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 Playing Advice: 4-String (Jazz, Blues & Other Trad Styles)
 ARCHIVED TOPIC: Tango banjo?


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/236752

KingStudent - Posted - 05/22/2012:  13:14:09



So we all know, or at least have been told, that the 4-string banjo was originally (or at least for a certain period) called the "tango" banjo.  In fact it's not obvious that the term "tenor" isn't a corruption or variant of this.  My question is, if this is so then where is the tango music played on the banjo in, say, 1905-1925?  Not jazz -- plenty of that is available both in written and recorded form.  But tango?  I have some archival recordings of old Argentine tango, but they mainly use guitar in a quasi-flamenco style (along with other instruments).  And in any case the tango banjo is presumably an American innovation.  Your thoughts?  Thanks!


skip sail - Posted - 05/22/2012:  14:24:14


now,i am not sure,but didnt vega market an extremely short scale 4 string as a "tango" banjo,rather than a tenor? I have seen one,it was like a 4 string banjo-mando,or a really large banjo uke. Not a tenor banjo in the usually accepted sense at all.

KingStudent - Posted - 05/22/2012:  14:31:58



Good call!  Here is an example.


Dave Frey - Posted - 05/22/2012:  14:42:21


It's my understanding that tango (later tenor) banjos were used in banjo orchestras of the time. There was music written for four banjo parts and larger "orchestras" playing ragtime and classical music. It wasn't that different from the string quartets of today. Banjos had previously been in minstrel shows which was not considered "main stream" music back then. The banjo was frowned upon. Banjo manufacturers (and others) wanted to "legitimize" the banjo by having more "acceptable" music played. Of course, the whole idea was to increase the sale of banjos and sheet music. Today, it's called the "classic banjo" style. The American Banjo Fraternity is dedicated to keeping that style of music alive.

KingStudent - Posted - 05/22/2012:  14:57:21



So I could search for tango music as played in the classic banjo style.  Interesting!


KingStudent - Posted - 05/22/2012:  15:29:31



Here is a recording of Fred Van Eps playing tango on a banjo, from 1912, courtesy of the Library of Congress National Jukebox.


cockneybanjo - Posted - 05/22/2012:  15:44:59



the mandolin-size, 10" pot, 4-string instrument tuned as for a mandolin, is also sometimes referred to as a "banjolin" in modern nomenclature. Either way, it's a rare beast. I have a 1960s version made by Weltton ( an East German manufacturer known particularly for banjo ukes ) and it sounds like a sack of cats being vigorously trodden on; there are some rather sweeter ones to be seen on youtube, so the obvious conslusion is that if you are going to play an instrument of this nature, get a good one!


CGDA - Posted - 05/23/2012:  03:22:46



quote:


Originally posted by KingStudent




Here is a recording of Fred Van Eps playing tango on a banjo, from 1912, courtesy of the Library of Congress National Jukebox.






Thank for sharing the link to this very interesting website. Anyway I remark that Mr. Van Eps doesn't play a "tango (=tenor) banjo" but a 5 string banjo aka "regular banjo".



Marco


beezaboy - Posted - 05/23/2012:  03:30:50



Tango Banjo was a phrase used by some manufacturers, most notably Orpheum,  to describe a Tenor Banjo.



Jim Bollman has cataloged a Vega 19 3/4" scale four string banjo manufactured in 1908.  He has cataloged several others for the period 1909-1911.



Chas. McNeil reported that he purchased a Vega "tenor banjo" in Nov. 1909.



The tango was introduced in America in 1910.  Vega was already manufacturing tenor banjos befor the arrival of the tango.



The tenor banjo was originated to supply a dance band banjo.  Social dancing had become quite popular in the aughts (Turkey Trot, Bunny Hop, etc. called "Animal" or "Hug and Tussle" dances in the literature today).  The tenor banjo supplanted the mandolin banjo because mandolin banjo tuning was too high to deliver a banjoey tone.  The tenor banjo supplanted the 5-string banjo because, as a rule,  the finger stylists could not tremolo and 5-string banjo tuning required too much shifting about the neck to play melody from the violin or piano score.  The tenor banjo began as a melody instrument.  It changed to the rhythm section of the band commencing about the mid to late teens.



Meanwhile, Vega advertised that it sold a "Tenor Banjo" in 1912.  In 1913 Vega advertised some testimonials from Vega "Tenor Banjo" purchasers.



