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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: I'm bored. Need a new song to learn (TBR)


Please note this is an archived topic, so it is locked and unable to be replied to. You may, however, start a new topic and refer to this topic with a link: http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/136996

banjopocolypse - Posted - 01/15/2009:  09:06:58


Tenor Banjo Related....

I'm bored witht the songs I'm playing now. I started learning Tainted Love though, and that seems like it was tailor made for the tenor, except I can only find the first page of the music online, and I have to pay 4.50 for the rest of it. Maybe I should just break down and do it.

But thats just one song. I'm getting tired of the rest. This is what I play every night:

Bye Bye Blues
5 foot 2
You are my sunshine
home on the range
if you knew suzie
on moonlight bay
by the light of the silvery moon
deed I do


I'm getting bored with these. What are some other banjo standards that I should be learning?

and on the flip side...

what non-standards are people learning? Like Tainted Love isn't a standard but so far works really well and is good for a laugh if nothing else. I thinking learning some Nirvana tunes might be good for a laugh as well....



NYCJazz - Posted - 01/15/2009:  10:21:31


Probably the all-time classic is "The World is Waiting for the Sunrise".

A really good reference is the David Littlefield fake books.

It ain't cheap, but you get a LOT of music!

They're lead sheets, so they just have melody & chords, but they are very accurate and some have lyrics & playing notes.

Something I just came across is the iTunes collection "Vintage Jazz". $17 for over 170 songs! Ended up being almost 1GB of music.

Between those two, you'll never be bored again!

Another "must have" is the collection of all the Louis Armstrong Hot Fives & Hot Sevens recordings from the twenties.




It''s taken me all my life to learn what not to play.

~ Dizzy Gillespie

banjopocolypse - Posted - 01/15/2009:  10:38:54


Yeah, world is waiting and Avalon seem to be pretty popular amongst the banjoists..... I've got tons of vintage jazz mp3s, but some of them seem hard to play on the banjo, like Kansas City Kitty. I don't know why, but that one just doesn't seem to translate well. (as a solo peice, I mean).

steve davis - Posted - 01/15/2009:  17:32:33


The fellow that showed my dad how to set up and play a pedal steel also played other instruments.
He played an old segmented resonator Vega tenor.All I ever heard him play on that banjo were Schottiches.
My mother's grandparents moved here from Yorkshire and when Junior Crute played his tenor, mom danced a Schottische.


7ball

NYCJazz - Posted - 01/15/2009:  20:47:39


One of the songs I'm working on now is Scatter Brain (Benny Goodman, not Jeff Beck or Radiohead)

The instructions read "Moderato Schottische Tempo".

BTW "God Save the Queen" by Sex Pistols is fun on tenor!





It''s taken me all my life to learn what not to play.

~ Dizzy Gillespie

neplusultra - Posted - 01/15/2009:  23:39:28


I'm going to take your word for your playing level. So, here are the likely tunes that a first year student of mine would be tackling. (the list is in no particular order and is far from complete)

Ain't She Sweet
Alabama Jubilee
Alabamy Bound
Avalon
Baby Face
Bill Bailey
Bye Bye Blues
Bye Bye Blackbird
Darktown Strutter's Ball
Five Foot Two
Heart of My Heart
I'm looking over a Four Leaf Clover
If you knew Susie
It had to be You
It's a long way to Tipperary
I Want a Girl
Just Because
Pearly Shells
Shanty in old Shanty town
Shine on Harvest Moon
Sweet Sue, Just you
When the Saints go Marching In
Yes Sir, That's My Baby
You're Nobody's Sweetheart

Of course, the list is endless. If you can't find a book you like with lot's of songs, you may want to check to see what the larger banjo bands are using. I would suggest contacting the Sacramento, Pittsburgh, Peninsula or Southern California Banjo bands to see if you might be able to secure one of their music books. Most are simply leads sheets with chords, melody line and the lyrics.


