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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Chicago or Baritone uke tuning


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/343689

Chilly65 - Posted - 06/17/2018:  03:08:19


Hi I've been attempting to play the four string banjo tuned as advised by an early skilled tutor to Chicago or Baritone uke . and finding many difficulties to find tutors,others playing and lessons on basics . Any advice and or guidance would be appreciated .

stelldeergibber - Posted - 06/17/2018:  05:27:54


Since it's D-G-B-E from bottom pitch to top, you've got the top four strings of a guitar as far as chords go, so if you already know guitar chords, you already know how to play the chords on this, you just wont be fingering the two low strings of a guitar since they don't exist here. That's what makes it easy. The difficulty is going to depend partly on what kind of music you'll be trying to play. I looked on line to confirm that Chicago and Baritone were the same, and they are, there are some videos by a couple folks on there, but they're mostly blabbering about strings rather than playing anything. Since all these instruments have a quick decay on the notes, they suggest a fairly busy strumming hand.

Bert Huckelberry - Posted - 06/17/2018:  16:21:27


Try 'chordie' chordie.com/index.php

tons and tons of songs - on the right side of each song you get the chords, the key, and the ability to change tuning - baritone uke being one of them.

Also - there are a number of ukulele websites that have scales and fret-boards for baritone uke, I have a tenor banjo tuned to Chicago tuning and use the baritone uke sites all the time.

hope this helps,

Bert Huckelberry Lexington Kentucky

Chilly65 - Posted - 06/18/2018:  13:32:05


quote:Originally posted by stelldeergibberSince it's D-G-B-E from bottom pitch to top, you've got the top four strings of a guitar as far as chords go, so if you already know guitar chords, you already know how to play the chords on this, you just wont be fingering the two low strings of a guitar since they don't exist here. That's what makes it easy. The difficulty is going to depend partly on what kind of music you'll be trying to play. I looked on line to confirm that Chicago and Baritone were the same, and they are, there are some videos by a couple folks on there, but they're mostly blabbering about strings rather than playing anything. Since all these instruments have a quick decay on the notes, they suggest a fairly busy strumming hand.Many thanks for this advice ,however I'm new to the whole music scene and so don't know any other than the little picked up so far .Every thing helps though .I will look on line at baritone sites .And am realizing I need to listen to far more music .I do enjoy blues ,jazz ,rock and roll .so Im positive I can find something to play and look forward to learning.Once more Thank You.

stelldeergibber - Posted - 06/18/2018:  19:22:57


You're more than welcome, Stuart. As soon as you learn three chords there'll be lots of basic tunes you can do, and we all need to keep listening to what others come up with as well as our own practicing to stay inspired. If you have a friend that plays a complementary instrument (meaning roughly same volume levels) you can probably learn even faster.

John Gribble - Posted - 06/18/2018:  21:35:45


I'm curious why your mentor suggested that tuning instead of tenor tuning. True, there is a lot of uke material out there (To say nothing of all the guitar material which can be adapted), But it ain't the same...

Chilly65 - Posted - 06/18/2018:  22:41:28


quote:Originally posted by John GribbleI'm curious why your mentor suggested that tuning instead of tenor tuning. True, there is a lot of uke material out there (To say nothing of all the guitar material which can be adapted), But it ain't the same... I think he suggested such tuning to try and keep me interested in the banjo ,as I had previously attempted to play 5 string and blue grass (with all greatest respect not my music. ) I enjoyed lessons with him however due to illness and financial restraints could no longer afford them. I am finding some wonderful new inspiration here so fingers crossed will keep strumming,picking and anything els -sing to enjoy .Many thanks for your post .

cb56 - Posted - 07/01/2018:  17:25:52


Here are a few pdf files that I have posted to the forum for Chicago tuning.
banjohangout.org/tab/browse.as...r&v=68717
Some folks here disagree with my method of communicating my ideas, but it works for me. If it's helpful to you, great!
I would suggest books like Baritone uke from scratch by Bruce Emory. Neck anywhere by washtub Jerry. Baritone ukulele aerobics by Chad Johnson. Songbooks that translate well to chicago tuned banjo I've enjoyed are, Fiddle tunes for baritone ukulele and Chord solos for baritone ukulele. Both by Dick Sheridan.

One thing to keep in mind when attempting to play charts written for baritone uke is the frets on a tenor and even more so on plectrum banjo are spaced quite a bit farther apart so you might have to re arrange parts of songs that might be too much of a hand stretch on larger instruments.

That's where knowing the CAGED method of playing moveable chords will come in handy. One of the pdf files that I created and linked to above has Maj. min. dom7 chords shown in 4 different inversions with the chord tone that will be your melody note on the first string. This comes in handy for arranging chord solos.

cb56 - Posted - 07/01/2018:  17:58:01


btw, I started a Chicago tuning group here awhile back but it doesn't seem to get much traffic.
banjohangout.org/group/chicagotuningdgbe

haildixon - Posted - 07/03/2018:  20:48:48


Most of the banjo technique is your strumming hand, and it doesn't matter what tuning you're in, that's gonna be pretty much the same. Find some good tutorials on that in a style you like and have at it... The rest is just fretting and there's gobs of material for guitar and baritone uke. I use a great chord app that's made for uke called UkeBank, and it gives you the baritone tunings and all chords all inversions.

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