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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: reso guitars and banjos


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/338342

dupreejan - Posted - 01/01/2018:  19:48:58


I''m thinking of buying a Bottle neck Resonator Guitar. Has anybody started playing one after learning 5 string banjo, since they play just like a 5 string banjo when tuned to open D, E, or G, with the added benefit of the 2 bass strings, I figure they can't be to hard to cross over to while using a slide on 1 finger. I just got to play Allman Bros. Little Martha, and Led Zeppelin's Travelin Riverside Blues.

RioStat - Posted - 01/01/2018:  20:25:28


I bought a square-neck dobro, thinking the same thoughts as you about "it should be easy to switch over".........I've never been able to figure out one single thing on that damn instrument!



I've played guitar for as long I can remember, banjo for decades, I can saw a couple fiddle tunes, chop chords and take a few breaks on the mandolin,  even thump some upright bass, but I've met my match with that dobro !



Not to say that your reso guitar endeavours will be the same as mine............ go for it!

mmuussiiccaall - Posted - 01/01/2018:  20:53:22


I'm always looking for resos for friends of mine.
I have five resonators, round and square, from the 30's on up but I can only find a good one about once a year. I try them out whenever I see them, most sound awful let alone bowed necks and high action which mostly can be fixed. I don't care about the brand as long as it has "That Sound".
BTW learn to Travis pick before you buy because if you can't play that pattern you might as well save your money. A square neck is played completley differently.

Renfrew - Posted - 01/02/2018:  03:48:31


I've just ordered a Gold Tone Paul Beard square neck from Elderly Instruments which should arrive in about 2 months, dupreejan. Been playing Scruggs style for 30 years and strumming / finger picking guitar for about the same. I'll return to this post in about 6 months and let you know how it's going.

Would love to hear opinions / experiences from others who have attempted the same transition.

Cheers,

Reis.

5stringJim - Posted - 01/02/2018:  04:14:08


Only get a square-neck if you want to play flat on your knee, eg, Bluegrass, Hawaiian style. Round neck is like a standard guitar, bottleneck blues, where you need the action low enough to fret notes, but high enough to rattle into slide playing.
Additionally, you have 2 or 3 different types of cone in the resonators: these will give vastly different tones.
Biscuit cone: this is a blues style sound. The cone is a simple upside-down speaker shape, with the bridge acting like the magnet of a speaker. Round domed cover plate with various hole patterns.
Spider: So called because the bridge is held up by an aluminum spider-web shaped contraption, and the cone is a different shape. Classic Bluegrass hollow whining sound. Round domed cover with large holes in it.
Tri-cone: has 3 small cones, and a strange triangular waffle-plate cover. Nice mellow tones. Blues or Hawaiian.
Then you have metal body or wood body.........good luck, none are that hard to play.

5stringJim - Posted - 01/02/2018:  04:15:38


P.S you can browse the Resohangout, tons of info on there.

Renfrew - Posted - 01/02/2018:  05:11:15


Yeah I got most of that information from the Reso Hangout 5stringjim. That's how I came to settle on the Gold Tone PBS square neck.

Thanks for the additional chum.

Fathand - Posted - 01/02/2018:  05:37:47


dupreejan by bottleneck I am assuming you are looking for a round neck guitar to play bottleneck style.
I had same ideas and have a 50s? square neck dobro and a 36 National Round neck.

Yes G (Spanish) tuning, DGDGBD matches up pretty good to banjo open G playing as does Dobro Tuning GBDGBD. For bottleneck playing they usually use the Spanish. When tuned open D (Vastopol) DADF#AD you are now close to Open D Banjo Tuning or aDF#AD' or E a whole tone higher.

Yes it is easy to barre with a slide and play major chords up and down the neck. It gets trickier when you want to add melody notes or bass runs or play a minor or 7th or some other chord. A slide on your finger is less dexterious than 4 left hand fingers. You also need to figure out what to do about the 5th string drone you used to play on your banjo. A low bass note on 5th or 6th may have a better or worse effect.