Compass56 - Posted - 01/16/2009:  00:18:04


I say, "When in doubt, go Gershwin." To me, the guy wrote the soundtrack to the entire twentieth century. Here are three of his biggies that I do on tenor:

"Our Love is Here to Stay"
"Lady Be Good"
"I Got Rhythm"


Dogface - Posted - 01/16/2009:  08:04:42


Some slower tunes that also sound good:
Whispering
Dream
My Blue Heaven



Thanks,
Mark

If there are no dogs in heaven then when I die I want to go where they went...

Will Rogers

minstrelmike - Posted - 01/16/2009:  08:34:30


I was going to add some songs but neplusultra has the definitive list. I'd also just chord strum my way thru any songbook and see what jumps out at you. (At least they will be new songs and not boring). If you can chord in time, you might even be able to find a dixieland band to play with. Check out church bulletins.

Mike Moxcey
Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
http://moxcey.net

banjopocolypse - Posted - 01/16/2009:  15:29:11


thanks folks!


ps- I HAVE to hear god save the queen!

scotty22 - Posted - 01/17/2009:  09:57:18


quote:
Originally posted by Compass56

I say, "When in doubt, go Gershwin." To me, the guy wrote the soundtrack to the entire twentieth century. Here are three of his biggies that I do on tenor:





I'm in total agreement here. My favorites: "Let's Call the Whole Thing Off"...and, "They Can't Take That Away From Me." Here's my bible: http://www.theguitarguy.com/songs.htm

Or, perhaps try a blues...maybe "Mood Indigo" (I was inspired to undertake tenor when I heard the version by the Preservation Hall Band)

_____________________________
"...fat-arsed, beer-gutted, grey-beared, balding Morris dancers with the little bent pipes clamped in their teeth and scraggly ponytails ... (and the men, too.)"


Edited by - scotty22 on 01/17/2009 10:05:06

Compass56 - Posted - 01/18/2009:  08:32:06


Hey Scotty22:

Your call on "Mood Indigo" is a great one. When I first decided to do that song, I wasn't sure if it would lay well on the tenor (I hadn't heard the P-Hall version at that time.) Once I started to work up the arrangement for "Mood Indigo," I saw that the tenor tuning (C, G, D, A) was perfect for that song in the key of Ab. (I could be wrong, but I believe that Ab is the original key for that song. Please correct me if it was written in another key.)

scotty22 - Posted - 01/18/2009:  18:04:34


I play it in Ab. I don't know where I obtained the arrangement.

______________________________
"...fat-arsed, beer-gutted, grey-beared, balding Morris dancers with the little bent pipes clamped in their teeth and scraggly ponytails ... (and the men, too.)"


Edited by - scotty22 on 01/19/2009 07:28:49

Tom Hanway - Posted - 01/23/2009:  13:13:34


I've gotten my grandfather's Van Eps Recording Banjo restored and set up (tenor - circa 1918), and I'm threatening to play it. All my jazz tunes are on 5-string (melodies) or guitar (comping mainly), but even so, I still would recommend learning "Rhythm changes" in standard jazz keys, starting with the Gershwins' 'I Got Rhythm' (Bb). Also learn them in Ab, Eb, F, C, G, D, A....

I'm partial to really old tunes like 'The World is Waiting for the Sunrise', 'Indiana', 'Big Butter and Egg Man', 'Do You Know What it Means to Miss New Orleans', 'Someday You'll Be Sorry', &c., but you see, my dad's a horn player (cornet and trumpet), so this was the stuff I tapped my foot along to holding onto the bars of my crib - so I'm told - before I could even walk. I'll get back to it, because I really know and love this music deep down.

Hey, don't forget 'Limehouse Blues' (Ab). And 'Exactly Like You' (C) - check out Elana James, singing and playing fiddle worthy of Grappelli or Stuff Smith or Vassar, on Youtube: http://ie.youtube.com/watch?v=R46k0JlNlxw

I adore this artist. I had the great pleasure of playing the same festival with this fine lady, in the Shetland Islands. I took it upon myself to become her coffee boy.... She's got it. };^D>

I love coming to threads like this one and getting an appetite for this stuff. I recorded 'Avalon' with Vassar Clements, sort of a jazzgrass thing ... it's available as a legal digital download, even as a ringtone on the major digital stores.... Also, a medley with the Provincetown Jugband, 'Alabama Jubilee'/'Bye, Bye Blues' - only .99 cents - two for the price of one....

