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Zachary HoytPlayers Union Member

United States
1900 posts
since 2/18/09

01/20/2017 10:18:19 View Zachary Hoyt's MP3 Archive View Zachary Hoyt's Classified Ads View Zachary Hoyt's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

I have enjoyed reading the journals of other people's banjo builds so I figured I would put together one of my own in the hope that it might be interesting or helpful to someone.  I'll be happy to answer any questions as best I can, and if other pictures are needed to make anything clearer please let me know.  I'm posting this both here on BHO and at my website at hoytbanjos.com.  BHO has a lot more visitors, but once posts reach a certain age they are archived and the pictures are not retained, so here is a link to my website for the future when this post will lose its pictures.  
https://hoytbanjos.com/2017/01/20/how-i-build-banjos-step-by-step/

 The banjo I am building is my 44th, and it will be a 12" cherry open back 5 string with brass hardware.  I'll do my best to show each step I go through without making it too long.  I do most of my work in the evenings and will try to post each evening's work by the next day.

January 19, 8:15 PM or so: I started by going out to the loft and finding a suitable piece of cherry from the wood cart.  I got a large lot of mixed quality cherry at an estate auction in the summer of 2014 and have been using the better pieces for instruments since then.  

P1190014.JPG

Then I ran it through the little planer to clean up the surfaces and make it uniformly thick.  Sometimes in the winter I have to wait till it is warm enough to use the planer out there where there's no heat, but temperatures were in the 30s so everything was fine.

P1190015.JPG

Then I brought the board into the shop and laid the neck template on the wood and traced it.  I was thinking of putting a maple stripe down the middle of the neck but decided not to in the end because the cherry board was thick enough to make a 2 piece neck, so the maple in the photo didn't get used.

P1190016.JPG

Then I cut the board off at the end of the neck outline and took it to the bandsaw to cut out the neck and cut the waste into strips to make into blocks for the rim.  The next photo shows the strips after the neck halves were cut out.  

P1190017.JPG

The strips from the neck piece made 27 of the required 54 blocks and I cut a few more strips from around some knots in the board to make the rest.  I'll have enough wood in the board to make two more banjos from it later.  This is my dedicated block cutting saw.  It's a 7-1/4" miter saw.  I used to use the 12" miter saw but it was overkill for cutting blocks out of 1-1/8" square strips.  I use the board in my hand to hold down the cut off block so it doesn't get caught by the blade and ruined as the head comes up.  There's a notch cut in the end of the board so it holds the block down and against the fence at the same time.  

P1190018.JPG

The last thing I did before quitting for the night at about 9:50 was to glue the two neck halves together and clamp them securely.  I use more glue than is entirely needed, so it squeezes out when the clamps are applied.  It's a bit of a waste but I don't want to risk not having enough glue to fully saturate the joint, so I err on the side of too much.

P1190019.JPG

lovey

United Kingdom
8 posts since 12/31/16

01/20/2017 10:34:25 View lovey's Classified Ads View lovey's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

wish i has the skill to make one looking good

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Dan DrabekPlayers Union Member

United States
6089 posts since 1/7/05

01/20/2017 10:57:37View Dan Drabek's MP3 Archive View Dan Drabek's Photo Albums View Dan Drabek's Blog Reply with Quote

This is the kind of thing that makes this forum so interesting. I'm looking forward to seeing the process unfold. 

I like your loft. It's got character.

DD

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Alec Cramsie

Canada
158 posts since 2/4/15

01/20/2017 11:50:03 View Alec Cramsie's Photo Albums View Alec Cramsie's Blog Reply with Quote

Thank you Zachary, For taking the time out to do this, I love to see this stuff as I will be building another banjo when I have the time later on. Keep up the great work!

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rudyPlayers Union Member

United States
10871 posts since 3/27/04

01/20/2017 11:55:42View rudy's MP3 Archive View rudy's Photo Albums View rudy's Blog Reply with Quote

Zach, The photos do not disappear when topics are archived; they stay with the discussion IF the poster uses care to do it in the correct manner.  I do explain the logic of how this is done in the opening post of the  "Banjo Building 101" topic.  You'll notice that all of my posted photos are still there in that archived discussion.

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kwlPlayers Union Member

United States
438 posts since 3/5/09

01/20/2017 12:23:47 View kwl's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Thanks for sharing this Zachary. it is fun to see how other builders do things. I look forward to your future posts.