In 1915, jobber Buegeleisen & Jacobson. cataloged their entry in the field as "Cello-Tango Banjo Mandolin".  This banjo may have been made by Rettberg & Lange because in 1916 Orpheum began to advertise it's house brand Orpheum product as a "Tango Banjo".



Orpheum was not diligent in offering the tenor banjo and was way behind Vega in this regard.  At the 1915 convention of The American Guild of Banjoists, Mandolinists and Guitarists the name "Tenor Banjo" was applied to the new four string, shorter neck than 5-string, banjo tuned CGDA..  Notwithstanding this resolution Orpheum called it's product "Tango Banjo". 



In 1915, Myron Bickford commented that the banjo most used in NYC dance orchestras was the "Tenor Banjo" that was tuned CGDA.



 It may have been Orpheum, then, that muddied the water concerning the "Tenor Banjo"  proper name but, if not, Orpheum certainly contributed to the confusion by terming their product "Tango Banjo".  (Orpheum finally changed the name of its banjo to "Tenor Banjo" later in the teens).



The confusion regarding the "Tenor Banjo"/"Tango Banjo" names is that some people may think they are different types of banjos (eg. a "Tango Banjo" is 17 frets and a "Tenor Banjo is 19 frets or some such).  Actually, a "Tango Banjo" and a "Tenor Banjo" are the same banjo with some variations in scale length depending on manufacturer but most with 17 frets (Gibson did 15 frets??) in the beginning and 19 frets after 1921 Paramount "modern" tenor banjo.



The 4-string mandolin scale neck instrument is usually called a Melody Banjo and did not factor in to the origin of the tenor banjo.  The Melody Banjo is nothing more than a four string mandolin banjo with the same faults as the eight string variety - Too High Pitched.



 


CGDA - Posted - 05/23/2012:  03:53:08


There's also an uncertainty on the term "tenor" referred to this kind of banjo. I think that has nothing to do with the scale range or the tone of the instrument, oppositely to the saxophones, for example.
Marco

KingStudent - Posted - 05/23/2012:  04:40:22



Thanks to everyone for these interesting and enlightening comments.



On this: "Thank for sharing the link to this very interesting website [the Library of Congress National Jukebox]."  I actually learned about it from a BHO posting some time ago.  I go through periods of listening to it a lot; other times I think of what the paleontologists say about the fossil record -- we know a lot about the animals that left fossils (because they had hard skeletons or whatever), but next to nothing about the others, or what else was going on at the time.



On Mr. Van Eps: that is remarkable playing on a 5-string -- very impressive!



On this: "The tenor banjo supplanted the 5-string banjo because, as a rule, the finger stylists could not tremolo and 5-string banjo tuning required too much shifting about the neck to play melody from the violin or piano score."  I have worked through Wm. C. Stahl's New Method for Plectrum Banjo and Arthur W. Black's A Practical Plectrum Method for the Standard Banjo (1919-1920), both in CGBD tuning.  Black in particular says "Where a sustained tone was impossible with the finger playing, a sustained tone, with crescendo and diminuendo, is easily produced [with the plectrum]."  However, on the CGBD tuning, I can see that it would be hard to read from a violin score, but both of these books are written in standard notation, for the older non-5ths tuning, with some fairly challenging material.  I wonder if the tenor banjoists were too quick to abandon that tuning (which seems to have been the norm for the lower 4 strings of the 5-string at the time)?



On this: "There's also an uncertainty on the term "tenor" referred to this kind of banjo. I think that has nothing to do with the scale range or the tone of the instrument, oppositely to the saxophones, for example."  That makes sense because there isn't a bass/tenor/alto/soprano hierarchy for banjos, generally speaking, to my knowledge.  But my knowledge, as is demonstrated here, is woefully incomplete!



