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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Who plays in a peforming band?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/339641

NINJO - Posted - 02/07/2018:  14:56:37


Hi, who here actually plays in a gigging band? I would like to connect. I play with The Pitchfork Revolution. I'm not the world's greatest banjo player, but I know what it takes to make real music with a band and entertain fans. I see so many comments from people who don't have a sound file on their homepage that I'm not sure where they are coming from. It would be nice to actually work as a group to improve.

reverbnation.com/thepitchforkrevolution

banjohood - Posted - 02/07/2018:  17:57:39


Here's my primary band right now: thecrookednorth.com/



You band sounds good! Sounds like you all prioritize arrangements and playing tight as a group. I totally agree with that approach. What were you looking to exchange ideas on?

beegee - Posted - 02/07/2018:  18:32:53


I was, until my heart attack. Been idle since last Fall. Trying to get back, but my playing has suffered immensely since I haven't picked my banjo more than 3-4 times since August.

NINJO - Posted - 02/07/2018:  18:53:36


Ben y'all sound great too! I don't know what happened to my last post, but it may show up. Mostly, itd be nice if we had a group to help promote and support each other's bands outside the region where we generally play. Also, it'd be nice to have some active pickers to discuss band personality dynamics and tips for touring. We reached a lot of people at some large festivals here in the Pacific nw last year, but have kind of fallen off the motivation as a group to pursue more this year. We don't have professional representation, for instance, and I'm learning that we're better at playing music than at the social media and booking end of things....

NINJO - Posted - 02/07/2018:  18:55:41


Beegee, I'm sorry to hear of your heart attack. I've always enjoyed your presence here on the bho. I can't wait to hear what you're up to when you are back to recording.

plars - Posted - 02/07/2018:  20:31:41


I play in a band, Mile High Express, based out of Boulder, CO. We play 4-5 times a month in the plus festivals in the summer and like 2-3 times p month in the winter. We have some pretty good contacts with promoters in CO and I am happy to share some contact info for the people out here if you are trying to book dates in this area. Our gigs range from 3 hour bar/brewery gigs to 45 min opening sets at some pretty big venues. I have a few songs/videos listed on my home page.



I like the idea of starting this thread so thank you. I am interested to see the type of people who reply and what music their bands play. We are, by no means, a straight bluegrass band. I get my fill of that by filling in with some other musicians I know who play the bar and brewer scene around Denver. That stuff requires less practice and less arrangement than the band I play/practice with but overall I get out at least once a week for some type of gig year round. Denver has a pretty great bluegrass scene!



Paul


Edited by - plars on 02/07/2018 20:34:20

banjohood - Posted - 02/07/2018:  21:00:13


quote:

Originally posted by NINJO

Ben y'all sound great too! I don't know what happened to my last post, but it may show up. Mostly, itd be nice if we had a group to help promote and support each other's bands outside the region where we generally play. Also, it'd be nice to have some active pickers to discuss band personality dynamics and tips for touring. We reached a lot of people at some large festivals here in the Pacific nw last year, but have kind of fallen off the motivation as a group to pursue more this year. We don't have professional representation, for instance, and I'm learning that we're better at playing music than at the social media and booking end of things....






Thanks! I can tell you from experience, if you get better at social media, branding, and booking, you can make more money and reach a wider audience. It makes a huge difference. If you have aspirations to do minor tours and use it as a second income, professional representation isn't a bad idea. We're lucky in that we have a woman in our band who is a total pro at that stuff. There's not a lot of money in this music, but there's still some to go around, especially if you can connect with audiences who don't normally listen to bluegrass. I've found the jam band and the country audiences very sympathetic if you can get in front of them.

writedivine - Posted - 02/09/2018:  08:20:14


I play in a band - The Clear Creek Girls:

facebook.com/Clear-Creek-Girls...bookmarks

youtube.com/watch?v=Yu-MSVgDCoE

steve davis - Posted - 02/11/2018:  06:26:50


I float around in 2 or 3 bands.
Still in my original band from 1977.

HarleyQ - Posted - 02/11/2018:  20:11:24


quote:

Originally posted by banjohood

Here's my primary band right now: thecrookednorth.com/



You band sounds good! Sounds like you all prioritize arrangements and playing tight as a group. I totally agree with that approach. What were you looking to exchange ideas on?






WOW!! You guys are PRO'S. You Rock

yeoldbanjoguy - Posted - 10/04/2018:  15:31:10


I’ve never had the opportunity to perform onstage professionally. Every once in awhile, I’ll hear a band that just blows me away. Ben, from crooked north, you guys are just phenomenal. I wish you all the luck in the world. Great talent!

mbuk06 - Posted - 10/06/2018:  04:42:20


quote:

Originally posted by NINJO

 >but I know what it takes to make real music with a band and entertain fans<






?



I'm not going to ask you to define what you mean as 'real' music as that would be knowingly, and unkindly leading you on toward a bear trap of your own making and I have no wish to do that. However, I will suggest you go listen to easily available field recordings of any number of banjo players who were never in a band and who played real music with absolutely none of the artifice related to performing for an audience.