 

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Banjoman Braddock

United States
7 posts since 12/6/16

01/20/2017 12:53:39 View Banjoman Braddock's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

I'm very interested in watching this for sure! Thanks for posting.

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Ken LeVanPlayers Union Member

United States
9943 posts since 6/29/05

01/20/2017 14:28:16View Ken LeVan's MP3 Archive View Ken LeVan's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

It's always a pleasure to see someone else's process when they are doing it by hand as you are - no CNC robots. This is very interesting and I am glad you are posting it. I have said this before, but it's always enlightening to see how someone does the same thing as I do in some different way.

18 blocks in each tier is a lot, and a lot of glue joints. I would be interested to hear your rationale for this.

If I followed the thread correctly, you are not using any kind of center-stripe in the neck, but it's 2-piece book matched - looks like a nice piece of cherry.

Thanks for posting!!

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Zachary HoytPlayers Union Member

United States
1900 posts since 2/18/09

01/20/2017 15:36:18View Zachary Hoyt's MP3 Archive View Zachary Hoyt's Classified Ads View Zachary Hoyt's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Thank you all very much.  Dan, that is the loft of the new building I put up in 2015 to replace the decrepit pole barn that was here when we came 15 years ago.  It's all wood from here on the farm that I cut on the sawmill, and it took me about 7 months to tear down the pole barn and build the new two story building, but I was almost always working by myself so it was slow.

Rudy, I should have said that better.  I didn't think there was a way to keep pictures in line in the body of the post, and that is what I find to be the easiest to write and to read.  Also it's very fast and easy to load pictures on WordPress and then I found out today I can just copy and paste text and pictures and they transfer directly to the BHO window.  I am not very computer-literate so I tend to gravitate to whatever is easy.  

Ken, I lack both the skills and the funds to set up with CNC, though I do use power tools a lot, more than is perhaps strictly traditional.  I guess we each have to find our own balance point of technological advancement.  I started out with 12 blocks per layer for the first 10 or 20 rims I made, and I moved to 18 blocks for several reasons.  First is they take less wood.  A strip to make 12 block circles had to be 1-1/2" to 1-3/4" wide depending on how wide the completed rim was supposed to be, and the strips for an 18 block layer can be from 1" to 1-1/4" wide.  There is a savings of about 3/4" of length per layer with 12 instead of 18 cuts, but the wider strip far outweighs that.  My second reason is that the 18 block rim has less grain deflection from the circumference of the circle (I don't think I said that quite right) and therefore I get less chipout when turning them.  The third reason is no longer applicable, but my old lathe was not as big as the Shopsmith I use now and when I mounted a 12 block rim the corners would hit the bed unless I cut them off on the bandsaw before turning.  I could have gone to 16 blocks but I liked the easy math of a 10 degree cut.  I've made well over 100 of these kind of rims and have sold a lot of them to other people who make banjos, and some have said that they sound as good as any rim they've had, so I don't think the glue kills the sound too much.  I hope that all makes sense, sometimes I have trouble explaining what I am seeing in my head.

I'm off to the shop now and will have more to report either later tonight or tomorrow.  

Zach

 

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Kimerer

United States
698 posts since 2/17/06

01/20/2017 15:44:38View Kimerer's MP3 Archive View Kimerer's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Awesome thread. I will be following this as well.

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mike gregory

United States
45168 posts since 12/14/05

01/20/2017 16:16:51View mike gregory's MP3 Archive View mike gregory's Photo Albums View mike gregory's Blog Reply with Quote

" I have trouble explaining what I am seeing in my head."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm sorry!

I didn't realize that what I had, was so contagious! clown

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workinprogress

United States
63 posts since 10/4/14

01/21/2017 10:58:53 View workinprogress's Photo Albums View workinprogress's Blog Reply with Quote

  Can't wait for update, I  will also be watching ,very interesting , i,m curious what all the blocks are for ,but i will wait and see,Hope it stays warm enough to continue the build.      

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Zachary HoytPlayers Union Member

United States
1900 posts since 2/18/09

01/21/2017 11:30:57View Zachary Hoyt's MP3 Archive View Zachary Hoyt's Classified Ads View Zachary Hoyt's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

This is a very long post.  I didn't spend that much time in the shop but it involved a lot of steps so a lot of pictures and attempts to explain them.----

Since I hadn't glued the blocks into rings the night before I did it after lunch on the 20th.  I have found that it saves time to apply glue to 6 blocks at a time.

