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 ARCHIVED TOPIC: using torque wrench to set head tension


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malarz - Posted - 02/28/2010:  12:27:58


Banjo is a Lo Gordon open back, Renaissance head. I'm trying to set/equalize the tension using an inch-pounds torque wrench. What is a good/general/average inch-pound setting I shoot shoot for?

Thanks for any advice or warnings.

ralph3820 - Posted - 02/28/2010:  13:23:49


Ihave a Rich and Tyalor and I have it set to a 9 which is a G# I would start with a low 6 or 7 and work up jmo

malarz - Posted - 02/28/2010:  13:50:39


Thanks for the reply. Not sure what you mean by "6 or 7." Inch pounds? Foot pounds?

ralph3820 - Posted - 02/28/2010:  14:00:40


SORRY: I have the neary drum torque wrench it has numbers from 1 to 25 you may have a different wrench

phwill - Posted - 02/28/2010:  14:35:30


The Neary drum torque wrench is graduated in kg-cm. By my calculations, 7 kg.-cm equals 6.1 in-lb. I used 7 kg-cm because that's where I use mine to get a G# on my RB250. Hope this helps.

grm405 - Posted - 02/28/2010:  15:09:55


Torque settings vary depending on what you want it to sound like. I use 10 kg-cm on my OME Silverspun with a Renaissance head and 7-9 kg kg-cm on Masterclone types with Weatherking heads.

Gerry

stelling man - Posted - 02/28/2010:  15:33:59


You cannot use a foot pounds torque wrench on a banjo, you can use an inch pounds wrench, I would start with about 5 or 6 inch pounds and go from there..

STELLING MAN

R Buck - Posted - 02/28/2010:  15:46:03


Tighten the head. Then check out how it sounds. Back it off accordingly. IMHO those wrenches only feed neuroses. You would be better off following the idea that Ken Perlman put forth in his Banjo Newsletter article for March. But that too seems like a bit much IMHO.

grm405 - Posted - 02/28/2010:  17:29:33


"IMHO those wrenches only feed neuroses"

Gee, does that mean the Steve Huber, who includes one with his banjos, is neurotic?


Gerry

Stringbean45 - Posted - 02/28/2010:  19:25:22


I use a Utica inch pound "clicker" torque wrench, and find 6 inch pounds, gives me a G# on most banjos. I also have a Neary Drum Torque Wrench, but much prefer, the Utica.

WildJimbo - Posted - 02/28/2010:  20:44:36


quote:
Originally posted by grm405

"IMHO those wrenches only feed neuroses"

Gee, does that mean the Steve Huber, who includes one with his banjos, is neurotic?


Gerry



Maybe...

However, the banjos I've seen him set up he did without the aid of a torque wrench or drumdial.

Sure, if I wanted to set banjos up to a particular spec that I was selling and wanted them all alike, you bet I'd use a fancy tool to speed up the process.

JohnJ - Posted - 02/28/2010:  21:39:06


quote:

Sure, if I wanted to set banjos up to a particular spec that I was selling and wanted them all alike, you bet I'd use a fancy tool to speed up the process.



Or perhaps if you bought a particular banjo because you loved the sound you'd buy a torque wrench and/or a drum dial and measure it when it was new so you could keep the sound.....


Edited by - JohnJ on 02/28/2010 21:40:39

Phil D - Posted - 03/01/2010:  00:20:41


quote:
Originally posted by stelling man

You cannot use a foot pounds torque wrench on a banjo, you can use an inch pounds wrench, I would start with about 5 or 6 inch pounds and go from there..

STELLING MAN



Sure you can, once!

blackshirtbacker - Posted - 03/01/2010:  06:09:18


quote:
Originally posted by JohnJ

quote:

Sure, if I wanted to set banjos up to a particular spec that I was selling and wanted them all alike, you bet I'd use a fancy tool to speed up the process.



Or perhaps if you bought a particular banjo because you loved the sound you'd buy a torque wrench and/or a drum dial and measure it when it was new so you could keep the sound.....




I believe thats why Steve includes the wrench. He sets the banjo up for his "Vintage flat head sound" at around a G# but it varies from banjo to banjo and a lot of us can't hear the G# when tap tuning. So his number and the Neary wrench (both included) is what we have to go by and start with. Of course we all have different ideas of how it should sound but the "Yoda" of banjo set-up gives us a good spot to start searching for the sound in our banjo's. Steve has had more Pre war Flatheads in his hands than most people and knows what they sound like. I know I won't stray too far from his recommendation. I cant wait till the UPS man pulls into my drive way!!!

blackshirtbacker - Posted - 03/01/2010:  06:10:50


quote:
Originally posted by JohnJ

quote:

Sure, if I wanted to set banjos up to a particular spec that I was selling and wanted them all alike, you bet I'd use a fancy tool to speed up the process.



Or perhaps if you bought a particular banjo because you loved the sound you'd buy a torque wrench and/or a drum dial and measure it when it was new so you could keep the sound.....




I believe thats why Steve includes the wrench. He sets the banjo up for his "Vintage flat head sound" at around a G# but it varies from banjo to banjo and a lot of us can't hear the G# when tap tuning. So his number and the Neary wrench (both included) is what we have to go by and start with. Of course we all have different ideas of how it should sound but the "Yoda" of banjo set-up gives us a good spot to start searching for the sound in our banjo's. Steve has had more Pre war Flatheads in his hands than most people and knows what they sound like. I know I won't stray too far from his recommendation. I cant wait till the UPS man pulls into my drive way!!!

FXHERE - Posted - 03/01/2010:  14:53:59


Number three torque setting on my Black and Decker 18 volt cordless drill does the trick every time..

Kenneth Logsdon - Posted - 03/01/2010:  15:50:58


It doesn't matter much as long as it gives you a "value" for the sound.. By asigning a number to each type of sound and retaining it.. It can replace much trial and error/experience of the "hand method" very quickly.. The thing that was the most amazing for me after acquireing the drum torque was how close in consistency my fingers method actually was.. The wolfing about thread differences is just a myth..

malarz - Posted - 03/01/2010:  16:03:04


Well, thanks to everyone who responded. Methinks I'll stick with the accordion--less tuning, less variables!

But, I will avoid the torque wrench. In fact, I didn't realize how tight you can get that head. i guess 70 in-lbs was a little too tight.



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