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Meles_Meles

United States
7376 posts
since 4/15/12

06/18/2017 19:39:39 View Meles_Meles's Photo Albums View Meles_Meles's Blog Reply with Quote

It may just be me, but I find that the pot/flange/skin combination on resonator banjos is strongly reminiscent of the tambourine. You know, that instrument used mostly as an excuse to put a player's girlfriend up on the stage. :-) Well, you know those little jingly disks inserted into the slots of a tambourine's rim? ( Aha, I see that you do! ) Has anybody ever built jingly disks (do they have an actual name?) into a banjo's rim to change its sound? If so, surely someone out there must know about it...


Edited by - Meles_Meles on 06/18/2017 19:40:52

DiddyBumPlayers Union Member

140 posts since 8/23/11

06/18/2017 21:49:03View DiddyBum's MP3 Archive View DiddyBum's Classified Ads View DiddyBum's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

I've seen a banjo ukulele made with a tambourine, but not a full size.

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sculliganmanPlayers Union Member

40 posts since 7/5/10

06/18/2017 22:14:00 Reply with Quote

Enter "banjo-tam" in the search box.

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rudyPlayers Union Member

United States
10995 posts since 3/27/04

Online

06/19/2017 05:05:47View rudy's MP3 Archive View rudy's Photo Albums View rudy's Blog Reply with Quote

There are lots of examples of banjos made from adapted tambourines, most having the pins pulled and rattles removed.

Rattles are an integral part of many instruments, and a prime example would be the lamellophone family of instruments associated with some forms of indigenous music of Africa.  One of the most common "rattles" on many instruments is provided by the ubiquitous bottle cap.

Here's a Wikipedia article on Mbira,  The one I own was made in Zimbabwe and is nearly identical to the first instrument shown, with bottle caps loosely attached to a metal plate to increase the effect.  Many players place the Mibira inside a large Calabash gourd with still more bottle caps loosely attached around the rim, greatly amplifying the effect.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mbira#Mbira_dzavadzimu

​Rattles aren't popular as part of an instrument meant for performing Western music, as most people diligently try to  get rid of any buzzing that isn't a portion of producing a clear note.

We're also, as a general rule, not working to conjure up the spirit world with the banjo  wink

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Ken LeVanPlayers Union Member

United States
9997 posts since 6/29/05

06/19/2017 05:38:47View Ken LeVan's MP3 Archive View Ken LeVan's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Makes me wonder if anyone has made a banjo with a snare on the bottom of the head like a snare drum - maybe even a second head on the bottom.

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Culloden

United States
1977 posts since 5/29/11

06/19/2017 06:05:32 View Culloden's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

I have seen banjos with a second head on the bottom. I am sure that someone, somewhere has been creative enough to make a snare banjo. I don't know if anyone has had the brazen nerve to promote it though.

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rudyPlayers Union Member

United States
10995 posts since 3/27/04

Online

06/19/2017 06:39:43View rudy's MP3 Archive View rudy's Photo Albums View rudy's Blog Reply with Quote

quote:
Originally posted by Ken LeVan

Makes me wonder if anyone has made a banjo with a snare on the bottom of the head like a snare drum - maybe even a second head on the bottom.


Boucher was a drum maker before branching out to banjos, so it was a natural for him to make the double-headed banjo:

Boucher Double Headed Banjo

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mike gregory

United States
45451 posts since 12/14/05

06/19/2017 12:56:14View mike gregory's MP3 Archive View mike gregory's Photo Albums View mike gregory's Blog Reply with Quote

There's the guy who does it as a BUSINESS.

More info:

https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-mozilla-002&hsimp=yhs-002&hspart=mozilla&p=banjo+tam#id=3&vid=e9cff9be26f34c2f5e69f1fd2db21d26&action=click

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Tobus

United States
912 posts since 11/17/15

06/19/2017 13:49:53 View Tobus's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

quote:
Originally posted by rudy
 

​Rattles aren't popular as part of an instrument meant for performing Western music, as most people diligently try to  get rid of any buzzing that isn't a portion of producing a clear note.

We're also, as a general rule, not working to conjure up the spirit world with the banjo  wink


Well, except for all those fiddlers who put rattlesnake rattles inside their fiddles.  Superstitions and traditions aside, some folks say that the buzzing of the rattles as they lay on the back of the fiddle when playing low notes really enhances the tone and resonance.

(Not that it has anything to do with banjos or tambourines...)

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rudyPlayers Union Member

United States
10995 posts since 3/27/04

Online

06/19/2017 15:05:08View rudy's MP3 Archive View rudy's Photo Albums View rudy's Blog Reply with Quote

quote:
Originally posted by Tobus
 
quote:
Originally posted by rudy
 

​Rattles aren't popular as part of an instrument meant for performing Western music, as most people diligently try to  get rid of any buzzing that isn't a portion of producing a clear note.

We're also, as a general rule, not working to conjure up the spirit world with the banjo  wink


Well, except for all those fiddlers who put rattlesnake rattles inside their fiddles.  Superstitions and traditions aside, some folks say that the buzzing of the rattles as they lay on the back of the fiddle when playing low notes really enhances the tone and resonance.

(Not that it has anything to do with banjos or tambourines...)


All very true!

The fiddle player in my dad's band that toured the southeast in the 30's had snake rattles, but he told my dad that it really was a convienient way to keep cobb webs from forming inside the fiddle, and that's what he thought made fiddles sound bad.  It might not have been the usual reason, but at least it came from somebody that had some sort of logical reason.  wink

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Culloden

United States
1977 posts since 5/29/11

06/19/2017 16:41:38 View Culloden's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Rudy, I think the Boucher banjo you gave a link to was one of the banjos I was thinking about. Thanks for posting that.

Also, snake rattles were used not just for cobwebs but they also absorb excess moisture inside fiddles. I have seen a couple of banjo players who had them in their banjos as well.

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Dan DrabekPlayers Union Member

United States
6142 posts since 1/7/05

06/19/2017 16:50:05View Dan Drabek's MP3 Archive View Dan Drabek's Photo Albums View Dan Drabek's Blog Reply with Quote

quote:
Originally posted by mike gregory

There's the guy who does it as a BUSINESS.

More info:

https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-mozilla-002&hsimp=yhs-002&hspart=mozilla&p=banjo+tam#id=3&vid=e9cff9be26f34c2f5e69f1fd2db21d26&action=click


And that is a good example of why the idea has never caught on. :->

DD

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mikehalloranPlayers Union Member

United States
9262 posts since 10/27/06

06/19/2017 17:10:39 View mikehalloran's Classified Ads Reply with Quote

Then there's Helix and the spoons...


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John GribblePlayers Union Member

Japan
4156 posts since 5/14/07

06/19/2017 17:33:48 View John Gribble's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Snake rattles inside guitars was (is?) a Mexican tradition, too, but it's supposed to be for tone. 

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