P1200001.JPG

Then I stand them all on their non-gluey ends and start sticking them down on the piece of masking tape that I have unrolled sticky side up on the table.  This must be done fairly rapidly so that the glue doesn't have time to run down off the ends of the blocks onto the table.

P1200002.JPG

Then I tear the tape off at the 18th block, grab the two end blocks and bring them together at the top of the circle.  This bit of the job is an illustration of the maxim "He who hesitates is lost" because if I don't keep moving upward with the end blocks other ones will start to fall off the tape and the whole thing falls apart.  As long as it's done quickly it's quite easy.  Then I lay the ring on its side on the old stone slab and put the band clamp around it.  I keep each band clamp in its own container with a little piece of scrap wood from when I used to make 12 sided rims which I put under the clamp shoe so that the clamp doesn't push the block under the ratchet out of line.  I tighten the clamp and then hit each joint with a mallet to drive them all flat against the stone and make the ring as even as possible.

P1200003.JPG

Once the ring is as flat as possible I hang it up to dry, with the tail end of the band clamp out of the way so glue doesn't drip on it.  This process is takes longer to describe than to perform, with each ring taking about 5 minutes or a bit less to assemble.

P1200004.JPG

In the evening I worked for about two hours, mostly on the neck.  First I took it out to the loft and ran it over the jointer a few times to make a nice flat surface on the fretboard plane.

P1200018.JPG

Then I brought it back inside and sanded the fretboard surface flat on the 12" disk sander on the end of the Shopsmith.  I don't usually have this pile of wood between the Shopsmith and the rolling table, but it's acclimating for a few weeks prior to being made into a dining able and a countertop.  The rest of the mess in the shop is typical for me.

P1200019.JPG

Then I made some measurements and cut off about an extra 1/8" from the back of the neck on the bandsaw.  I like to have a little extra wood so that if I have to take more off on the jointer than I had planned it doesn't come out too thin.  Sometimes wood will move a bit as tension releases when a board is cut, but this wood seemed very stable.

P1200020.JPG

Then I got out the big ruler which I mainly keep for necks and other jobs where I need a really straight line, and laid out the neck shape on the fretboard surface.  I usually build necks so that the center line of the blank is the 3rd string path, unless I am using a contrasting stripe.  The line to the treble side of the neck from the 3rd string path is the truss rod line.  The rest of it is just the outline of what is to be cut.

P1200021.JPG

The next stop is the bench with the woodworkers vise.  I put a straight board in the vise to act as a fence and then clamp the neck to the bench so that the truss rod line is 3" from the fence.

P1200022.JPG

Then I plunge the router bit into the neck at the nut and make a single full-depth pass to the heel.  I have to cut from right to left when the fence is on my side of the workpiece because that way the rotation of the bit pulls the router to the fence.  If I started the cut at the heel it would pull the router away and the cut would be wavy.

P1200023.JPG

Then I tilted the bandsaw table and made a cut on each side of the heel and along the neck, removing a bit of the corner.  I just eyeball this, there are no marks needed.

P1200024.JPG

Then I drilled a 5/16" hole for the adjustment barrel on the end of the truss rod and put the neck into the fixture for cutting the heel on the spindle sander.  It's a pretty self-explanatory design, the cams are adjustable for different neck widths.  I got the idea from Rudy on BHO, whose website bluestemstrings.com was a big help to me.

P1200025.JPG

Then I took the neck back to the woodworker's vise and used the router to cut the tension hoop ledge.  I followed the curve I had just made on the spindle sander.  P1200026.JPG

Then I glued the peghead ear onto the neck.  I only need one, and I got it from the piece of the neck that I cut away from the area where the 5th string isn't, just below the peghead.  That way the color will at least match.

P1200027.JPG

I went away for an hour and when I came back I got the rings of blocks down and took the clamps and tape off them and sanded them flat on both sides.  I use a regular 4x36 belt sander with a 50 grit sanding belt and revolve the rings hand over hand on top of the sander.  Once I can see that the whole surface has been sanded I do the other side. The dust collector is hooked up so the end of the hose is near the sander and most of the dust gets picked up.

P1200028.JPG

Once all of the rings were sanded on both sides I put glue on the top of the two bottom layers, then stacked them and put them in the vise lightly so I could adjust them against each other so that they were pretty well lined up.  Then I put handscrews on and tightened the vise and left it overnight.