Anyway, I salute y'all for keeping this great music alive. I have some great fakebooks and my dad (a WWII veteran) has promised to give me his entire jazz collection, but I'm in no rush for it.... We've got time to enjoy life, and I jam with him on the guitar in the basement when I'm home....

Happy pickin,

Tom Hanway

Please see my homepage and new digital stores.

''Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.'' - W. B. Yeats


Edited by - Tom Hanway on 01/23/2009 19:17:01

NYCJazz - Posted - 01/23/2009:  14:59:32


Tom

Thanks for the Elana James link. I'd be her coffeeboy any day!






Jazz is the folk music of the machine age.


~ Paul Whiteman

Tom Hanway - Posted - 01/23/2009:  19:18:52


You got it Nathan. The link works now, isn't she a honey? I met her, wow, what a lady.

Please see her in the soul: http://ie.youtube.com/watch?v=R46k0JlNlxw

Happy pickin,

Tom Hanway

Please see my homepage and new digital stores.

''Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.'' - W. B. Yeats


Edited by - Tom Hanway on 01/23/2009 19:20:15

Plectrum Banjoist - Posted - 01/24/2009:  00:43:21


Two outstanding recordings {with plectrum banjo, however) are The old Jim Kweskin Jug Band recordings of 'Mood Indigo' and 'Sadie Green, The Vamp of New Orleans'. Hearing those inspired me to take up the four-string banjo.

Marc L. Bordelon

Compass56 - Posted - 01/26/2009:  12:47:48


If you're looking for 4-string tunes that are not the typical wackadoo banjo standards ("Bye Bye Blues," "Whispering," etc.) go to iTunes and type in Cynthia Sayer. She has recorded many songs that no one would think of as banjo songs. She does them on plectrum, but all of then can easily be moved to tenor. (Well, I can do many of them on tenor, but none of my versions sound 1/10 as great as her versions sound.)

tenorbanjoguy - Posted - 01/26/2009:  22:18:29


But I like wackadoo!! :)

Ken Olmstead
Anchorage, AK

Compass56 - Posted - 01/27/2009:  07:16:22


Easy big fella. I'm not dissing the wackadoo stuff. I just think that 4-string has the potential be so much more than that. My favorite 4-stringers are the ones who play good ol' scrubby, wackadoo stuff and play nice jazz too. (To me, Vappie and Sayer are the quintessential contemporary examples.) Wackadoo is awesome, but there is so much more if one wants it.


Edited by - Compass56 on 01/27/2009 07:17:05

NYCJazz - Posted - 01/27/2009:  07:48:04


Here's an idea:

Do the song from the bar scene in the original Star Wars movie.

You could probably drive people mad trying to figure out where they know the tune from!





You may have holes in your shoes, but don''t let the people out front know it. Shine the tops.
-Earl Hines

Compass56 - Posted - 01/27/2009:  14:53:44


OK Nathan, here's the ultimate version of "Stars Wars." Enjoy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xh9Mko23JeA

paadams - Posted - 01/27/2009:  15:26:39


Suggestions from a 5 string picker. Back Home Again In Indiana, Bully Of The Town, Silver Bells, San Antonio Rose, Under The Double Eagle,
The Farewell Blues, Dear Old Dixie, Cotton Patch Rag.

PAK

tenorbanjoguy - Posted - 01/27/2009:  18:53:43


quote:
Originally posted by Compass56

OK Nathan, here's the ultimate version of "Stars Wars." Enjoy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xh9Mko23JeA





That was just plain creul!! The bar scene would sound GREAT in the "wackadoo" style!

Ken Olmstead
Anchorage, AK

scotty22 - Posted - 01/28/2009:  07:11:33


Yes, wackadoo...and with the "angry German kid" schtick.