Edited by - KingStudent on 05/23/2012 04:42:26

beezaboy - Posted - 05/23/2012:  06:00:24



Ah ha!  Stahl and Black plectrum style for the Five String Banjo In C Notation.  I'll offer some generalizations:



I submit, these methods (there are earlier ones and one such method was published serially in The Cadenza) are a part of the origin and deveopment of the Plectrum Banjo.  I believe that the entrenched 5-string "guitar style" players from the heyday of the "classical banjo", 1890-1900, inhibited the use of the pick upon the 5-string banjo.  With some practice the pick will enable the tremolo.  However, many of the well known 5-string players lobbied (railed) against the use of the pick on the 5-string during the aughts.  They expressed their views as though to do so was heresy and was an insult to the iconic instrument itself.  This state of affairs enabled the mandolinists to forge the tenor banjo tuned in 5ths (not thirds) and welcome in the dance band by violinists and mandolinists and the written music of the day.  Had the opinionated "leaders" of the regular banjo fraternity not so vehemently disclaimed the use of a pick the history of the four string banjo may have been quite different.  As it was, the tenor banjo was conceived and gained momentum as the proper dance band banjo and the popularity of the 5-string banjo swooned.  The plecrtrum banjo, I submit, was slow to develop and when it arrived was "always" (means "Jazz Age") eclipsed by the tenor due, in part, to the early intransigence (sic) of the old timers to recognize the value of "Plectrum Style" on the 5-string banjo.



Just sayin'


CGDA - Posted - 05/23/2012:  06:24:38




 



On this: "There's also an uncertainty on the term "tenor" referred to this kind of banjo. I think that has nothing to do with the scale range or the tone of the instrument, oppositely to the saxophones, for example."  That makes sense because there isn't a bass/tenor/alto/soprano hierarchy for banjos, generally speaking, to my knowledge.  But my knowledge, as is demonstrated here, is woefully incomplete!



​The big one you can see here seems to be the only banjo that might be ranked by its scale/tone.



​I read somewhere that it is a "bass banjo":



  youtu.be/YzN5K6rX2to



I suppose that these rare instruments are generally made by luthiers, not manufactured in series.



Marco



 




 


Edited by - CGDA on 05/23/2012 06:28:42

mikeyes - Posted - 05/23/2012:  08:03:55


The bass banjo seen on the clip mentioned above is a rare instrument - I've seen a Gibson version at Bernunzio's. That size banjo has the same problems that the bass mandolin has, they sound terrible compared to a 3/4 bass viol. In addition they are huge and expensive to make. Imagine trying to get a quality banjo skin large enough to use :grin:

Here is a modern bass banjo: goldtone.com/products/details/...anjo-Bass

Mike Keyes

Polle Flaunoe - Posted - 05/23/2012:  08:16:39



Marco,



Oh - you do for sure know your ways - making me laughing and smiling!



Do btw. notice the great playing skills of the tenor players in this recording - John Hoft describes in his article "The Tenor Banjo Story" the generally declining skills for tenor banjoists during the 30s - like this:



"Moreover, the faults of the average tenor banjoist contributed to its downfall as well. The commercial appeal of the tenor banjo had attracted players who were drawn to the instrument for its money making possibilities and not for its potential as a musical instrument. As a result, many orchestra banjoists failed to perfect their play and exhibited poor technique."



​IMHO - this went generally on since then.



Can´t we agree on bringing back or up playing skills as more general in the 20s?  I´m in the progress developing completely new rhythm and solo playing techniques - related to classic jazz - more about this much later this year - I guess, that you for one will be interested in learning about this.



big



Polle



 


CGDA - Posted - 05/23/2012:  13:10:01



quote:


Originally posted by Polle Flaunoe




" I guess, that you for one will be interested in learning about this."



 



big



Polle



 






For sure...!! yesenlightened



Marco


CGDA - Posted - 05/23/2012:  13:33:31


It's really fun that I've found tangos played on 5 string banjo (Van Eps) and on plectrum banjo (Cynthia Sayer) but not on "tango banjo" !!
I propose to ask Eddy Davis to be the first player playing a tango on a "tango banjo ". (Incidentally he's my favorite banjo player and I think he's able to play everything he wants IN PERFECT JAZZ SPIRIT. )
Marco

skip sail - Posted - 05/23/2012:  17:22:18


Great info Beezaboy!

Polle Flaunoe - Posted - 05/23/2012:  23:41:56



Marco,



My/our new rhythm patterns/techniques are entirely related to Tango (Habanera/Spanish Tinge) - so maybe I´ll have to start calling my beloved ones Tango Banjo´s.



wink



Polle


CGDA - Posted - 05/24/2012:  04:39:45



quote:


Originally posted by Polle Flaunoe




Marco,



My/our new rhythm patterns/techniques are entirely related to Tango (Habanera/Spanish Tinge) - so maybe I´ll have to start calling my beloved ones Tango Banjo´s.



wink



Polle






Hi Polle.