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Then I went back to the bandsaw and cut a slice off a piece of cherry burl and found a part of without too many voids that was big enough to make the peghead overlay.

P1200030.JPG

I cut off the excess on three sides and sanded the nut end of the overlay to an angle so that it is perpendicular to the fretboard plane.  This will help hold the nut in place.

P1200031.JPG

Then I glued the overlay onto the peghead.  The glue comes through the voids, so instead of using a caul to clamp it I just used a lot of small clamps so I could clean up some of the glue as it came through.

P1200032.JPG

Then I did some minor vacuuming and putting away of things, and quit for the night.

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rubicon

United States
894 posts since 2/22/09

01/21/2017 11:41:18View rubicon's MP3 Archive View rubicon's Classified Ads View rubicon's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

This is a great thread !!

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WyattSpurgin

United States
19 posts since 1/2/17

01/21/2017 14:59:37 View WyattSpurgin's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Nice job with the pictures and explanations! Good to see how you do it!
Wyatt

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BNJOMAKR

United States
4216 posts since 9/7/09

01/21/2017 16:45:13View BNJOMAKR's MP3 Archive View BNJOMAKR's Classified Ads View BNJOMAKR's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Luvin' this!

 

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workinprogress

United States
63 posts since 10/4/14

01/22/2017 09:10:08 View workinprogress's Photo Albums View workinprogress's Blog Reply with Quote

        i'm hooked on the build ,learning alot,Just one question why do use blocks to make banjo pot  instead of cutting one complete square and cutting or rounding the corners and cutting out the center, sorry might seem like a stupid question to some but I never built a banjo before but would like to, thanks 

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Zachary HoytPlayers Union Member

United States
1900 posts since 2/18/09

01/22/2017 09:16:57View Zachary Hoyt's MP3 Archive View Zachary Hoyt's Classified Ads View Zachary Hoyt's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Thank you all very much.  Workinprogress, I've often been told that there are no stupid questions and I believe it to be true.  Rims have been made the way you describe but they are not likely to be as stable since wood expands and contracts across the grain with humidity changes but not along the length of the grain.  This would make the rim go out of round on a regular seasonal basis unless it was in a climate controlled room.  Also wood is stronger along its length, which is why the grain runs along the neck instead of across it, for instance.  Most banjo rim making methods involve the grain running more or less around the circumference of the circle, and this seems to work best according to my understanding.  I hope that helps with your question

Here's last night's work:

On the 21st I got to the shop about 6 PM and worked for about three hours.  My first task was to remove the clamps from the peghead and sand it flat on the disk sander.  Then I traced the template onto it, ready to cut out.  The template and the fret position sheet shown later in this post both came from the former Bluestemstrings.com and have been very helpful to me.  I believe they are still available online but I don't know the current address.  

P1210033.JPG

Next while the neck was still squarish I put it on the Shopsmith and drilled a 5/8" hole with a Forstner bit.  I set the table of the Shopsmith to a 3 degree tilt toward the headstock.  This should make the dowel stick come out very close to parallel to the head since the neck heel is cut to 3 degrees.  

P1210034.JPG

Then I took the neck back to the bandsaw and cut the corners off to save time sanding the neck profile.  I don't tilt the table for this job, I just carefully hold the neck at an angle. It's pretty rough, but there's no need for precision as long as I don't cut too deeply into the neck.

P1210035.JPG

Then I took the neck back to the disk sander and used it to round it into a comfortable shape.  I aim for a continuous curve but I don't use profile templates so each neck is a bit different.  I used a 1" belt sander to shape the bass side of the neck along the first 5 frets.  Then I went back to the spindle sander and used the 2" drum to shape the heel and peghead transitions.  

P1210036.JPG

The next step was to put a dowel in the vise to hold the neck up vertically and sand it further with the random orbit sander.  I use the lamp to show any defects in the surface, and with the heel end of the neck held in place by the dowel in the mortise I can hold the peghead in my left hand and the sander in my right and rotate the neck as I sand.  I'm not trying to get the final surface here, just to remove the scratches from the sanding disk and any irregularities that remain.  