If you want to know what I mean by the word 'artifice' consider your unwittingly revealing use of the word 'fans'; that is a constructed agenda independent of the music - that is artifice. And real and artifice are two polar opposite and irreconcilable ends of a creative spectrum.



The statement you wrote indicates that you are yet to understand the contradiction in terms that it represents. I politely suggest it would be more useful for you to appreciate that distinction, humility and discern musical ability rather than whether other BHO members choose to express those attributes in a band or not. smiley


Edited by - mbuk06 on 10/06/2018 04:46:45

Veerstryngh Thynner - Posted - 10/07/2018:  03:33:55


I'd still like to offer my view on "real music", Mike. To be noted first of all that perception of what 'real' constitutes is, per definition, subjective. A mixture of taste, opinion, and experience, as I see it. And, maybe, level of education is sitting somewhere in there as well.



Secondly, "real music" means lots of different things to lots of different people. Therefore, "real music" might also be read as "viewed as the apex of musical expression". Which makes understanding of what "real music"  actually  means, in daily practice, per definition highly individual.



For one person, everything between Josquin Deprez and Igor Stravinsky may be the summum of musical expression. That's taste. Simultaneously, that same individual may not think much of jazz, pop, or German oompah - and may even be a bit sniffy as to "worth"/"value" of those genres. That's opinion. Yet someone else might not have any patience with opera, shoving that aside as "caterwauling", but is greatly enamoured with the soppiest of folkiest of folksong.



In  other words: the guy or gal regarding jazz, pop, or German oompah as slightly beneath their dignity considers Deprez or Stravinsky as the very heighth of musical genius. But the guy or gal who has no time at all for opera holds a very much similar view with respect to soppiest of folkiest folksong. I'm deliberately exaggerating here, of course, but the point I'd like to make is a serious one.



The person swearing by Deprez or Stravinsky may be culturally conditioned to ignore jazz, pop, or German oompah. Either not much exposed to these genres, or primed towards classical music by upbringing and/or education. But the very same applies to the guy or gal swearing by folkiest of folksong, to my mind. And that's experience. In the firmament of the former classical music the sole "real" music. But in the firmament of the latter it's folkiest of folksong, incontestably.



For this reason, "real", music, in the sense of one specific genre viewed as undisputably vastly superior over every other, does not exist, to my mind. And to expand on this a bit further: some degree of "ranking" in music does indeed exist, of course, in terms of cultural appreciation. Classical ranked as "high," probably; soppy folksong as "low". There is no intrinsic difference, though, between value systems of one individual considering Deprez or Stravinsky the summum of high art and the one holding the same view as to soppiest of folksong. Each may question the other's concept of "real music", naturally, But that still doesn't make what's undoubtedly real and true within their own minds real and true universally.



Veerstryngh Thynner


Edited by - Veerstryngh Thynner on 10/07/2018 03:49:33

steve davis - Posted - 10/09/2018:  10:17:13


All music is real.

Rawhide Creek - Posted - 10/10/2018:  07:20:15


In the words of the late Karl Haas said:



”There is only good music and bad music.”


Edited by - Rawhide Creek on 10/10/2018 07:20:32

yeoldbanjoguy - Posted - 10/10/2018:  10:09:43


I never had the opportunity to hear Dr Haas’ radio program. He sure had a lot of faithful followers though. Thanks for the info Rawhide.


Bruce

CW Spook - Posted - 10/14/2018:  10:09:05


An interesting thread. I play in a church 'bluegrass' band, though little of what we do would meet the test for real Bluegrass. We just finished a gig this morning at a nearby church (not our own), where we were joined by 3 other local musicians, so we ended up with three banjos, three guitars, bass and dobro/mandolin and one of the guitarists doubled up on harmonica. We're anything but professional and there's no way I'd be posting a YouTube video of our performances. On the other hand, I've also played bass horn in a brass quintet where I was the only non card-carrying union musician, doing everything from Renaisannce era music to Fats Waller.

As someone else said, all music is 'real' music. We had tons of compliments this morning from congregation members. I'm there mostly as the bass singer, but I chime in with a little clawhammer and free-style accompaniment on my 1930 Vega.Little Wonder.

I love Deprez, not particularly a fan of Strarvinsky, and I envy people like John Bullard who can do a proper rendition of Bach on the banjo, but it's all 'real music'.

Veerstryngh Thynner - Posted - 10/19/2018:  07:46:50


Yes. Exactly, Rick & Steve. Musical taste by no means static but constantly evolving, as I see it.



Well, in some cases not, probably. I know of one or two people personally who are swearing by this or that genre, categorically refusing to listen to anything else for the rest of their lives. But a musical taste arch like my own seems to be more common, to my mind.