I remark that you know very well how to tickle my curiosity...!devil



Marco


Cottonmouth - Posted - 05/24/2012:  09:13:42



Here is my melody banjo, a 1910 Fairbanks-Vega Tu-ba-phone with 10-1/8" rim and 17" scale neck (basically a 4-string mandolin banjo). Click on the photo for a closer peek.




   

beezaboy - Posted - 05/24/2012:  13:19:58



Ken - It is possible that your last post here could be minconstrued.  There doesn't seem to be any evidence that Melody Banjos were made as early as 1910.  Isn't your Melody Banjo a 1927 Vega Little Wonder Melody neck married to an earier Tubaphone pot?


Cottonmouth - Posted - 05/24/2012:  16:38:13



Yes Sir, this is the same instrument I recently set up with a '27 Little Wonder neck & dowel. I am not attempting to confuse/deceive anyone, just providing a picture of the melody banjo. Perhaps you might be able to shed some light as to which "mandolin banjo" came first, the 8-string or the 4-string. The earliest photo of a 4-string Fairbanks-Vega I've seen was a 1919.


beezaboy - Posted - 05/24/2012:  17:19:08



The first mandolin banjo is credited to John Farris with his patented Banjolin in 1885.



The first mandolin banjos were small with 7"-8" rims.



These small mandolin banjos achived a some measure of popularity in the 1890's.



With the advent of the dance bands in the aughts the mandolin banjo was enlarged to about 10" heads with more substantial construction.  These "improvements" were made during the same era as the "invention" of the tenor banjo 1908-1910.  Now called Banjo Mandolins these instruments were often used in dance bands but were quickly replaced by the tenor banjo because Banjo Mandolins were too shrill.



The history of the Melody Banjo is unknown to me.  The famous circa 1915 staged photo of Europe's band with stacked banjos appear to depict a couple of Melody Banjos.  I would guess that the first manufactured Melody Banjos occured about 1915.  However, it was quite easy to omit the paired strings and play the Banjo Mandolin with just four strings in order to eliminate distracting overtones.  It is anyone's guess as to when this practice was begun.



Here is one of my favorite Melody Banjos....orgs.usd.edu/nmm/PluckedString...anjo.html 


Polle Flaunoe - Posted - 05/25/2012:  12:41:32



Marco,



Well - it may take a while before I´ll be recording some of my new stuff or anything at all - but in order keeping you busy in the meantime - do f.ex. "bake" something on basis of this recipe, that I put together yesterday forenoon and tested in the afternoon using my best friend as a guinea pig (he´s a really great DGBE tenor banjoist): 



1)  Listen to this recording youtube.com/watch?v=Vio-TjMi5_s - try combining drums, bass, guitar and piano in your head into ONE rhythm instrument / pulse.



2)  Now practice and play the rhythmic part of a 4/4 version of All of Me on your tenor banjo pretending, that all these instruments and their common pulse as mentioned are presented by this (I have a strong feeling, that you can do this).



3)  Now practice, play and record the same - only now as a 6/8 version - but with somehow the same pulse (I take, that you´ll also be able doing this - it may take some or a lot of time).



4)  Now add a second track - playing melody and later an improvised single string solo on your guitar.



Once there - tell me and others about your experiences during the progresses - you´ll be surprised, I guess.



wink



Polle



 



PS!



​For getting a sense of the 6/8 version - do also listen to the B-part of this recording of St. Louis Blues: youtube.com/watch?v=P5QFR4whDd...3576B0B13



 



Edited by - Polle Flaunoe on 05/25/2012 12:51:45

CGDA - Posted - 05/26/2012:  03:54:30



quote:


Originally posted by Polle Flaunoe




Marco,



Well - it may take a while before I´ll be recording some of my new stuff or anything at all - but in order keeping you busy in the meantime - do f.ex. "bake" something on basis of this recipe, that I put together yesterday forenoon and tested in the afternoon using my best friend as a guinea pig (he´s a really great DGBE tenor banjoist): 



1)  Listen to this recording youtube.com/watch?v=Vio-TjMi5_s - try combining drums, bass, guitar and piano in your head into ONE rhythm instrument / pulse.



2)  Now practice and play the rhythmic part of a 4/4 version of All of Me on your tenor banjo pretending, that all these instruments and their common pulse as mentioned are presented by this (I have a strong feeling, that you can do this).



3)  Now practice, play and record the same - only now as a 6/8 version - but with somehow the same pulse (I take, that you´ll also be able doing this - it may take some or a lot of time).