P1210037.JPG

While all this was going on I was also waiting for the hot glue gun to get up to temperature.  I like to leave it plugged in for at least 20 minutes to assure that the glue is good and hot.  I ran a bead of hot glue around the edge of the particle board faceplate and stuck it to the back of the rim blank.  I'm thinking about making an aluminum faceplate instead since the particle board flakes away a bit when I pop the rim off after turning, so I have to keep replacing the faceplate after every 20 rims or so.  

P1210038.JPG

Once the rim is mounted I start turning the outside down to size, and then I turn the top down till it's flat all the way around.  Then I can check with a framing square to see if the rim walls are perpendicular and what the diameter is.  I turned it down to 12" and then held a strip or 120 grit sandpaper against the rim while it was still spinning.

P1210039.JPG

Then I returned to the top of the rim and made a tone ring profile, and turned the inside of the rim, aiming for 5/8" thick walls.  P1210040.JPG

Then I popped the rim off the faceplate with a chisel and took it to the spindle sander to clean up the interior.  I don't do well at sanding the inside while it's still on the lathe and the spindle sander makes the inside of the rim stay parallel to the outside while it's being sanded.

P1210041.JPG

The next step was to get started on the fretboard.  I had a piece of jatoba in my box of fretboard wood that was already cut and planed to size, so I didn't have to do that step.  I often cut and plane them in batches to save time.  I put the truss rod into the neck at this point too, just so I wouldn't forget to put it in before gluing the fretboard on (I did that once).  

P1210043.JPG

I used the helpful fret position template to lay out the fret locations on the board for a 25.5" scale length with 17 frets.  

P1210044.JPG

Then I clamped the fretboard down to the workbench and used a speed square and a fret slot saw to cut the frets.  I had cut the first 5 or so when I took the picture.  I am working on a cheap power saw setup for slotting but it is not ready for the big time yet.  I hold the speed square in my left hand and the saw in my right to cut each slot, and the square keeps the fret slots all parallel if I do it right.

P1210045.JPG

Once all the slots were cut I used my ever-faithful tomato paste can to draw the scoop.  I use it a lot when laying out necks and such too.

P1210046.JPG

Then I got out my 'good' router which is variable speed, and routed the scoop with a tray bit on a fairly low speed.  I have found that it burns less when I am moving the router slowly if the RPM is low.  I can't move the router fast or I miss the line, but maybe someday I'll get better at it.

P1210048.JPG

Then I laid the neck on the back of the fretboard and got it lined up carefully and drew around it, then I cut it out on the bandsaw.  I used a ruler to lay out the position of the 5 dots, making an x from corner to corner for the centered ones and measuring to accurately place the double dots at the 12th fret position.  I used a 1/4" Forstner bit in the drill press to make the holes.  

P1210049.JPG

I make my dots from cut off pieces of 1/4" brass rod which are scraps from when I buy a 4' piece and only need 39 inches or so to make a tone hoop.  I cut 50 or so at a time and keep them in a little bag, and then I can compare each hole to the assortment of dots and find ones that will be proud of the fretboard surface by a little bit but not too much.  I use #30 Stew-Mac super glue in each hole and tap the dots in with a hammer.  Then I roughly sand them down close to the surface on the disk sander with its usual 80 grit, then with the random orbit sander and a 120 grit disk, and then with a sanding block and 180 grit, working back and forth.  I give the fretboard surface a final going-over with 400 grit sandpaper to remove the scratches from the 180 and it's ready to fret.

P1210050.JPG

I use EVO Gold fret wire on banjos with brass hardware because it sort of matches the color and also it's supposed to wear a little better than regular nickel-silver like I use on everything else.  It comes in a coil and I find that I don't get as good results with the arbor press with it as when I'm using straight wire, so I hammer the frets in and that way they seem to be more uniform.  I cut them off as close as I can with end cutters, always cutting in from the sides.  I find that if I cut them from top to bottom the tang gets mashed out of shape so I don't do that.  With regular fret wire I use a pair of cutters from Stew-Mac that cut closer to the surface but they can be damaged by the EVO from what I have read.