As a toddler, I was totally blown away by Country & Western. That changed to pop, when somewhat older. Which, in turn, permutated to a lively interest in Trad, once banjo came to the scene, when in my very early teens. Secondary school, however, added a launch pad for classical music exploration in my 30s. In my twenties, a fascination for the power of the human voice, as a musical instrument, emerged, lasting to this day. There even was a time that I avoided jazz, in all its forms, like bubonic plague. Listening to classical and choral only. And now, in late middle age, almost all of these strands seem to blend and fuse into a shape I'm really thrilled about, but can't actively explore until sometime 2019.



Rick's history seems to follow a similar course. But I'd also like to tell him that my examples of Deprez and Stravinsky were more or less random. Meant as "poles" of both extremes of music history, by way of illustration of the point I was trying to make. Read for 'Deprez' Middle Ages and Renaissance. And for 'Stravinsky' modern classical from Schönberg onwards. Which won't take away, though, that I still highly appreciate Deprez, and, like Rick, Stravinsky not so much. 



To Russ (Rawhide Creek):



You quoted Dr Haas: "There's only good music and bad music". But 'good' and "bad" are also valuations. As hierarchical as the claim that classical music is superior to jazz. Which begs the question of who or what is to be the arbiter of what exactly 'good' or 'bad' in music constitutes.



I'd rather side with Steve here: all music is real music.



Veerstryngh Thynner


Edited by - Veerstryngh Thynner on 10/19/2018 08:09:18

Veerstryngh Thynner - Posted - 11/16/2018:  04:16:07


Hello all,



Twenty-seven days after this thread fell silent, I'd like to re-energise it by inviting your comments on whether or not 'good' and 'bad' are also valuations, as to music - and hierarchical valuations at that.



I raised that question in the previous post, but it never got any response.



Veerstryngh Thynner


Edited by - Veerstryngh Thynner on 11/16/2018 04:16:37

Paul2017 - Posted - 12/08/2018:  13:30:01


Here’s a gigging band but not the usual type.

m.youtube.com/watch?v=YiYOfuxQsnk

johnedallas - Posted - 12/10/2018:  13:55:52


quote:

Originally posted by Veerstryngh Thynner

Hello all,



Twenty-seven days after this thread fell silent, I'd like to re-energise it by inviting your comments on whether or not 'good' and 'bad' are also valuations, as to music - and hierarchical valuations at that.

 




OK, here goes!



Obviously, there's a difference between "taste" and "value judgement." I would say that my taste in music has widened considerably in the last 7 decades, but my value judgements have remained much the same. With regard to the music I listen to, that is! When I was a student in my 20s, I was a Wagnerian through and through, and couldn't grasp why my Professor, who was approaching retirement, was so enthusiastic about that superficial, lah-di-da Mozart. Now that I'm past retirement age myself, I understand him, and enjoy Mozart.



But as to the music I make: that's always been folk of some kind. Irish folk, Scottish folk, Christian folk, German folk, even English folk and seamen's folk, not to mention Americana. And I would say that the way I played and sang 50 years ago was not as "good" as the way I sing and play now. Simply because I've been learning for so much longer, and have got "better" at it. However, I would say that my folk music of 50 years ago was just as much "real music" as what I do today. The audiences applauded as heartily (or not) then as they do now.



Speaking of audiences: for me, the transition between "messing about with instruments that were lying around the house anyway" and "making real music" was when, as a teenager in the 1960s, I teamed up with another boy and a girl of my age from the church choir, we formed a folk group, and began rehearsing like pros (with a reel-to-reel tape recorder, even!) We only performed together once - at a church choir outing - but we had tasted the "blood" of "real music!" I haven't looked back since.



If I had to use the words "superior" and "inferior" of music, BTW, I would say that live music is superior to canned music. This applies to all genres. Even music that is not normally "to my taste" becomes acceptable when I hear and see it performed, rather than just hearing it on the radio. The ambience, be it concert hall, church, jazz club, bluegrass festival, open stage, street festival or whatever, puts the music in context, makes it more relevant. And the communication between musicians and audience is, for me as a folk musician and a classical concert-goer, central to the musical process.



Cheers,

John

mrbook - Posted - 12/10/2018:  18:43:32


Just found this topic today. My current performing band can be viewed here on Facebook: facebook.com/The-Doghouse-Carp...34191089/ . We haven't found a need for a web site yet. There are a few recent videos. I play banjo, guitar, or mandolin as needed. We usually play a couple public or private events each month, from coffeehouses and cafes to local festivals, and hope to do more next year.

I've had another band which just reached its 25 year anniversary this year, but it seems to be winding down, doing only one show this year. We have played hundreds of gigs, big and small, but this year most of the guys only want to practice and play if I get a big job that pays well. After major heart surgery last year (following a couple undetected heart attacks) I no longer have the energy to take care of all the band business, so it might be time to find some new members to share the work. I got back to performing only a few months after the surgery, but I still have to take it easy.

I also sit in with other bands whenever I am asked, and I'll get together just about anytime to play casual gigs at a farmers market or whatever, often with people with whom I've never played before. I like something fresh and different, and sometimes I like staying in the background and trying to make someone else sound good. I like playing for an audience; first to entertain, but also to see if strangers will like the music we make. Some gigs are better than others, but I can't say I have ever had a bad time playing with good people.

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