4)  Now add a second track - playing melody and later an improvised single string solo on your guitar.



Once there - tell me and others about your experiences during the progresses - you´ll be surprised, I guess.



wink



Polle



 



PS!



​For getting a sense of the 6/8 version - do also listen to the B-part of this recording of St. Louis Blues: youtube.com/watch?v=P5QFR4whDd...3576B0B13



 






Polle,



ouch..! I can't read music so I'm not sure about what you mean. I sometimes enjoy playing some 3/4 phrases on a 4/4 accompaniment, but I suppose that your suggestion is different. I feel the B-part of St. Louis Blues (F min) about like a tango. I play it that way and the other musicians of the band never tried to kill me. I asked a friend to explane me what a 6/8 is and HOW IT SOUNDS. He told me that It's a ternary time, the theme  of the movie "A Summer Place" being an example. Incidentally I tell you that Red Hot Peppers and Hot Five/Seven are my daily cup of tea. Do you suggest to play "All of Me" for any particular reason?



Thank you for your suggestions.



Marco



 



Edited by - CGDA on 05/26/2012 03:55:53

Polle Flaunoe - Posted - 05/26/2012:  06:13:50



Marco,



Ha-Ha - got you!



Regarding "A Summer Place" - yes, this is 6/8 - only without any accents.



OK - so you´ll have to be a little patient - I´ll if possible get back later this year with some exciting new rhythm patterns - also for tunes like All of Me. I have my own parts of these almost ready - singers hate them - horns, reeds and other single note players love them - I´m now going to find out about drums and bass.



wink



Polle



 



 


skip sail - Posted - 05/31/2012:  16:03:13


there is an Orpheum 'melody "banjo on ebay for 750 buy it now.

beezaboy - Posted - 05/31/2012:  18:28:12



I saw that Orpheum Melody Banjo on ebay.  It was already in our Orpheum serial number list credited to ebay so it must have been on ebay before this auction and did not sell.



I used to think Melody Banjos pre-dated tenor banjos and were part of the evolution of the tenor banjo.  But, no.  Here is an example of a Melody Banjo (3XXX) but we've listed 5 Orpheum tenor banjos with lower serial numbers in our list.


skip sail - Posted - 05/31/2012:  21:45:41


Is it possible that various manufacturers realised the structural problems of the banjomandolin(too much tension on a skin head,neck set issues etc) as well as how awful they can be to play,and tried to popularize a short scale lead instrument tuned in 5ths to take its place. If it had taken off(i mean,look at the Tiple,how unlikely a success story was that!)we could now be discussing the uncommon,elusive banjo-mandolin.
Now ,wouldnt that be a pleasure?

Polle Flaunoe - Posted - 05/31/2012:  23:02:14



 



I can´t recall having seen a melody banjo in a catalog - except for the early 20s Paramount catalog.



John - have you seen this banjo type in other catalogs or in any ads?



Polle


CGDA - Posted - 06/01/2012:  03:12:10



quote:


Originally posted by Polle Flaunoe




 



I can´t recall having seen a melody banjo in a catalog - except for the early 20s Paramount catalog.



John - have you seen this banjo type in other catalogs or in any ads?



Polle






Hi Polle.



It seems there is a bit of  uncertainty in naming these banjos, are they Melody Banjos ?



http://www.musurgia.com/searchresults.asp?CartID=8824843312005&keyword=ukulele&submit=Search



Marco


beezaboy - Posted - 06/01/2012:  03:21:36



The Melody Banjo story is a mystery to me.  I've not seen mention of it in the period magazines.



I think Europe's band is the entity that spawned the Melody Banjo.  And I think the spawning took place about 1915ish when Europe was the orchestra for the Castle dance couple.  It appears that some of Europe's mandolin banjo players strung their instruments with just 4 strings.  Europe's band received a good deal of attention and exposure through the Castle's and the 4-string mandolin banjo as well. 