At any rate a lot of the skills and theory and melody notes will transfer over but you will have to learn some new ones.

dupreejan - Posted - 01/02/2018:  14:18:34


Thanks to everybody for the info. I have watched some tutorial lesson videos on the round neck resos. The metal body ones sound cool. And except for learning to use the slide on the 3rd. or 4th. finger it appears to play just like a banjo in open tuning. I already play Little Martha on the Banjo perfectly, and would like to play it on the roundneck reso, on this song Duane Allman did'nt use a slide, it is all finger picking, and I think I could figure out when to hit the 5th and 6th strings. Also, the Led Zeppelin Travelin Riverside Blues Lesson did'nt look too difficult either, just getting the knack of playing with a bar on your finger, and sliding.

dupreejan - Posted - 01/02/2018:  14:22:45


quote: Yeah, I am only interested in the round neck style to finger fret, and 3  finger pick, since that would be the closet to the banjo.  I also wanted to use a slide on 1 finger for Blues songs.

Originally posted by Fathand

dupreejan by bottleneck I am assuming you are looking for a round neck guitar to play bottleneck style.

I had same ideas and have a 50s? square neck dobro and a 36 National Round neck.



Yes G (Spanish) tuning, DGDGBD matches up pretty good to banjo open G playing as does Dobro Tuning GBDGBD. For bottleneck playing they usually use the Spanish. When tuned open D (Vastopol) DADF#AD you are now close to Open D Banjo Tuning or aDF#AD' or E a whole tone higher.



Yes it is easy to barre with a slide and play major chords up and down the neck. It gets trickier when you want to add melody notes or bass runs or play a minor or 7th or some other chord. A slide on your finger is less dexterious than 4 left hand fingers. You also need to figure out what to do about the 5th string drone you used to play on your banjo. A low bass note on 5th or 6th may have a better or worse effect.



At any rate a lot of the skills and theory and melody notes will transfer over but you will have to learn some new ones.






 

beegee - Posted - 01/02/2018:  15:57:00


quote:

Originally posted by RioStat

I bought a square-neck dobro, thinking the same thoughts as you about "it should be easy to switch over".........I've never been able to figure out one single thing on that damn instrument!



I've played guitar for as long I can remember, banjo for decades, I can saw a couple fiddle tunes, chop chords and take a few breaks on the mandolin,  even thump some upright bass, but I've met my match with that dobro !



Not to say that your reso guitar endeavours will be the same as mine............ go for it!






I have never liked dobro enough to want to play one. I have a  friend's Harlow here for sale(for the past 7-8 years)and I occasioanlly take it out of the case and try to play a tune on it. I think it's too much trouble to bother with.

dupreejan - Posted - 01/02/2018:  20:37:05


youtu.be/2m6aoucWMLQ  Does'nt seem too much different than Scruggs except he is using a slide.


Edited by - dupreejan on 01/02/2018 20:44:18

Tom Hanway - Posted - 01/06/2018:  19:12:24


quote:

Originally posted by dupreejan

I''m thinking of buying a Bottle neck Resonator Guitar. Has anybody started playing one after learning 5 string banjo, since they play just like a 5 string banjo when tuned to open D, E, or G, with the added benefit of the 2 bass strings, I figure they can't be to hard to cross over to while using a slide on 1 finger. I just got to play Allman Bros. Little Martha, and Led Zeppelin's Travelin Riverside Blues.






Ah, hey, man, tunings, don't forget Open C: CGCGCE. It's old cotton field, try it, man, and notice how it's good to have heavy strings where it matters.  Ask around.  Think .. Son House.



Open C: CGCGCE.



All the best, brothers, sisters, men, ladies, and you!



Tomás

Jim Yates - Posted - 01/06/2018:  21:47:34


I like to occasionally play with a slide on my banjo in open G or open D. It takes a much lighter slide than on a guitar, since my action is lower, but it's a lot of fun.

John Gribble - Posted - 01/07/2018:  07:22:56


I play both bottleneck (round neck) and steel/Dobro style. Not a lot of banjo, beyond the tunings, transfers over. The major issue is string muting, which we don't hardly ever discuss with most fretted instruments, beyond chord comping.



They are different beasts, believe me.


Edited by - John Gribble on 01/07/2018 07:25:03

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