______________________________
"...fat-arsed, beer-gutted, grey-beared, balding Morris dancers with the little bent pipes clamped in their teeth and scraggly ponytails ... (and the men, too.)"

ibgrimme - Posted - 02/03/2009:  18:37:32


How about Katy Perry's "Hot and Cold"? Pretty much G-D-Am-C.

NYCJazz - Posted - 02/04/2009:  12:19:07


Tony

That's some real inspirational stuff! I'm getting my trumpet out tonite to jam along!




"First you find the logical way, and when you find it, avoid it, and let your inner self break through and guide you. Don''t try to be anybody else but yourself."

- Will Marion Cook to Duke Ellington

banjopocolypse - Posted - 02/05/2009:  08:08:29


I just got the Littlefield 20s and 30s book. Well I ordered it anyways. I can't wait for it to show up!!!



Dogface - Posted - 02/16/2009:  18:28:45


Really like the suggestion of San Antonio Rose. Great sounding tune. I'm now trying to re-learn 'Take Your Pick' by Pete Mandelli.

Thanks,
Mark

If there are no dogs in heaven then when I die I want to go where they went...

Will Rogers

banjopocolypse - Posted - 02/17/2009:  13:49:50


This littlefield book is SO AWESOME. Tons of songs to learn now!

Polle Flaunoe - Posted - 03/01/2009:  04:18:46


Hi All,

I´ve constructed a personal chord book - I use this when playing as a guest or soloist with many different jazz bands in Northen Europe.

It contans 250-300 standard jazz tunes - many of these in different notations. Most tunes contain original intro, outro, verse, chorus, interlude, modulation etc. plus often lyrics. But no melody lines.

It´s written as an EXCEL file (appr. 1.7 MB). If one or two of you guys is able using this program and adjust the file to your local paper format, translate some of my headlines to english etc. - I´ll gladly mail it directly to you. Maybe one of you can later put it up for more normal use and spread it around.

The file is virus checked - but of course you´ll have to run it through your own virus protection program, firewall etc.

If of any interest - mail me directly at polle@acoustudio.dk

Kindly regards

Polle



Compass56 - Posted - 03/01/2009:  04:54:05


Polle, I'm doing a similar book. I've been working on it for about three months. It's nowhere near ready. My book is going to be different from yours in a a few ways:

The purpose of the thing is to have the chords ready and available for others with whom I play, not for me. The tunes in the book are tunes on which I play the melody and others back me up. There won't be any chord charts for the tunes on which I back others (which constitute most of the tunes of the gigs that I do)

I'm including tunes on which I play the melody on one or more of the of the instruments that I play (tenor banjo, 5-string banjo, 8-string lap steel, and electric guitar). At the top of each page, I'm listing which instrument (or instruments) that I do that particular tune on. Because I'm including tunes for all four instruments, there are jazz tunes, dixieland songs, Hawaiian numbers, bluegrass, Western swing, and some traditional country songs.

I'm only including the main 32 bar section of each tune. Around here, people seem to stay away from the verses.

I'm doing mine in Word format (18 point, Courier font; four measures per line; one song per page; songs alphabetized by title).

Anyway, an early version of the book will be done by July or so, if anyone thinks that he might want to have a copy, email me (lombardo56@hotmail.com) and I'll be glad to send it to you.

Tony




Edited by - Compass56 on 03/15/2009 03:20:39

NYCJazz - Posted - 03/14/2009:  15:14:03


My GF was singing the bombastic 70's rock classic "Carry on my Wayward Son" by Kansas. I picked the banjo, & pretty soon I was power-chording my way through the melody!

The 3-finger guys will have to stick to the delicate, sensitive "Dust in the Wind".




"Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone."

- Pablo Picasso

Compass56 - Posted - 03/15/2009:  03:26:30


Those of you looking for a new 4-string banjo tune on which to work might want to look to bluegrasser Claire Lynch. Claire recorded a tune a few years ago called "Falling in Love" that works great on 4-string banjo. The song has a nice swing feel, and the melody is beautiful. Check it out!

Tony

Nathan, please record the Kansas tune. I need to hear that!

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