I personally have a Bruno branded Melody Banjo and a 4-string banjo mandolin is listed in the 1917 Bruno catalog supplement that I saw on the Vintaxe site.


beezaboy - Posted - 06/01/2012:  03:27:52



On the Bruno Banjo-Mandolin page of the 1917 catalog the banjo is listed:



"'Quality' Bruno Four String Banjo Mandolin".  It is listed with 10" head; 24 brackets; 4 strings; $35.


banjopa - Posted - 06/02/2012:  08:27:21



Some years ago I acquired a 5 string banjo. Vega Whyte Laydie, 17 frets, the C, G,and D strings were singles, the A string was doubled up like a mandolin. All the strings went to the peghead. The serial number on it was 30383 which put it's date of manufacture in late 1913 or early 1914. I was not comfortable with it. I let it sit for years. It needed to be refinished and a lot of other work done on it. So, I purchased a tenor neck for full scale 19 frets and fitted that neck to that rim. Sold it a while after that, but kept the neck. I finally plugged the 5th string hole that was in the middle of the peghead, had it finished and purchased a Stewart McDonald Whyte Laydie pot and finished it to match the neck. Then I made a flush fit resonator with the pie sections and attached it to the dowel. It spins on and off. I still have it, sounds good and is a good player. What I don't know about it is how many were made like this with the 5 strings and what can any of you tell me about it. I have never seen another one like it or even any photos of one. 

Steve


banjopa - Posted - 06/02/2012:  08:41:04



I will try to put some photos of it here. The front of the banjo, the back of the banjo and the peghead. If you look close at the peghead, you can see where the peg was in the middle of the pearl. I will post a few more photos of it.

Steve




front


back


peghead

banjopa - Posted - 06/02/2012:  08:43:49



Here are 3 more photos of this banjo.




resonator


side view


dowel with serial number

banjopa - Posted - 06/02/2012:  08:46:17



Here is one more photo. It shows the style of the banjo. Vega Whyte Laydie,  Style B. Can anyone tell me more about that?




   

beezaboy - Posted - 06/02/2012:  11:32:50



Bob Smakula recently had one of those five-string tenor banjos.



Perhaps he can give you some information about them.



I had never seen or heard of one until Bob told me about his recently.



You might be able to see the photos of it at:



smakula.com/images/Banjos/Vega30376/">smakula.com/images/Banjos/Vega30376/ 


banjopa - Posted - 06/02/2012:  11:46:19



John, That is it! This one is a tubaphone, but that is the same style. Thanks for showing that to me! The serial number on this one is just a few numbers lower than mine, which tells me it was made just about the same time as the one I have was made.

Steve


beezaboy - Posted - 09/09/2012:  07:02:07



Hey, I was fortunate to get this Guckert's Chords for the "TANGO BANJO" on Amazon for just a few dollars.



I bought it because I hoped it might shed some light on what is a "TANGO BANJO".



In the "Instructions" it appears that Mr. Guckert describes the "TANGO BANJO" as a four string mandolin banjo which is what we now call a Melody Banjo.



Well, this doesn't really clear the air but it reinforces my belief that a "Tango Banjo" could be anything from a mandolin banjo to a tenor banjo to (now) a melody banjo.  The term "Tango Banjo" was not recognized by the American Guild of Banjoists, Mandolinists, and Guitarists.  The term "Tango Banjo" was used by a few manufacturers and jobbers to try to associate their banjo with the dance orchestras that were proliferating in the teens.  In short, "Tango Banjo" was an advertising term.



I have "always" thought that the "Tenor Banjo" derived its name from the "Tenor Mandola" from which its tuning was derived.



Interestingly, the Tenor Mandola was an 8-string (four courses of pairs) instrument but Guckert describes it as a 4-string??  Maybe by 1919 someone was making 4-string Tenor Mandolas??



 



EDIT - Hey, I just thought.  You know I think the term "Melody Banjo" to describe a 4-string mandolin banjo was coined by Wm. L. Lange in his 1926(?) catalog.  Before that the 4-string mandolin banjo did not have a name.  Maybe Guckert used the term "Tango Banjo" because he didn't know what else to call the 4-string mandolin banjo??



Edited by - beezaboy on 09/09/2012 07:15:44



Guckert's Chords 1919


Guckert's Chords - Page Two

Polle Flaunoe - Posted - 09/09/2012:  08:23:28



John,



I know next to nothing about the mandolin family - but I´ve noticed from Ry Cooder´s tuning overview ww w.rycooder.nl/pages/ry_cooder_tunings_instruments.htm a difference between American and European Mandola´s.



American Mandola - 4 strings tuned C-G-D-A



European Mandola - 8 strings tuned GG-dd-aa-e1e1 (one octave lower than a mandolin)



????



This does however fit Guckert´s description of a mandola.



big



Polle


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