P1210051.JPG

The next task was to dress the fret ends flush.  First I lay the board flat on the sander table and sand off the ends, and then I roll the ends against the disk to dress the fret ends to an angle so they won't feel sharp or rough.  I try to take off just a tiny corner of the fretboard when I do this and then cut the fret tops back at about 45 degrees, and that seems to me to be the most comfortable to my hand.  P1210052.JPG

P1210053.JPG

My last activity for the night was to put masking tape over the truss rod cavity so that it runs out to about 1/16" on either side and then glue the fretboard to the neck.  I have an ash caul that I always use for fretboards because it is hard and quite straight, and I use any pine scraps for the back of the neck cauls.  This is to keep the clamps from digging into the wood and so that if any wood gets crushed by the pressure and mis-matched shapes it will be the softer pine and not the cherry at the back of the neck.  I use the knife to hold the nut end of the fretboard down by wedging it between the top of the fretboard and the bottom of the caul.P1210054.JPG

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workinprogress

United States
63 posts since 10/4/14

01/22/2017 09:17:45 View workinprogress's Photo Albums View workinprogress's Blog Reply with Quote

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workinprogress

United States
63 posts since 10/4/14

01/22/2017 09:18:25 View workinprogress's Photo Albums View workinprogress's Blog Reply with Quote

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Ken LeVanPlayers Union Member

United States
9943 posts since 6/29/05

01/22/2017 09:19:38View Ken LeVan's MP3 Archive View Ken LeVan's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

quote:
Originally posted by Zachary Hoyt

...I moved to 18 blocks for several reasons.  First is they take less wood.  A strip to make 12 block circles had to be 1-1/2" to 1-3/4" wide depending on how wide the completed rim was supposed to be, and the strips for an 18 block layer can be from 1" to 1-1/4" wide.  There is a savings of about 3/4" of length per layer with 12 instead of 18 cuts, but the wider strip far outweighs that.  My second reason is that the 18 block rim has less grain deflection from the circumference of the circle (I don't think I said that quite right) and therefore I get less chipout when turning them. ... I don't think the glue kills the sound too much....

Zach

 


Zach, thanks,

I understand, and good wood utilization is an important thing, especially with special kinds of wood. One of the rim types I make uses very little wood and can utilize small pieces. You seem to have engineered your system very well. Are all your rims the same thickness?

I agree with you that the glue is not a big deal, nor does it kill the sound. I think we obsess over glue way too much. In some kinds of laminated rims, the glue is an important ingredient.

Ken

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Zachary HoytPlayers Union Member

United States
1900 posts since 2/18/09

01/22/2017 10:46:20View Zachary Hoyt's MP3 Archive View Zachary Hoyt's Classified Ads View Zachary Hoyt's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Ken, thank you very much.  I have experimented with different rim thicknesses over time and have settled on 5/8" for my 12" banjos.  It seems like it should be a bit stronger than 1/2" but not as heavy as 3/4".  When I'm making rims to sell to other builders I do whatever they want, usually between 1/2" and 3/4".  I just found out that a rim I had made last spring is having issues, in a banjo I sold last June.  I will be making a new one for that banjo, and I think this time I will add a rim cap if it is indeed a 1/2" rim.  I don't know if the problem it's having is due to a defect in workmanship or if it had an incident in the mail or at some later time that stressed it, but either way it's the first one of this type that I've heard about having a problem.  My first 6 or 8 rims were what I would call a mono-block type where there was only one ring of blocks, the full height of the rim, and I've replaced a couple of those.  I should go back through my email from 5 years ao and see if I can find the owners of those first few banjos and offer to replace the rims, but I don't know how likely they are to both still have the save email address and still have the banjo after this long.

Zach

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Parker135Players Union Member

United States
187 posts since 2/19/12

01/22/2017 13:21:03 View Parker135's Classified Ads View Parker135's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Hey, Zach, your thread comes at a great time for me.  I've been building from Rudy's Banjo 101 plans and have the neck ready for frets.  I've been thinking about what my next build will be (no way I can stop after only one banjo), and your detailed description is a great reference.  I also use a Shopsmith, mine built in 1979, so it's fun to see yours in action as well.  Thanks so much for taking the time to do this.

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Stephen45710Players Union Member

United States
308 posts since 4/13/11

01/22/2017 14:39:14 View Stephen45710's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Zach, thanks for the effort you have put into this thread! I love it! I have bought 3 rims and a neck blank from you and I'm very grateful for your services to the banjo community. 


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SHBosch

203 posts since 6/12/16

01/22/2017 14:43:28 View SHBosch's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Everyone loves these kind of threads. They should be mandatory haha


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rubicon

United States
894 posts since 2/22/09

01/22/2017 16:09:26View rubicon's MP3 Archive View rubicon's Classified Ads View rubicon's Photo Albums Reply with Quote

Very interesting thanks for posting this

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