the relative humidity to 40-50% at room temperature from May-September.



Note that the OP and I live in the Great Lakes region which is a desert in winter and a rain forest in the summer.



Also note that humidity is relative to temperature. I just checked and the humidity is now 90% here with an outdoor temperature of 9 degrees Fahrenheit. Bring that air up to a room temperature of 60-70 degrees and the humidity falls to 15-25%, which is damn dry.


Edited by - banjobart on 01/26/2019 20:10:48

rudy - Posted - 02/02/2019:  18:03:36


quote:

Originally posted by Parker135

Any recommendations for a workshop humidifier? My shop is in a small remote structure that once was a horse and buggy stable on the alleyway. We have a whole-house humidifier that keeps things reasonable for my instruments, but the workshop is running around 22-25% humidity this time of year. I'd like to get it to something closer to the house humidity so if I leave something like a mandolin in there it won't be damaged. I also want to be able to glue things up without huge swings in moisture content.



Looking at small humidifiers online, it seems like there is a lot of cheap stuff available with a life expectancy measured in weeks. Any suggestions?






Hi Parker,



Check out the O'Brien Guitars shop humidifier:



O'Brien Guitars shop humidifier

Parker135 - Posted - 02/03/2019:  04:11:25


That is awesome! I've learned so much from O'brien's videos. I'm getting by right now with a typical bedroom-sized humidifier, but I could see making something like the O'brien one on a smaller scale. My shop is way smaller, but something that would hold a few gallons would be really convenient. I don't think I'd trust his garden hose setup enough to leave the shop for a few weeks as he mentioned though. That could be a disaster!

I don't remember now if he put any kind of filter over the fan intake. I'm careful to turn mine off when sanding to avoid getting dust pulled into the blower. His would be pulling dust in to float around on the water. Easy enough to clean, though.

Thanks for posting, Rudy.

rudy - Posted - 02/03/2019:  05:53:11


quote:

Originally posted by Parker135

That is awesome! I've learned so much from O'brien's videos. I'm getting by right now with a typical bedroom-sized humidifier, but I could see making something like the O'brien one on a smaller scale. My shop is way smaller, but something that would hold a few gallons would be really convenient. I don't think I'd trust his garden hose setup enough to leave the shop for a few weeks as he mentioned though. That could be a disaster!



I don't remember now if he put any kind of filter over the fan intake. I'm careful to turn mine off when sanding to avoid getting dust pulled into the blower. His would be pulling dust in to float around on the water. Easy enough to clean, though.



Thanks for posting, Rudy.






The basic idea is good, but I think it could be improved upon with a little thought.



If I needed shop humidification I'd most likely just use one of the cabinet style humidifiers.  They work well and have a minimum of parts to be effected by shop dust, mostly the small belt motor and fan motor.  You end up having to change the evaporator "belt" a couple of times a year, but they are easy to clean and maintain otherwise. 



Dust control is always a battle in the small shop.  If I'm going to be doing anything that creates dust I wear a good 3/4-face particle mask (I recommend the Eclipse P100).



I also have a 20" by 20" box fan mounted to the ceiling with a simple wood frame attached to use a course and a fine dust furnace filter that does a very good job of removing most of the airborne dust, again highly recommended for the small shop.



Dual filter dust removal on the cheap:



Parker135 - Posted - 02/03/2019:  08:30:02


I like that mask. I've been using a 3M version that has two large replaceable disk filters. I might give the P100 a try as my 3M one ages out.

For the whole shop area, I sprung early-on for a ceiling mounted Wen unit. It would have been more sensible to build something like yours but I got impatient and wanted to start projects like your Banjo 101! Of course now I'm tied to their filters. The outer one can be cleaned periodically at least.

Parker135 - Posted - 02/03/2019:  15:32:05


So being Ohio, and with the weather becoming progressively more weird each year, the temperature today was 60 degrees. I opened the window and now the humidity in my workshop is 43%.

banjobart - Posted - 02/03/2019:  19:50:35


The weather in our area has always been weird. It is the proximity to the Great Lakes. I wish that I lived in Albuquerque.

banjobart - Posted - 02/03/2019:  19:58:07


I like the cheap dust filter!

Parker135 - Posted - 02/04/2019:  07:26:52


quote:

Originally posted by banjobart

The weather in our area has always been weird. It is the proximity to the Great Lakes. I wish that I lived in Albuquerque.






Good place for your Harley as well!

Hangout Network Help

View All Topics  |  View Categories

0.109375