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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: BANJO ACCESSORIES BOX from scrap!


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/251270

rudy - Posted - 12/10/2012:  19:16:46



Banjo accessories pick, tuner, capo box:





 



Here is something to do with all that scrap that accumulates in the process of building banjos.  This came about as a result of asking about what others here on the Hangout used for pick boxes:



banjohangout.org/topic/248902



This particular box is made from scrap that’s too good to pitch, but you wonder what you’re ever going to do with.  The basic box is 3” by 5” by 2-1/4” deep, but dimensions can obviously be altered to match your lifestyle and needs.  Heck, you can make it footstool or coffee table size if you want.  “Hey honey!  Come see what I made you!”



They would make a nice gift for your favorite picking friend, too.



 After seeing some of the clever storage solutions that folks came up with I decided maybe I’d relegate the Rubbermaid dish to the closet and put something a bit nicer on my desk to hold my tuner, picks, and capos for various instruments.  A project such as this might just be a way for folks that want to try their hand at inlay or fretwork before actually committing to building an actual instrument. 



 A few quick notes about the photos shown as attachments:



1. Ebony scrap, neck blank off-cut, scrap pearl, banding strip pieces, fret wire.



2. Miter ends of box sections, glue together, reinforce corners with inside triangle strips.



3. Copy/paste this and print out to desired size.  Alternate sizes are also shown.



4. Scrap 3/32” “puzzle pieces” (center) glued to 1/8” thick top (bottom).



5. Pattern attached to pearl with heavy duty double sided carpet tape. Shape cut out and outline scribed around desired inlay area after a bit of white tempera paint is smeared on and dry.  This makes a really good line to work to when routing the inlay recess.



6. The rear of another print of the pattern is colored with black Crayola and the pattern is taped over the inlay and the lines are traced over with a pencil point.



7. The Crayola transfers very nicely to the pearl inlay.



8. The box is cut open with a band saw after the top inlay work is completed.  Small holes are drilled and short sections of dowel are glued into the lid portion of the holes.  The short bit that protrudes at the bottom of the lid registers the alignment of the top and bottom sections of the box.  Finish sanding inside and out and a coat of your favorite finish completes the project.  I used a coat of Butcher’s Wax on the completed box.



The sections are placed together, sanded to do final leveling, and the front inlay band recessed into the front surface.  The inlay band acts as a quick way to ensure that you are mating the box sections together correctly. 











Banjolution - Posted - 12/10/2012:  19:42:00



 Great idea,and a beautiful box Rudy! Thanks for the inspiration...


DanKnowles - Posted - 12/10/2012:  20:04:20



What a great idea!!!! Lord knows I've got a lot of scrap I just can't toss.


banjocatman - Posted - 12/10/2012:  20:15:22


Beautiful work!

Fathand - Posted - 12/11/2012:  04:27:16



I have an old Black Diamond Strings box. A little smaller than a shoe box I use.


Rooster59 - Posted - 12/11/2012:  05:21:56


Nice work!

pickn5 - Posted - 12/11/2012:  07:39:23


A beautiful box, you should be proud.

Tim13 - Posted - 12/11/2012:  13:13:59



Nicely done!  That looks too nice to use for a pick/capo box....lol.



 



Tim


chickenpickin - Posted - 12/11/2012:  13:14:01



Cool idea and a beautiful job, Rudy!!



Here's a ring jewelry box I made for my daughter-in-law last Christmas from shop scraps. The top lid is ebony with satinwood and the base is mildly curly soft maple. I'm not very good at drawing butterflies but I think it's recognizable.



 



Tim



Edited by - chickenpickin on 12/11/2012 13:21:42




Jonnycake White - Posted - 12/12/2012:  08:28:06



quote:


Originally posted by rudy




6. The rear of another print of the pattern is colored with black Crayola and the pattern is taped over the inlay and the lines are traced over with a pencil point.



7. The Crayola transfers very nicely to the pearl inlay.






 This is brilliant.  Why haven't I heard of this technique before?



That's a very nice box and a great theme.  I like the butterfly box also.


rudy - Posted - 12/12/2012:  09:14:18



quote:


Originally posted by Jonnycake White



quote:


Originally posted by rudy



6. The rear of another print of the pattern is colored with black Crayola and the pattern is taped over the inlay and the lines are traced over with a pencil point.


7. The Crayola transfers very nicely to the pearl inlay.



 This is brilliant.  Why haven't I heard of this technique before?



That's a very nice box and a great theme.  I like the butterfly box also.






 Thanks, Jon.  I don't think of it as brilliant, it's probably been done many times before.  I just look for a reasonable solution for how to jump over the next hurdle no matter what I'm doing, and I can  generally find a pretty quick and painless answer.  It's not easy to get something to stick to pearl that's been sanded to 400 or finer, and it seemed like Crayola might work pretty well.  It did.



I've used carbon paper for several projects in the past, but this was a lot easier to do.  Carbon paper is becoming increasingly difficult to find...smiley


Jonnycake White - Posted - 12/13/2012:  10:00:01



I've got a good sized stack of carbon paper but it's a hassle to use and doesn't seem to work all that well.  But I confess I've never tried it on pearl or bone (my default inlay material).


rudy - Posted - 12/13/2012:  11:33:03



quote:


Originally posted by Jonnycake White



I've got a good sized stack of carbon paper but it's a hassle to use and doesn't seem to work all that well.  But I confess I've never tried it on pearl or bone (my default inlay material).




Carbon paper works best when really fresh, but not all that well in any case.  Try the Crayola-covered pattern back.  You'll be pleasantly surprised.  It will rub off obviously, but you're really only looking for something to serve as a guide for the graving of lines on the pearl in this case. 



Edited by - rudy on 12/13/2012 11:35:39

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